Items tagged with FCC

Do you need any further proof that Samsung's upcoming Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9+ flagships are right around the corner? Well, both smartphones recently made a visit to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) with SM-G960F and SM-G965F designations for the Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9+ respectively. We should note that this early appearance at the FCC by Samsung's latest flagships is unprecedented. Droid-Life notes that the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy Note received their certifications in March 2017 and July 2017 respectively, and went on sale in April and August respectively in the United States. The Galaxy S7, which received its FCC certification in February 2016 went on sale a month later. What about... Read more...
Energous is a company that has been working on what many people have lusted after for years: true wireless charging of devices. We aren’t talking about having to sit your smartphone or other device down on a pad to charge them without having to fiddle with wires; that has been available for many years now. What Energous is talking about is wireless charging through the air. That means you leave your smartphone in your bag or pocket and it would charge automatically. The tech is called WattUp, and is wire-free power-at-a-distance charging technology. The FCC granted the company the first certification of its kind in the industry for the first-generation WattUp mid field transmitter.... Read more...
What happened yesterday was outrageous. Officials at the FCC voted 3-2 to repeal net neutrality rules enacted during the previous administration, stripping away consumer protections against ISP abuse. The vote ignored a public outcry that had grown loud and clear leading up to the vote, one that included voices from many of the Internet's pioneers, along with 18 state attorney's general and tens of millions of people from all walks of life, both Republicans and Democrats. The process was a farce, though the fight for net neutrality is not over. Yes, net neutrality advocates lost a battle yesterday. And yes, when the ink dries and the red tape clears, ISPs and wireless carriers will be free to... Read more...
FCC chairman Ajit Pai was supposed to be receptive to public feedback on his proposal to repeal net neutrality rules that are currently in place, rules that prevent ISPs and wireless carriers from blocking or throttling Internet traffic based on content, among other things. Instead, he has repeatedly made it clear that the whole process is a farce. The latest example of that is a cheeky video featuring Pai in a Santa Claus suit telling us all the things we can do on the web once is no longer neutral. This would be fine, if someone else or some other agency put together the video, and it didn't star Pai. The gist of the argument is that net neutrality advocates are overreacting, and that once... Read more...
There is no need to worry about an open internet going the way of the dinosaur. All of the commotion surrounding the FCC's vote to dismantle net neutrality rules -- which will take place today -- amounts to Frank Drebin's "Nothing to see here" moment in the original The Naked Gun film. Well, that's at least the opinion of Michael Powell (son of four star general Colin Powell), who served as FCC chairman under the Bush administration. Powell argues that activists that have come out against the FCC -- and chairman Ajit Pai in particular -- are akin to "new-age Nostradamuses [predicting] the internet will stop working, democracy will collapse, plague will ensue and locusts will cover the land."... Read more...
In case you've been living under the proverbial rock, then you know that December 14th is a big day for anyone in the United States that uses the internet on the daily basis (meaning, the vast majority of Americans). FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has made it clear that the current net neutrality rules that govern how internet traffic is regulated are unnecessary, anti-business, and a prime example of government overreach. As a result, the vote late this week will in effect kill net neutrality as we know it. In a last-ditch effort to save the internet, defenders of net neutrality are staging a "Break the Internet" campaign tomorrow, December 12th. The purpose of the campaign is to prompt Congress... Read more...
It's official. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has officially penciled in December 14th as the date that it will roll back the net neutrality provisions that were ushered in under former Chairman Tom Wheeler. A procedural vote was held earlier this year paved that the way for this dramatic action to be taken by the FCC. Current FCC Chairman Ajit Pai claims that dismantling net neutrality rules is a pro-business move that will be boon for innovation and in fact, he calls his plan the "Restoring Internet Freedom Order". In his opinion, regulation of the internet should be handled with a "light touch" with fewer, rather than more regulations. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai (Image Source: Department... Read more...
