Items tagged with glass

The future successes of wearable computing are uncertain at this point, but as we discussed back in August, some research firms do believe that shipping values could skyrocket over the next couple of years. In particular, IHS predicts that 10 million "smart glasses" alone will ship between 2012 - 2016 - intriguing, given the fact that a mere 126,000 of those will ship in 2013. Regardless of whether or not solutions like Google Glass are going to take over the world, it appears that Microsoft isn't planning on sitting idly by and risk missing a major opportunity. According to sources close to the Wall Street Journal, Microsoft has already been working on a prototype Glass competitor, though absolutely... Read more...
The issues of security and privacy should always be on our minds, but ever since the revelation of NSA spying played out this past summer, those issues have been forced to the forefront - impossible to avoid. In reality, that's a great thing... we should be concerned about our privacy and definitely about our security. No one likes being spied on, after all. Most people would never be comfortable with this reality, especially if it's the government behind it. Not long after Google announced its Glass project - wearable glasses that are in effect a computer - concerns began to grow about their effect on privacy. With the ability to record video, the risks are obvious. It's been argued that people... Read more...
There's been a ton of hoopla surrounding Google Glass and the potential privacy issues the platform raises, but lost in all the negatively about the search giant's wearable computing device is the potential it offers for learning and innovation. Serving as a reminder of why technology rocks, a surgeon at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center became the first in the United States to consult with a distant colleague using live, point-of-view video from the operating room courtesy of Google Glass. "It’s a privilege to be a part of this project as we explore how this exciting new technology might be incorporated into the everyday care of our patients," said Dr. Christopher Kaeding,... Read more...
If you're planning to jump on the Google Glass bandwagon once the product ships to consumers, you're likely to be pleased to know that it's not going to be setting you back a cool $1,000+ like the developer kits would have. According to a researcher based in Taipei, the same city Glass' displays are likely to be manufactured, estimates are that the consumer model will carry a price-tag of $299. Given what we've heard from others in the past, and Google itself, $299 does seem to sound reasonable. According to a China Post article, the display manufacturer Himax (which Google has purchased a 6.3% stake of) states it will cost between $30 - $35 to make the display - a little interesting since you... Read more...
It seems like every major consumer electronics company is considering some form of wearable technology at this point. Google Glass has truly launched the segment into the limelight, and with rumors of an iWatch from Apple going strong, we're also hearing now that Dell is casting a glance in that same direction. As tablet sales for Dell flounder, the computer maker is now suggesting that it's "exploring ideas" in the wearable sector. Dell itself has lost a ton of luster as the conventional PC business shrinks, and it has yet to find a market to really thrive in in the post-PC world. Sam Burd, Dell's global vice-president of personal computing, told The Guardian that the wearable computing space... Read more...
Still unclear about this whole Glass thing from Google? Don't worry, you're not alone. In part to address privacy concerns and offer some clarity to its Glass project, Google recently posted an extensive FAQ page broken up into four categories. It addresses general Glass questions, specifications, security and privacy concerns, and questions about the software. If you haven't been following Glass much, if at all, then consider this a must-read primer if you're at all interested in being introduced to the project. And if you're already familiar with Glass, you might want to skip straight to the Security and Privacy section, especially in light of all the concerns that have been raised on the web.... Read more...
Happen to own both a Tesla Model S and Google Glass? Alright - let's be honest, the number could no doubt be counted on two hands, but if you happen to be one of those fingers, there's an app designed just for you. It's designed by Sahas Katta, and called, quite simply, "Glass Tesla", and is touted as being "Wearable Computing Meets the Electric Car". While its reach is going to be minimal at this point, it's a perfect example of what we could expect from technology like this down the road. These examples will explain everything: With Glass, you could easily keep up on your Model S' charge and predicted mileage, get directions, check up on temperatures, and also see if your car is locked or unlocked... Read more...
Google and many tech manufacturers for that matter lately, have been evangelizing the mantra that technology is here to enhance and improve our lives, not get in the way; in the truest sense to "serve humanity." Recent events and breakthroughs in the healthcare industry, which make use of leading-edge technology, illustrate this vision better than any marketing or ad campaign could ever possibly hope to. A 3D-Printed Tracheal Splint that saves a baby's life is a pretty wonderful advancement; and now a surgeon from the New England area has taken Google Glass into the operating room to record and stream a procedure, in an effort to show it can be done and showcase the possible benefits of "Telemedicine."... Read more...
When you first see Google Glass, your imagination runs wild with all of the possibilities. Sure, the obvious ones come to mind: looking at navigation routes and incoming e-mail right on your face, but what about an even more obvious one? We're talking about using Glass to recognize the face that's staring at you. Lambda Labs is getting ready to help Glass users accomplish just that, with a new API that should enable facial recognition using the existing Explorer Edition hardware. Over 1,000 developers are already using its existing API, but plugging it into Glass seems like the most advanced use yet. Once it's applied to Glass, users would (in theory) be able to remember faces, find friends in... Read more...
The verdict remains out on whether or not Google Glass is going to change our lives forever, but one thing's for certain: it's done a splendid job of drumming up lots of conversation. With its growing featureset, Glass has the capabilities of offering an unparalleled level of convenience to its wearers, but there's one side-effect feature that's not touted on the package: weirding out everyone around you. At its developer conference held this past week, Google held four discussions about Glass - none of which tackled privacy or other risks that the product exposes. While it's clear that the company hasn't had much to say about the issues up to this point, it's not going to be able to avoid them... Read more...
As of right now, Google Glass really isn't a rock-star device for those who aren't carrying an Android phone. As you'd expect, Glass is most compatible with Android, and while it'll pair with an iPhone over Bluetooth, functionality is quite limited. But it looks like that's going to change. According to a report from TechCrunch, the Glass headset will soon be able to support messaging and navigation with products other than Android. It's unclear how exactly Google plans to do this, and if it'll happen on the Explorer Edition or just on the eventual consumer version. But, it seems quite wise of Google to make such a move. Tying Glass to Android would restrict its usage for sure, and Google has... Read more...
Google's consumer version of Glass has yet to even ship -- in fact, many of those who registered to order one at Google I/O 2012 have yet to receive their order form. But that's not stopping the search giant from getting as much information on Glass out there as possible. Wearable computing is likely to have a massive impact on consumers at large in the years ahead, with some apt to select the wristwatch while others create computers that you wear on your face. Glass has captivated the masses, with some being giddy about its potential and others being terrified of the privacy issues. And if you're interested for one reason or another, you owe it to yourself to check out a new video uploaded by... Read more...
Google just started up the production line for the first Explorer Edition Glass headsets, but up until now, it remained a mystery as to what was powering everything. Was it a version of Chrome? A flavor of Android? Something else entirely? Wonder no more. The company's CEO (Larry Page) finally let the world know about the engine behind the wearable computer, saying the following on this week's earnings call: "Obviously, Glass runs on Android, so [Android] has been pretty transportable across devices, and I think that will continue.” He was answering a slightly unrelated question, but nevertheless, the answer is now out there. We don't know yet what version of Android is onboard, nor if... Read more...
Guess what? No sooner than Google announced that Glass Explorer Edition headsets were in production, it appears that select users have received a set. And this offers up the first glimpse into a world dominated by wearable technology. The $1500 package includes the Glass headset, a micro-USB cable + charger, a pouch and attachable shades. But here's what is really important: the video. This particular user strapped his Glass headset on during a ride at a local Go Kart track. It's one of the cooler ways to debut the technology, and while the resulting footage doesn't look much different than what you'd get if strapping a GoPro atop your helmet, we're excited about where things could go from here.... Read more...
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