Items tagged with Flash

ASUS developing an SSD? Surprising, isn't it? Well it shouldn't be. After all, the company makes everything from notebooks to smartphones to motherboards to graphics cards to monitors to optical drives to keyboards and mice to routers to audio cards to... alright, I need to stop myself. Given ASUS' huge enthusiast focus, moving into the SSD territory makes sense, but instead of going the "normal" route of starting off with 2.5" SATA models, ASUS has decided to reveal a PCIe product under its Republic of Gamers branding. Marco first introduced us to this upcoming SSD, dubbed RAIDR Express, at CES earlier this year, but details then were quite scarce. In fact, they're still quite scarce, but with... Read more...
Desktops and data centers are two very different beasts, and what's true of one might not be true of the other. For example, even though solid state drive (SSD) pricing has fallen dramatically in past year, it's still cheaper to equip a desktop or laptop system with a mechanical hard disk drive (HDD). The same isn't necessarily true when it comes to data centers, and if you ask IBM, the company will tell you that flash-based storage makes more economical sense at this point. How can that be? Part of the reason is because flash storage doesn't contain any moving parts, thereby making it a more reliable and durable solution, IBM says. Flash storage is also more energy efficient and doesn't require... Read more...
You've got to love hacker conferences. Software vulnerabilities are never going away, that much is obvious, but it's with competitions at hacker conferences where we can really see just how vulnerable the software we use every single day is. Putting this into perspective, prior to the Pwn2Own conference in Canada, Google patched-up ten bugs in Chrome - six of which were considered severe. Despite that, Chrome was hit with a zero-day during the conference that granted code execution in the browser's sandbox renderer process. Chrome is hardly the only guilty party, however. Equally-severe exploits were presented for IE 10 under Windows 8, IE 9 under Windows 7, Firefox under Windows 7... Read more...
OCZ has released more details of the VXL 1.3 cache and virtualization software it teased before this week’s CeBIT 2013 in Hannover, Germany, and the upgraded offering includes virtualized “SAN-less”, highly available, fault tolerant environments courtesy of the software’s new synchronous data mirroring capabilities. The idea is to prevent data loss and virtual machine downtime at all times. The software maintains two identical, live copies of virtual machine data by mirroring the information across OCZ Z-Drive R4 PCIe cards (have a peek at our review of the card for more info), which accomplishes the task of keeping two copies of the data and also leverages the PCIe cards’... Read more...
We've long since wondered when SSDs would hit a price (and size) threshold that most mainstream consumers would opt for one over a conventional HDD. We're still a few years out from that, we imagine, but you can see the writing on the wall. Seagate, one of the world's largest storage companies, already has a mind to kill off the 2.5" (laptop-sized) 7200RPM hard drive from its portfolio. Why? Flash storage is taking off in a major way for portables, while desktops still seem to favor slow-but-huge in many cases. Moreover, the introduction of the hybrid HDD (part flash, part HDD) has made getting a taste of flash a little cheaper. David Burks, director of marketing and product management at Seagate... Read more...
Samsung has roughly a trillion or so different products in virtually every market of the computing world, but one area where the company can occasionally be overlooked is in consumer storage. Samsung SSDs are plentiful, though, most notably inside of Apple’s MacBooks, and unlike many SSDs out there, they’re built entirely with Samsung-made components, from the controller to the Flash NAND and DRAM cache. In fact, Samsung is one of the largest Flash memory suppliers in the world. In any case, the latest generation of Samsung SSDs is the 840 and 840 Pro Series, and we took the 250GB version of the 840 SSD for a spin. Not literally, of course, because these aren’t HDDs. (Nerd joke.)... Read more...
Samsung has roughly a trillion or so different products in virtually every market of the computing world, but one area where the company can occasionally be overlooked is in consumer storage. Samsung SSDs are plentiful, though, most notably inside of Apple’s MacBooks, and unlike many SSDs out there, they’re built entirely with Samsung-made components, from the controller to the Flash NAND and DRAM cache. In fact, Samsung is one of the largest Flash memory suppliers in the world. There may be an advantage in keeping all your hens in one house, so to speak, as this ostensibly gives Samsung the ability to adjust to any problems more quickly than if it had to, for example, harangue the... Read more...
