Items tagged with GOOG

Google CEO Eric Schmidt recently gave a speech about the future of Google to a crowd of surfers and texters.  The talk covered several topics from dealing with governments such as China to the future of Google.  Here's a snippet:   "Just weeks after Google announced iGoogle, a new name for its personalized home page with gadgets that tell Google about users for individualized service, Schmidt indicated Google would become much more personal in the future."You can imagine in 10 years, Google will say, "Good morning Eric! You're late already, but, Eric, you're always late."Friedman said the Internet makes it difficult for politicians to escape their mistakes, and few... Read more...
I can't think of any large company that's anonymous on the internet.Same goes for individuals. If you're somebody, the internet knows you. As websearch prominence begins to mean more and more to people from everyday walks of life, they realize it works both ways: you're no-one if Google thinks you're no-one. In the age of Google, being special increasingly requires standing out from the crowd online. Many people aspire for themselves -- or their offspring -- to command prominent placement in the top few links on search engines or social networking sites' member lookup functions. But, as more people flood the Web, that's becoming an especially tall order for those with common names.... Read more...
Microsoft is no longer the most visited website or the most valuable global brand. Google is: Google had 528 million unique visitors in March, up 5 percent from the previous month, according to comScore. Microsoft had 527 million visitors during the same month, up 3.7 percent. Popular in the United States, Google is even more of a powerhouse in many European countries. In a statement, Google said: "Our goal has always been to provide the best online experience for our users. We build products based on user needs and input, which is part of what makes Google unique and results in a great online experience."... Read more...
Intel To Power 300,000 New Google Servers? DigiTimes has a new article about Google and a possible purchase of 300,000 or more new Intel-powered servers: "According to sources at motherboard makers, Intel recently landed a deal with search engine giant Google to supply CPUs for about 300,000-400,000 servers for Google, with Intel sweetening the deal by providing free chipsets to support the processors. The sources stated that Intel will provide a custom-designed solution for Google's servers, with Gigabyte Technology expected to support the project, as the motherboard maker has had a manufacturing relationship with Google in the past." The fact that Google seems to be leaning the way of Intel... Read more...
There are certainly a lot of assumptions in there, but an interesting read nonetheless. Perhaps the funny thing is that this site, which will undoubtedly find itself getting hit a few hundred thousand times isn't very black. It is, in fact, rather white for most part. Let's assume... "Take at look at Google, for instance, who gets about 200 million queries a day. Let's assume each query is displayed for about 10 seconds; that means Google is running for about 550,000 hours every day on some desktop. Assuming that users run Google in full screen mode, the shift to a black background will save a total of 15 (74-59) watts. Now take into... Read more...
Microsoft Office costs a ransom. Google Apps is so "Beta" you might as well program it yourself. A useful, inexpensive web-based productivity suite is perhaps the most intensely desired vaporware in the history of ones and zeros. Well, Adventnet thinks they've got the answer, and they call their online/offline compatible suite Zoho. Slate magazine took a look: While they don't replicate every function of their Microsoftian counterparts, Zoho's programs are highly evolved by online standards. Zoho Writer, for instance, handles basic graphics and lists with aplomb, incorporates tools for Web-page design and blogging, and offers multiple... Read more...
Viacom, purveyors of fine video entertainment such as SpongeBob Squarepants, among many others, is not happy. They've been in negotiations with YouTube's parent company, Google, to allow their content to appear for a cut of revenue. They've decided to go the direct route instead: Sue Google for a billion dollars worth of copyright infringement. "Their business model, which is based on building traffic and selling advertising off of unlicensed content, is clearly illegal and is in obvious conflict with copyright laws," the media-entertainment firm said in a statement. Viacom filed suit in a New York district court accusing YouTube... Read more...
Google's idea of web based applications have Microsoft thinking. As the idea of web based applications continues to grow, Microsoft is getting busy with plans to keep Microsoft Word, Excel, and Power Point competitive. Ray Ozzie, Microsoft's new chief software architect, does not think the company will develop web-only applications but instead, applications based on mobile devices that will take advantage of the PC as well as web and mobile services. Watching Google Inc. rake in advertising revenue "was a wake-up call within Microsoft," the company's top technical executive, Ray Ozzie, said Tuesday. But he said Microsoft... Read more...
Engineers at Google have published a PDF concerning hard drives and what factors are most likely to cause them to fail. They studied 100,000 hard drives over the course of five years and had some pretty interesting findings. "It is estimated that over 90% of all new information produced in the world is being stored on magnetic media, most of it on hard disk drives. Despite their importance, there is relatively little published work on the failure patterns of disk drives, and the key factors that affect their lifetime. Most available data are either based on extrapolation from accelerated aging experiments or from relatively modest sized field... Read more...
Veoh, the latest internet video clip site, officially opens up today. It's banking on higher quality content, and DVD quality picture. Is it going to be YouTube on steroids -- or on tranquilizers? San Diego-based Veoh Networks is the brainchild of onetime Internet piracy cop Dmitry Shapiro. After a year and a half of public testing, the site formally opens for business stocked with more than 100,000 videos by amateurs and professionals. As mainstream television networks and studios seek new online outlets, Shapiro hopes to take advantage of their growing discontent with Internet giant YouTube. To that end, he has found an investor with... Read more...
Princeton has agreed to let Google digitize about 1 million public domain books which are no longer in copyright, into the enormous database that is Google Books. The project started two years ago, and aims to digitize many of the worlds books, allowing them to be searchable over the web. "The Web search leader said on Monday Princeton had agreed to work with it to digitize about 1 million public domain books -- works no longer covered by copyright protections. The combined collections of the university's libraries total more than 6 million printed works, 5 million manuscripts and 2 million nonprint items. A Google spokeswoman said her... Read more...
