Items tagged with Health

Talk about an unpleasant conversation -- officials from Montana have begun alerting approximately 1.3 million people that their personal information may have been compromised by a data breach. At present, there's no evidence that any information was stolen, however it has been confirmed that hackers infiltrated a server used by the state health department. "There is no information, no indication, that the hackers really accessed any of this information or used it inappropriately," said Richard Opper, director of the State Department of Public Health and Human Services. "We are erring on the side of displaying an overabundance of caution." Image Source: Flickr (Sebastian Bergmann) Montana is home... Read more...
Once the rumor about LG’s upcoming wearables broke, it didn’t take long for an image of one of them to emerge online. Always good for a leaked photo, Evleaks posted one of the fitness band that LG was said to be calling the “G-Health”. It appears that the name can be scrapped, though, as the wrist-mounted fitness device will be called the LG Lifeband Touch. The photo shows a black bracelet with a small gap in the ring, which presumably allows the wearer to easily slip the device on and off. The LG logo is stamped on one tip, and there’s a green-ringed black button that will presumably be the main means of controlling the Lifeband Touch. Credit: Evleaks We’d... Read more...
It's a wireless world we live in these days, and unless you reside in an isolated area far removed from civilization and devoid of electronic gadgets, you can't walk from the bedroom to the bathroom without bonking into a barrage of wireless signals. Should we be concerned? So far so good -- we haven't mutated as a species to carry around a third arm or anything of that nature, though there are something interesting things to observe in this Wi-Fi society we've built up. One of them is recent research by a group of 9th grade female students from Denmark who discovered that the wireless radiation from routers prevents nearby plants from growing, Natural News reports. The five students decided... Read more...
Apple's update to iOS 7 is the most drastic change to its mobile platform in a long time, and for some users, it's downright sickening. Literally. If you've noticed that any of your iPhone wielding friends are looking green around the gills lately, it could be due to the subtle movements and zoom effects introduced in iOS 7, which some users have complained are making them nauseous. "I thought I was going crazy today after I updated my phone and I noticed I was feeling queasy every time I used it. Now I see I am not alone! I just used my phone for about 20 minutes and now I feel like I'm going to vomit. There has to be a way to turn this off!," an iPhone user wrote in a thread on Apple's support... Read more...
It seems like most of the studies involving video games have to do with trying to link real-world violence with violent video games (intermittently broken up by voices of reason). It gets old, so try this on for size. In a refreshing change of pace, a new study shows that seniors who play video games have a higher sense of emotional well-being. Researchers from North Carolina State University asked 140 people aged 63 and older if they play video games, and if they do, how often. Around 61 percent said they play games on occasion, while 35 percent said they play at least once a week. Those who said they play video games demonstrated higher levels of well-being. And the non-gamers? They tended... Read more...
Diablo III proved deadly for an 18-year-old gamer who died at an Internet cafe in Taiwan after playing the hack-and-slash title for 40 straight hours without taking a break. Local media reports he didn't eat for nearly two days until he ultimately collapsed and died. Police are currently investigating the official cause of death with the help of an autopsy, but it's expected he died of cardiovascular problems resulting from spending hours and hours in a sedentary position. This is actually the second time someone in Taiwan has died this year from playing videogames. Videogame related deaths aren't as infrequent or rare as one might think. They're usually associated with marathon game sessions... Read more...
Listen up fellas, this one applies to you. According to a report in the medical journal Fertility and Sterility, your laptop's wireless signal could be killing your sperm. That's right, downloading music or firing off an email might be wiping out millions of potential offspring every time you sit down with your notebook. Reuters read the report and says the scientists tested their theory by placing semen samples from 29 healthy men under a laptop connected to the Internet. They then turned on Wi-Fi and proceeded to download files. After four hours of Internet activity, around 25 percent of the sperm samples were no longer swimming, compared to 14 percent of semen from samples that were stored... Read more...
IBM is well known for creating some pretty radical devices and solutions. From supercomputers to improvements in business efficiency, IBM is credited with doing a whole lot in the business/tech world. Unfortunately, it also had to lay off thousands of workers earlier this year as the economy declined, but as things pick back up, the company is looking to set a precendent. Or at least generate favor with the employees that are left. Starting in 2010, IBM will provide its US employees with 100% coverage of primary health care. Read that again. Now, wonder why your employer isn't doing the same. As the US government goes back and forth with its "public option," IBM is doing what every other major... Read more...
A new study by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Emory University and Andrews University concludes that the average age of video-gamers in the U.S. is in the range 35–54. It also says that those gamers are fat, and miserable, though differences exist across genders. With regards to the weighty "fat" conclusion, it's unclear if those surveyed had Nintendo Wiis with "exergaming" titles or not. The study, "Health-Risk Correlates of Video-Game Playing Among Adults," published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, analyzed data from 552 adults in the Seattle-Tacoma area. The subjects ranged in age from 19 to 90. About 45% of respondents said they... Read more...