Before reading on, we must warn you that your next 20 minutes should be free, because once you discover the Flash tool "Scale of the Universe", that's just about the amount of time you'll need before you'll be able to focus on other things. Its goal is to help put the universe into perspective, size-wise, from top-to-bottom. If you like having your mind blown, then this tool should be right up your alley. Crafted by brothers Cary and Michael Huang, the tool starts out rather unassuming. There's a human, a Dodo bird and a beach ball. It's not until you grab the slider bar down below that you really see what this is made of. Drag it left, and you zoom into smaller and smaller objects - slide it... Read more...
Corsair tends to be somewhat measured in their approach to certain markets and only enters them with products that are clearly differentiated from the competition. That’s true for their cases, peripherals, power supplies, and many other product lines. Corsair, however, has been relatively adventurous in regard to Solid State Drives. Over the last few years, Corsair has offered SSDs built around controllers from virtually all of the major players, including Marvell, SandForce, Indilinx, and Samsung, among others. While Corsair has been open to working with multiple controller designs, they have not typically be first to market with drives based on brand new controllers. But that all changed... Read more...
Corsair tends to be somewhat measured in their approach to certain markets and only enters them with products that are clearly differentiated from the competition. That’s true for their cases, peripherals, power supplies, and many other product lines. Corsair, however, has been relatively adventurous in regard to Solid State Drives. Over the last few years, Corsair has offered SSDs built around controllers from virtually all of the major players, including Marvell, SandForce, Indilinx, and Samsung, among others. While Corsair has been open to working with multiple controller designs, they have not typically be first to market with drives based on brand new controllers. But that all... Read more...
Fusion-io's ioDrive line has become an icon in its own right, proving that all-flash storage solutions -- while pricey -- do fit in our world. Now, the company is taking yet another swipe at the market (citing a target of "webscale" customers) with the introduction of ioScale. This unit was previously exclusive to Fusion-io customers outfitting thousands of servers, but  is now available for hyperscale and cloud companies in minimum order quantities of only one hundred units. Each ioScale provides up to 3.2 terabytes of reliable Fusion ioMemory capacity that is performance tuned for the unique needs of webscale environments. With prices starting at $3.89 USD per gigabyte with increasing... Read more...
EMC has been talking publicly about an all-flash datacenter storage array for about a year and a half, and the company has put its money where its mouth is, so to speak, by developing acquiring flash array maker XtremIO this spring and developing flash products such as its VCache enterprise flash storage. Project X, the code name for this all-flash endeavor, is coming to market in 2013. Although flash technology has been used in the enterprise for some time, EMC says that Project X is about building a complete storage, server, and software solution from the ground up based on flash instead of merely integrating flash technology into existing structures, such as in a hybrid array that relies on... Read more...
For about as long as it's existed, Adobe's Flash plugin has been one of the most vulnerable pieces of software on the planet. Much like an operating system itself, most people readily install a Flash plugin soon after a fresh install, so it's no wonder that people are often on the hunt to see what kind of exploits can be had. It's for this reason that Adobe releases updates frequently, and one of the reasons people are often annoyed with the company. As the Dos Equis man would say, "I don't always have to update Adobe software - oh wait, I do." In an update to its quarterly security report, Kapersky has awarded 4 of the top 10 places in a list of serious vulnerabilities to Flash/Shockwave. This... Read more...
Most of the PCIe SSD cards on the market today, with the exception of products from Fusion-io, still rely on SATA or SAS-based NAND controllers to interface on the backend of the device to the NAND array. PCIe cards from OCZ, Intel, LSI and others use controllers from LSI SandForce or the like.  Fusion-io was the first company to introduce a true native PCI Express to NAND processor employed in their products, though Micron has also been cooking up their own native PCIe SSD technology for some time now. Today we're looking at the Micron P320h, a PCI Express SSD that was introduced to the market well over a year ago and has actually been shipping to OEM customers for some time, but is just... Read more...
We've often spoken about the future of SSD technology eventually evolving away from "bridged" interfaces like SATA and SAS, to direct-attached, native interfaces like PCI Express.  It just makes sense.  With the ultra-fast random access times and high IO bandwidth of solid state storage, it's not the storage media itself that's the limiting factor, rather, non-native interfaces get in the way and become the bottleneck. A SAS or SATA controller still has to have its protocol translated over to PCIe so the host can talk to it, which wastes precious bandwidth and adds latency. Most of the PCIe SSD cards on the market today, with the exception of products from Fusion-io,... Read more...