Organizing the world's information is a big job. The Library of Congress has been trying to do it for years. Is Google doing it better, for free? While Google talks to corporations and Wall Street about its desire and means to drive the sky's-the-limit profits to Google shareholder coffers, The Library of Congress reaches out to individuals and organizations for development "support" of "a key resource for an informed electorate." Google Inc.'s $150 billion market cap belies its corporate public serving mission statement. Nevertheless, Google's "philosophy" that "democracy on the web works" combined with its 50%+ search market share leads many to view Google as a public service and expect... Read more...
As we mentioned yesterday, Google is useful for all sorts of things you might not know about. Slate's Michael Agger has a fascinating rundown on one of the strangest and most controversial applications Google's got: searching through patents: Now that the buzz is wearing off, it's time to ask what Google Patents is actually good for. The wizards of Mountain View have stated that their corporate ethos is to organize all of human knowledge. But why is it that Google's search technology often seems like a killer app for ending pointless conversations? With the debut of Google Patents, a question from a cubicle mate along the line of, "Do... Read more...
All Hot Hardware lovers dream of a world of a enormously powerful processor with a command line. A baby is like that. So is Google: As Google nears 10,000 employees, though, it's become impossible to keep up with the 100 or so public products and projects that have come and gone. Some, like Gmail and Google Earth, are huge hits. Others, like the discontinued Google Answers, fizzle. In between are a few low-profile applications with real potential, most of which can be found on a mini-site called Google Labs. Here's my short list of Google's coolest obscure apps. A marvelous business, Google.... Read more...
Google's search engine has begun placing their own properties atop search engine results in the form of "Tips," ending its protocol of keeping advertisements and search results separate. Blake Ross of Firefox no likey: After all, Google is predicated on the idea that the democratic structure of the Web will push the cream to the top. Search for "photo sharing" and you should already get the highest quality services. According to Google, Picasa is not one of them. These "tips," then, can only be a tacit admission of failure: either the company does not believe in its own search technology, or it does not believe its products are good enough to rise to the top organically. I'd guess... Read more...
Jimmy Wales, founder of the immensely popular Wikipedia, has decided to build a rival search engine to compete with Google. He calls his new search engine Wikiasari. Like Wikipedia, the new search engine will rely on the support of a volunteer community of users. The idea is that Web surfers and programmers will be able to bring their collective intelligence to bear, to fine-tune search results and make the experience more effective for everyone. "If you search in Google, a lot of the results are very, very good and a lot of the results are very, very bad," says Wales. What that shows, Wales says, is that mathematical formulas alone do not produce... Read more...
People type all sorts of bizarre things into their search engines. Not all of them involve someone naked. But what exactly does Google know? Rather a lot, really, and not exactly what you might expect. Informit has a fabulous fifteen things Google knows, and it's fascinating. Here's one: Google Knows Mathematical Constants In addition to performing calculations, Google also knows a variety of mathematical and scientific constants, such as pi, Avogadro's Number, and Planck's Constant. It also knows the radius of the Earth, the mass of the sun, the speed of light, the gravitational constant, and a lot more. For example, if you're not sure what the value of pi is, just enter pi into the... Read more...
Google's Gmail has been available for some time now, though up until now it's always held onto the Beta tag. Google has ended their long Beta test of Gmail, and now anyone can sign up for the service without the need for an invitation or cell registration. If you're still one of those folks without a Gmail account, head on over for your free 2.7GB+ of e-mail storage.... Read more...
Not really. But Google has pioneered the business model of giving away a service for the privilege of showing you a small advertisement. They think the time is about right for cell phones to do the same. Web search leader Google Inc.'s chief executive, Eric Schmidt, sees a future where mobile phones are free to consumers who accept watching targeted forms of advertising. Schmidt said Saturday that as mobile phones become more like handheld computers and consumers spend as much as eight to 10 hours a day talking, texting and using the Web on these devices, advertising becomes a viable form of subsidy. "Your mobile phone should be free," Schmidt told Reuters. "It just makes sense that subsidies... Read more...
Looking to expand their presence on the airwaves, Google has been hiring folks for their radio sales department in an attempt to expand their advertising in offline media. There's also been some rumor of a possible Google buyout of Clear Channel, though Clear Channel has declined to comment on the issue. This all comes as Google plans to start testing their Google Audio Ads by the end of this year. "It made a clear move into radio in January when it agreed to pay more than $1 billion, depending on performance, for dMarc Broadcasting Inc., which connects advertisers to radio stations through an automated advertising system. It's all part... Read more...
Pretty soon we're all just going to have to admit we got the message, and do our jobs. Google isn't making plausible deniability any easier;now it's a snap to get Gmail on our portable gizmos: Gmail for Mobile Devices is a free, downloadable Java application that will work on any Java-enabled mobile phone, of which there are about 300 in the United States, said Tony Hsieh, product manager for Google Mobile. The software improves on a version of Gmail released nearly a year ago that lets people access their e-mail through a mobile Web browser. Once the new Java application is installed on a phone, a person can quickly launch... Read more...
 Google is going to make Microsoft look like a lemonade stand if they keep releasing useful things at the rate they're going. The latest is a customizable search engine: Not satisfied that it has given Web users enough tools to refine data on the Internet, Google will launch Custom Search Engine Tuesday, a product designed to cull search results from only those sites specified by the searcher. Users who create their own topic-specific search engines with the new tool, and share them via a search box on a web site, will be able to make money from ads placed by Google (nasdaq: GOOG - news - people ) on search result pages as part of the company's revenue-sharing AdSense program. Now that... Read more...
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