Items tagged with FCC

In case you've been living under the proverbial rock, then you know that December 14th is a big day for anyone in the United States that uses the internet on the daily basis (meaning, the vast majority of Americans). FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has made it clear that the current net neutrality rules that govern how internet traffic is regulated are unnecessary, anti-business, and a prime example of government overreach. As a result, the vote late this week will in effect kill net neutrality as we know it. In a last-ditch effort to save the internet, defenders of net neutrality are staging a "Break the Internet" campaign tomorrow, December 12th. The purpose of the campaign is to prompt Congress... Read more...
It's official. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has officially penciled in December 14th as the date that it will roll back the net neutrality provisions that were ushered in under former Chairman Tom Wheeler. A procedural vote was held earlier this year paved that the way for this dramatic action to be taken by the FCC. Current FCC Chairman Ajit Pai claims that dismantling net neutrality rules is a pro-business move that will be boon for innovation and in fact, he calls his plan the "Restoring Internet Freedom Order". In his opinion, regulation of the internet should be handled with a "light touch" with fewer, rather than more regulations. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai (Image Source: Department... Read more...
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), led by Chairman Ajit Pai, is set to vote on whether it should dismantle net neutrality rules that were put in place under the Obama administration. As this has become a political issue, the FCC is assuredly going to proceed with Pai's plan to withdraw the rules, after having voted 2-1 back in May of this year to advance the process. A final vote is scheduled for December 14.In case you are not aware, net neutrality rules were put in place to ensure that all Internet traffic is treated equally and fairly. Through government regulation, wireless carriers and Internet service providers (ISPs) are prohibited from throttling or blocking online content,... Read more...
Apple is under pressure from various sources to activate the FM radio in iPhone handsets, in the name of public safety. Federal Communications Commission chairman Ajit Pai is among those encouraging Apple to "step up to the plate and put the safety of the American people first." In his open letter to Apple, Pai brought up a rash of recent natural disasters, including Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. The only problem with is request is that newer iPhone models do not have an FM chip. The reason for wanting smartphone makers to activate FM chips is so that people who find themselves in an emergency situation can receive potentially life-saving information, as Pai points out in his letter. And... Read more...
Google is taking an interesting strategy with its next generation Pixel devices, the Pixel 2 and Pixel XL 2. Around this time last month, a filing with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) revealed that HTC is the manufacturer behind the Pixel 2. Now we have learned that LG is producing the Pixel XL 2 rather than HTC, which was also confirmed by an FCC filing. Both phones have not yet been formally announced.This time around the FCC filing is quite as fleshed out as the last one. However, it does provide some goodies. The filing lists the FCC ID as ZNFG011C, which is a combination of LG's FCC grantee code (ZNF) and the phone's model number (G011C). If you are wondering where the G011B... Read more...
The sleuths over at reddit have dug around inside the FCC documents library and unearthed what appear to be details on the Google Pixel 2 smartphone, which is built by HTC. Much of the details that the FCC offers are mundane testing reports that shed little information on what the device will offer consumers when it lands. However, there does appear to be at least one link that offers scant detail on the device. The information includes some screenshots from the Settings menu of the smartphone that show us how to get to the FCC labels inside the menu. What we can glean from those setting is that the test device runs Android 8.0.1 and that it also features Active Edge. Something worth noting is... Read more...
You might think that an agency such as the Federal Communications Commission would exist for no other reason than to protect consumers, but that hasn't proven to be the case at all when it comes to our online rights. You might be tired of hearing about net neutrality - and we couldn't even blame you - but now more than ever, we can't let down our guard. To reiterate what net neutrality is supposed to do: it's to treat our internet access as a Title II utility, classifying it the same way our phones and power are. That is to say that companies can't charge whatever they want for whatever they want - there are guidelines. And for companies like Verizon and Comcast, they feel that those guidelines... Read more...
The space above Earth is about to get a little more crowded. The FCC has recently granted approval to OneWeb to launch over 720 Internet-beaming satellites into orbit. OneWeb is “the first satellite constellation of its kind to receive approval from the full commission.” The low-Earth orbit satellites will employ on-geostationary satellite orbit (NGSO) technology. OneWeb as a company is backed by some industry heavy-hitters as well, with Dr. Paul Jacobs, Executive Chairman of Qualcomm and Sir Richard Branson, Founder of Virgin Group, among others residing on its Board of Directors. Image from: OneWebOneWeb was granted 7 GHz of spectrum in 1997 by the United Nations International Telecommunications... Read more...
It's amazing just how fast politics can move when corporate interests are at risk. Merely two years ago, we reported on the Federal Communication Commission's approval of clear net neutrality rules - a major win for the open Internet. It didn't take long before parties inside and outside the FCC got to work on trying to derail that win. Today, newly appointed FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to undo these rules and regulations has been given a favorable vote. It's important to note that just because Pai's proposal has been given an initial collective nod, doesn't mean that net neutrality rules immediately cease to exist, as the details still need to be examined closely before a final vote... Read more...
Silicon Valley is pushing back against Washington D.C., and for good reason. A lobbying group representing tech titans such as Google, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, and Microsoft recently released a document in favor of net neutrality. The Internet Association (IA) indicated that it supported the 2015 Open Internet Order. The IA’s report stated, “The internet industry is uniform in its belief that net neutrality preserves the consumer experience, competition, and innovation online. Consumers want and need their internet experience preserved and protected, regardless of the legal or regulatory mechanism.” Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has argued that he would prefer for broadband... Read more...
Passengers on commercial airplanes will not be making phone calls from their smartphones while in-flight anytime soon. Technological barriers notwithstanding, Federal Communications Commission chairman Ajit Pai is withdrawing a proposal introduced in 2013 by his predecessor that would have allowed air travelers to use their handsets for voice communication at high altitudes. Pai called the proposal "ill-conceived," adding that it was not in the best interest of the public who would rather have peace and quiet rather than listen to others chatter on their phones while taking to the skies. "I do not believe that moving forward with this plan is in the public interest," Pai said in a statement.... Read more...
When it comes to a bill that was passed both in the U.S. House and Senate that would kill off FCC rules pertaining to internet privacy, consumers are understandably somewhat upset and confused about what this all actually means. The FCC rules, which were ratified late last year, would require internet service providers (ISPs) to gain consent from customers before sharing or selling web browsing data and other identifiable information with third-parties. Lawmakers in the majority argued that the FCC overstepped its authority and that ISPs were being subject to regulations that don’t apply to companies like Google and Facebook (which both make money based on customer behavior via ads). However,... Read more...
Privacy is hard to come by on the Internet, that's just the way it is. But hey, at least wireless carries and Internet service providers (ISPs) are not selling your browsing history without your permission right? Well, we're sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but the House of Representatives narrowly voted 215-205 to repeal broadband privacy rules that were recently introduced under the Obama administration. The bill eked a majority vote among party lines in the Senate (50-48) last week before it headed to the House of Representatives. In both cases, a simple majority vote was needed to pass the bill. Having received the necessary votes in both cases, the bill will now be sent to President Donald... Read more...
Earlier this month, we told you about a Senate bill that would undo what had been deemed overreaching “midnight regulations” by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that were aimed at protecting consumer privacy. Today, the Senate voted along party lines (50-48) to kill the FCC measure that would require ISPs to gain consent before sharing customers' browsing data. The bill was authored by Senator Jeff Flake (R-AZ), Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law. The vote to dismantle the FCC’s privacy rules was the result of the Congressional Review Act, which gives Congress the power to scrap nascent rules that have been passed by federal agencies. If... Read more...
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