ZTE may not be a well-known brand in the US yet, but the company is definitely beginning to gain traction as it introduces more and more devices. While we've seen some low-cost ZTE phones in the past with entry-level specs, the latest leak shows a high-end phone designed for Sprint. The purported ZTE Flash could be coming to Sprint as early as October 14, 2012. This smartphone is said to feature a dual-core 1.5GHz processor, a 4.5-inch HD (1,280x720 pixels) IPS display, 1GB of RAM, and a 12.6-megapixel camera with autofocus and LED flash. Other key features include LTE support for connectivity to Sprint's newest 4G network as well as Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. The handset is also said to... Read more...
The need for speed isn't lost on us -- we're always yearning for an SSD, RAM module, you name it, with faster throughput. It doesn't end when it comes to flash cards, as the demand placed on HD-DSLRs is getting quite severe now that 1080p30 video is the norm. With more and more DSLR cameras able to shoot HD video, the CompactFlash Association recognizes that there will be an increasing need for speed in future cards. In fact, as the typical CF card is taking a backseat to XQD (a format that's just breaking through, and is featured alongside the CF card in Nikon's D4), the CompactFlash Association has seen fit to buddy up with what's next. The CFA this week announced the development of the XQD... Read more...
There's fast, and then there's really fast. And with that second bit comes Sony's newest memory cards. The XQD format still isn't a hot one just yet, only being supported by a handful of cameras (Nikon's D4 included). The new S-Series caters to early adopters on the bleeding edge, offered in 32GB and 64GB sizes and reaching transfer rates as high as 168MB/sec. If you want to take advantage of that speed, you'll need a Thunderbolt bolt. Take that, USB. All of that speed comes at a price, of course. The 32GB card is set to ship for $503, while the 64GB version goes for $754. Kind of like the early days of SSD: everyone wants the speed, but who is really going to pony up for it?... Read more...
Last November, Adobe announced plans to discontinue development of the Flash Player for mobile devices. Now, Adobe is letting users know a little bit more about what they can expect moving forward. For starters, Adobe will not be offering any certified implementations of Flash Player for Android 4.1. In addition, starting August 15th, Adobe plans to use the configuration settings in the Google Play Store to limit access to Flash Player updates to devices that already have Flash player installed. In other words, if you want Flash Player on your Android phone and you don't already have it, make sure you install it before August 15. An Update on Flash Player and Android We announced last November... Read more...
Ever heard of Schooner Information Technology? Now you have. That company was just acquired by SanDisk, a company you're surely familiar with. Schooner is a Silicon Valley-based company that develops flash-optimized database and data store solutions. The release states that "Schooner's products complement SanDisk's growing portfolio of enterprise solid state disk (SSD) and flash-optimized software offerings that enable customers to accelerate the performance of data-intensive applications and reduce overall cost of ownership." What's the mean in English? Well, SanDisk will be picking up a team of database and flash optimization experts, and it's products will be finely tuned to mesh well with... Read more...
New Windows 8-based machines aren't all that's new this week: Toshiba Storage Products has just announced a new lineup of solid state drives (SSDs) that provides both high performance and energy efficiency for the most data-intensive and energy-sensitive applications. These are geared for enterprise use, with the THNSNF drives being the world’s first to take advantage of 19nm process NAND flash memory. 2012 is also a milestone year for the company, as it marks the 25th anniversary of Toshiba's invention of NAND Flash memory. But back to the product at hand: THNSNF series employs Toggle MLC (multi-level cell) NAND flash, which delivers significantly faster performance than competing SSDs... Read more...
Solid State Drives are a fabulous way to boost a system's performance, but for all their strong points, they aren't an easy upgrade for a lot of people. Performance can vary significantly between manufacturers, only the most expensive drives can replace the need for an HDD in an enthusiast / data-heavy system, and reinstalling a full suite of software from scratch is a major headache. Corsair's Accelerator Series family of SSDs is designed to reduce the barriers to the SSD option by offering a solution that's accessible without the need to wipe your existing HDD or create a storage plan that ensures you make the best possible use of a small SSD, while leaving the bulk of your data on a rotating... Read more...
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