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), led by Chairman Ajit Pai, is set to vote on whether it should dismantle net neutrality rules that were put in place under the Obama administration. As this has become a political issue, the FCC is assuredly going to proceed with Pai's plan to withdraw the rules, after having voted 2-1 back in May of this year to advance the process. A final vote is scheduled for December 14.In case you are not aware, net neutrality rules were put in place to ensure that all Internet traffic is treated equally and fairly. Through government regulation, wireless carriers and Internet service providers (ISPs) are prohibited from throttling or blocking online content,... Read more...
Apple is under pressure from various sources to activate the FM radio in iPhone handsets, in the name of public safety. Federal Communications Commission chairman Ajit Pai is among those encouraging Apple to "step up to the plate and put the safety of the American people first." In his open letter to Apple, Pai brought up a rash of recent natural disasters, including Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. The only problem with is request is that newer iPhone models do not have an FM chip. The reason for wanting smartphone makers to activate FM chips is so that people who find themselves in an emergency situation can receive potentially life-saving information, as Pai points out in his letter. And... Read more...
Google is taking an interesting strategy with its next generation Pixel devices, the Pixel 2 and Pixel XL 2. Around this time last month, a filing with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) revealed that HTC is the manufacturer behind the Pixel 2. Now we have learned that LG is producing the Pixel XL 2 rather than HTC, which was also confirmed by an FCC filing. Both phones have not yet been formally announced.This time around the FCC filing is quite as fleshed out as the last one. However, it does provide some goodies. The filing lists the FCC ID as ZNFG011C, which is a combination of LG's FCC grantee code (ZNF) and the phone's model number (G011C). If you are wondering where the G011B... Read more...
The sleuths over at reddit have dug around inside the FCC documents library and unearthed what appear to be details on the Google Pixel 2 smartphone, which is built by HTC. Much of the details that the FCC offers are mundane testing reports that shed little information on what the device will offer consumers when it lands. However, there does appear to be at least one link that offers scant detail on the device. The information includes some screenshots from the Settings menu of the smartphone that show us how to get to the FCC labels inside the menu. What we can glean from those setting is that the test device runs Android 8.0.1 and that it also features Active Edge. Something worth noting is... Read more...
You might think that an agency such as the Federal Communications Commission would exist for no other reason than to protect consumers, but that hasn't proven to be the case at all when it comes to our online rights. You might be tired of hearing about net neutrality - and we couldn't even blame you - but now more than ever, we can't let down our guard. To reiterate what net neutrality is supposed to do: it's to treat our internet access as a Title II utility, classifying it the same way our phones and power are. That is to say that companies can't charge whatever they want for whatever they want - there are guidelines. And for companies like Verizon and Comcast, they feel that those guidelines... Read more...
The space above Earth is about to get a little more crowded. The FCC has recently granted approval to OneWeb to launch over 720 Internet-beaming satellites into orbit. OneWeb is “the first satellite constellation of its kind to receive approval from the full commission.” The low-Earth orbit satellites will employ on-geostationary satellite orbit (NGSO) technology. OneWeb as a company is backed by some industry heavy-hitters as well, with Dr. Paul Jacobs, Executive Chairman of Qualcomm and Sir Richard Branson, Founder of Virgin Group, among others residing on its Board of Directors. Image from: OneWebOneWeb was granted 7 GHz of spectrum in 1997 by the United Nations International Telecommunications... Read more...
It's amazing just how fast politics can move when corporate interests are at risk. Merely two years ago, we reported on the Federal Communication Commission's approval of clear net neutrality rules - a major win for the open Internet. It didn't take long before parties inside and outside the FCC got to work on trying to derail that win. Today, newly appointed FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to undo these rules and regulations has been given a favorable vote. It's important to note that just because Pai's proposal has been given an initial collective nod, doesn't mean that net neutrality rules immediately cease to exist, as the details still need to be examined closely before a final vote... Read more...
Silicon Valley is pushing back against Washington D.C., and for good reason. A lobbying group representing tech titans such as Google, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, and Microsoft recently released a document in favor of net neutrality. The Internet Association (IA) indicated that it supported the 2015 Open Internet Order. The IA’s report stated, “The internet industry is uniform in its belief that net neutrality preserves the consumer experience, competition, and innovation online. Consumers want and need their internet experience preserved and protected, regardless of the legal or regulatory mechanism.” Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai has argued that he would prefer for broadband... Read more...
