Items tagged with folding@home

The number of people actively participating in the Folding@home distributed computing project has ballooned over the past month, and that has been a boon for research into COVID-19/coronavirus. When we last visited Folding@home, the project had surpassed the 1 exaFLOP barrier, making the collective faster than even the most powerful supercomputers on the planet. This week, however, it was announced that Folding@home has now reached 2.4 exaFLOPS, more than doubling the record set in late March. To put that in perspective, that's faster than the top 500 supercomputers on Earth... combined. One exaFLOP is equal to 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 operations per second, which is almost... Read more...
Just a few days ago, the Folding@home distributed computing project had reached 470 petaFLOPS of cumulative compute power, topping out the output of the seven fastest supercomputers in the world. And now? Thanks to a continued surge in activity from users joining the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, Folding@home has more than doubled the amount of data it crunching, and is in exaFLOP territory. "Thanks to our AMAZING community, we've crossed the exaFLOP barrier! That's over 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 operations per second, making us ~10x faster than the IBM Summit!," Folding@home announced on Twitter. That's 18 zeros, folks. To put that figure into perspective, the collective effort of... Read more...
The Folding@home network has been working hard to defeat COVID-19 (coronavirus). This battle has caused the network to pass some interesting milestones as result of renewed interest in folding for a cure or vaccine. The Folding@home network now boasts 470 PetaFLOPS of compute power and is more powerful than the world’s top 7 supercomputers. Folding@home is a “distributed computing” project. It was started by Dr. Vijay Pande at Stanford University and is now based at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine. The project relies on the processing power of volunteer personal devices that process “different portions of data” simultaneously. The Folding@home... Read more...
Earlier this week, we told you about Stanford University's Folding@home project, which is now providing CPU-based projects and workloads that you can use for COVID-19 (coronavirus) folding to battle the pandemic disease. Plenty of enthusiasts are open to using their spare CPU cycles for a good cause, and interest has been running high. Now, however, NVIDIA has issued a call to action for enthusiasts with GPUs -- that should be most of you out there reading this -- to join in on the efforts. More specifically, NVIDIA is urging folks to join the PC Master Race (PCMR) team to put idle GPU resources to good use to fold for coronavirus-specific GPU projects. However you... Read more...
As the coronavirus continues to spread, Standford University's Folding@home project announced that CPU-based protein folding COVID-19 jobs are headed to the distributed computing client. For those who wish to do so, this means they can donate their unused CPU cycles to potentially critical research into the coronavirus. The idea behind distributed computing is drawing strength in numbers. While one solitary PC may have little impact on intense research, especially compared to something like a supercomputer, distributed computing draws from hundreds, thousands, or even millions of PCs, each one sharing valuable resources towards a goal. Folding@home focuses on disease research that simulates protein... Read more...