We've all heard it before -- "turn that music down, or you'll lose your hearing!" According to a European Union scientific body, said phrase has never been truer. According to new data released this week by the EU Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (what a mouthful!), up to ten million young Europeans are "in danger of damaging their hearing by playing their MP3 personal music players too loud." Rather obviously, the study found that "listening to MP3 players and other personal music players at high volumes for long periods of time could cause loss of hearing and tinnitus, a ringing sensation in the ears." In more interesting news, it also discovered that between... Read more...
The so-called "silver tsunami" is coming, and there's nothing we can do to stop it. In order to ensure that the coming wave of baby boomers are well taken care of, medical outfitters the world over are working around the clock to crank out new technologies that can keep seniors out of nursing homes longer and independently functional. Some of the latest concoctions dreamed up by medical device manufacturers involve complex sensor systems that can be embedded into anything from carpet to bed sheets. For example, one Eva Olweea -- an 86-year old gal who was having trouble resting at night -- was cured of her restlessness after sensor-laden sheets informed watchful researchers that excessive bloating... Read more...
A Bloomberg report citing "a person familiar with the matter" indicates that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has begun a probe into the disclosures made by Apple regarding Steve Jobs' health, to determine if in fact investors may have been misled. The "Steve Jobs Health Story" has taken on a life of its own, in a soap opera-ish way. First it was noted at last year's WWDC conference that Jobs look gaunt and tired. There were multiple denials over any health issues by Apple and Jobs, including a December report by Jim Goldman where he said that "sources inside the company tell me that Jobs' decision was more about politics than his pancreas." However, as recent as early January Jobs... Read more...
In response to the announcement of a medical leave by Steve Jobs, a group of analysts was assembled to discuss the issue on CNBC. Key among them was Jim Goldman, CNBC's Silicon Valley Bureau chief, and Dan Lyons, who formerly played the "role" of "Fake Steve (Jobs)," on a satiric blog. The exchange between the two was contentious, and included Lyons asking Goldman to apologize to Gizmodo, whom he mocked when they said Jobs' health was "rapidly declining." You can watch the video below; the exchange starts about 3:30 into the video. What Lyons said was: There are two kinds of reporters who cover Apple: the kind who realize they're getting snowed and and they're getting bullied and they're getting... Read more...
Last year a report from the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Australia said that the particles of toner released by laser printers might be as bad for your health as cigarette smoke. A new study from Germany's Fraunhofer Wilhelm Klauditz Institute (WKI) purportedly refutes that conclusion. The report, interestingly, was done in collaboration with QUT, and states that contrary to the prior study, laser printers are not releasing toner into the air, but rather "ultra-fine particles made of volatile organic-chemical substances (VOCs)." WKI head of department Prof. Dr. Tunga Salthammer said, “One essential property of these ultra-fine particles is their volatility, which indicates that... Read more...
Google is calling it a beta, but we're calling it a breath of fresh air (depending on where you live, of course, your air might a bit more fresh than the air we breathe here in New York City). Today, Google has added walking directions to its popular Google Maps page. Whenever you use Google Maps for directions, if the destination is within 10km (about 6.2 miles) of the originating point, walking directions will be offered as an option in addition to the traditional driving directions. Google Software Engineer, Andy Schwerin announced the feature on the Google Lat Long Blog this morning. He warns, however, while the feature is now available, it comes with some caveats:"Walking directions are... Read more...
A recent poll shows that more and more Americans are turning to the Internet for information about health and health issues.  In fact, according to the 2007 Consumer Medical and Health Information poll, nearly as many Americans list the Web as their primary source of medical information as do their doctor. The 2007 Consumer Medical and Health Information poll, commissioned by search engine Ask.com and performed by Harris Interactive Inc., revealed that 70% of adults use the Internet as a primary source for health information and that 72% describe their doctor as a primary source. The study also found that 76% of adults older than 55 -- a group sometimes stereotyped as eschewing the Web --... Read more...
Tonight we'll kick off the weekend with something off-topic that might just get you fighting mad - as in angry.  We all know the health care system here in the US leaves a lot to be desired in spots.  Insurance companies shafting patients in need, drug companies gouging; you know the drill.  But when the “good Doctor” is too blinded by his own jaded view of the people that he is charged with the responsibility of healing, it’s just plain inexcusable.  We’re all human, sure.  Humans make mistakes.  However, if the pride of something as superficial as our vocational pedigree gets in the way of sound judgment, it quickly goes beyond human – or in other words - inhumane.     "The doctor... Read more...
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