Passengers on commercial airplanes will not be making phone calls from their smartphones while in-flight anytime soon. Technological barriers notwithstanding, Federal Communications Commission chairman Ajit Pai is withdrawing a proposal introduced in 2013 by his predecessor that would have allowed air travelers to use their handsets for voice communication at high altitudes. Pai called the proposal "ill-conceived," adding that it was not in the best interest of the public who would rather have peace and quiet rather than listen to others chatter on their phones while taking to the skies. "I do not believe that moving forward with this plan is in the public interest," Pai said in a statement.... Read more...
When it comes to a bill that was passed both in the U.S. House and Senate that would kill off FCC rules pertaining to internet privacy, consumers are understandably somewhat upset and confused about what this all actually means. The FCC rules, which were ratified late last year, would require internet service providers (ISPs) to gain consent from customers before sharing or selling web browsing data and other identifiable information with third-parties. Lawmakers in the majority argued that the FCC overstepped its authority and that ISPs were being subject to regulations that don’t apply to companies like Google and Facebook (which both make money based on customer behavior via ads). However,... Read more...
Privacy is hard to come by on the Internet, that's just the way it is. But hey, at least wireless carries and Internet service providers (ISPs) are not selling your browsing history without your permission right? Well, we're sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but the House of Representatives narrowly voted 215-205 to repeal broadband privacy rules that were recently introduced under the Obama administration. The bill eked a majority vote among party lines in the Senate (50-48) last week before it headed to the House of Representatives. In both cases, a simple majority vote was needed to pass the bill. Having received the necessary votes in both cases, the bill will now be sent to President Donald... Read more...
Earlier this month, we told you about a Senate bill that would undo what had been deemed overreaching “midnight regulations” by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that were aimed at protecting consumer privacy. Today, the Senate voted along party lines (50-48) to kill the FCC measure that would require ISPs to gain consent before sharing customers' browsing data. The bill was authored by Senator Jeff Flake (R-AZ), Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law. The vote to dismantle the FCC’s privacy rules was the result of the Congressional Review Act, which gives Congress the power to scrap nascent rules that have been passed by federal agencies. If... Read more...
If you listened to rap music in the early 1990s, you undoubtedly heard Flava Flav spit rhymes to "911 is a Joke," the song he is most famous for. However, it was no laughing matter when mobile phone users subscribed to AT&T's wireless service were unable to call 911 emergency dispatchers in more than a dozen states on Wednesday night. Service has since been restored, but given the seriousness of the situation, the FCC has opened an investigation into what went wrong. During the outage, law enforcement and emergency response officials were on social media warning people across the nation of the trouble AT&T was having. The outage lasted around five hours, with AT&T indicating at 10:30... Read more...
Many American congressman are determined to overturn the “midnight regulations” of the previous administration. The United States Senate’s latest bill proposal would reverse the Federal Communications Commission’s rules and allow ISPs to share private data without the consent of the consumer. Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law, remarked, “The FCC's midnight regulation does nothing to protect consumer privacy. It is unnecessary, confusing, and adds yet another innovation-stifling regulation to the Internet. My resolution is the first step toward restoring the FTC's light-touch, consumer-friendly approach. It will not... Read more...
Earlier this morning, we reported that Verizon is preparing to green light 5G wireless customer trials in the United States in mid-2017. T-Mobile isn’t quite ready to show its hand with regards to 5G wireless, but it is looking to extend LTE’s longevity with the launch of LTE-U this spring. LTE-U will allow T-Mobile customers to take advantage of 20MHz of “underutilized unlicensed spectrum” on the 5GHz band. T-Mobile says that this will expand capacity and allow it to offer even faster speeds on its nationwide wireless network. It will also provide a basis for T-Mobile’s plans to blanket the country with Gigabit LTE. T-Mobile has been field testing LTE-U since December 2016 in anticipation of... Read more...
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