Items tagged with EDS

HP has just announced that it will write off $8 billion dollars worth of goodwill due to poor performance of its Enterprise Services sector. In highly related news, the previous head of that segment, Jim Visentin, has quit to "pursue other opportunities." The move is seen as a readjustment in value of the properties HP acquired when it purchased Electronic Data Systems in 2008 for $13.2B. Do the math -- HP apparently thinks it overpaid, or is dubious of its long-term ability to compete with IBM. Visentin has been replaced by Mike Nefkens, with Jean-Jacques Charhon serving as chief operating officer for the embattled business unit. HP's $8B writeoff is an oddly high figure, given the performance... Read more...
SANDISK INTRODUCES ExtremeFFS – NEW FLASH MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR IMPROVING SSD PERFORMANCE AND RELIABILITY SanDisk Also Proposes Two Metrics for End-Users to Measure Performanceand Endurance: virtualRPM (vRPM) and Long-Term Data Endurance (LDE) ExtremeFFS™ greatly accelerates SSD random write speeds and endurance vRPM allows consumers to measure and compare SSD and hard disk drive performance Industry encouraged to adopt a simple endurance metric to determine the lifespan of an SSD LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, Nov. 5, 2008 —SanDisk® Corporation (NASDAQ: SNDK) today unveiled an advanced flash file system for solid-state drives (SSDs) that yields dramatic improvement in performance and reliability... Read more...
File-sharing, that's widely discussed.  But game sharing, not so much.  Basically the focus until now has been on music and movies, but now it seems industry has decided games being shared via P2P also deserve to be addressed. As many as 100 people suspected of illegally sharing computer game files over the internet are to be sued for copyright infringement, it emerged today. A London-based law firm said it would launch legal proceedings on behalf of the computer game publisher Topware Interactive after a woman was fined £16,000 for illegally sharing a pinball-themed game over the web. The woman, who has not been named, was forced to pay £6,000 of damages and £10,000... Read more...
The high-speed Internet advocacy Web site, Speed Matters, has just released a report on the average Internet connection speeds by U.S. state. If you live in Rhode Island (6,769 Kbps), Delaware (6,685 Kbps), New Jersey (5,825 Kbps), Virginia (5,033 Kbps), or Massachusetts (4,564 Kbps), you can take pride that your state has one of the fastest average Internet downstream connection speeds in the U.S. But before you get too smug, compare your speed against the average 63 Mbps downstream speed that the Communications Workers of America (CWA) claims Japan has... Or South Korea (49 Mbps), Finland (21 Mbps), France (17 Mbps), or even Canada (7.6 Mbps) for that matter. Credit: Speed MattersThe report... Read more...
Hewett Packard must have IBM envy. They've purchased Ross Perot's old technology services company, Electronic Data Systems,  for $13.2 billion, so they can claim to be the second place provider of such services to businesses and government, behind IBM.  As usual, the first rule of Takeover Club is: you're fired. It's a field dominated by IBM, which generated $54 billion in revenue from technology services last year. HP's technology services revenue will more than double to more than $38 billion with the addition of EDS, which had $22 billion in revenue last year.To make sure the EDS takeover pays off, HP indicated it will make significant layoffs as it eliminates overlapping jobs and... Read more...
The iPhone isn't cheap, and it's really not cheap when you factor in the two year ATT Wireless contract that is a non-negotiable  part of your purchase.  That could change. The US House of Representatives is holding a hearing today regarding legislation that would require carriers to allow you to bring your device to their plans without penalty. The bill would require wireless carriers to offer consumers the ability to purchase subsidy-free wireless equipment without a long-term service plan at a price no higher than comparable plans offered with subsidized equipment. The bill would also require carriers to prorate early termination fees to ensure that the carrier recovers the cost... Read more...
A recent update to Quicken Pro is having an adverse effect on some Macs.  By adverse effect, we mean that it's deleting non-Quicken related data on the desktop.  Yes, the desktop, the same place that users often put data they're currently working on.“The update caused several Mac users to lose data from their Desktop folders, infuriating many who were hoping to close their books this week for 2007, only to lose valuable purchase orders and spreadsheets. This problem doesn't appear to affect those using QuickBooks on Windows PCs, but it does appear to be causing problems for both Tiger and Leopard users. The update apparently came along with a prompt that read, "there is not enough space... Read more...
It's been rumored, and now it appears to be on the way: LED-backlit Macbooks from Apple.  What else could Apple do to we who might have purchased recently regret it?It was bound to happen--I just didn't expect it so soon. I plunked down for a MacBook on Black Friday and now, not a week after receiving it, rumors are circulating that new and improved models are on the way. DigiTimes reports today that two Taiwanese manufactures, Kenmos Technology and Taiwan Nano Electro-Optical Technology (Nano-Op), have signed on to supply Apple and Dell with LED-backlit displays. LCDs that use LED backlights instead of traditional fluorescent lamps are thinner and more energy efficient.Thinner, more energy-efficient? ... Read more...
A simple Internet word game has generated 1,072,025,720 grains of rice for the hungry since it first launched on October 7th, through November 9th. It's easy: each correct word is worth 10 grains of rice. What's the catch? There isn't a catch, for those of us playing, except perhaps some of your time --- and a few ads.An internet word game has generated enough rice to feed 50,000 people for one day, the UN's World Food Programme (WFP) has said.The game, FreeRice, tests the vocabulary of participants. For each click on a correct answer, the website donates money to buy 10 grains of rice.Companies advertising on the website provide the money to the WFP to buy and distribute the rice. Words get... Read more...
It's something that many have suspected.  Broadband speeds that in reality are much slower than advertised. Some 3,000 readers took part in speed tests and 62% found they routinely got less than half of the top speed advertised by their provider. It is the latest in a series of questions over the way net firms advertise broadband services. Regulator Ofcom said it was aware of the issue and was "investigating". The figures were gathered from more than 100,000 speed tests that the 3,000 respondents carried out to build up a picture of their average net-browsing speed on ADSL lines. It would be interesting to see a similar test... Read more...
It's coming, and it'll be here faster than you can think of it. The end of analog TV.  On February 17th, 2009, all analog TV broadcasts in the United States will cease.  Part of the transition process is a coupon program, whereby consumers will receive up to two $40 coupons for a digital converter box that will interface to their analog TV.  And the delivery of these coupons will be managed by IBM. The Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) said that IBM will manage the government's DTV coupon program, which will subsidize the analog-to-DTV handoff in 2009. IBM's contract will be worth an estimated $119,968,468 over 25 months, according... Read more...
Intel, ever pushing forward in its quest for CPU dominance, has released what it hopes will be considered a Core 2 CPU on the cheap, the Core 2 Duo E4400 and E4300. These CPUs are much like their big brothers except that they are based on the new Allendale core which has 2MB of L2 cahe, and a FSB of 800MHz instead of 1066MHz. Probably the best thing about the new E6420 and E6320 processors is the fact that the price is set to stay at exactly the same level as the current E6400 and E6300 processors, meaning that you'll be getting the benefits of an extra L2 cache for free. With this happening, it's leaves room for Intel to expand the bottom end of its line-up with more processors with... Read more...
You have to see this technology in action to believe it and get the full effect.  This demonstration is about as jaw-dropping as we've seen here for any technology in a very long time.  And the speed of the interface is amazing as well... "Jeff Han demonstrates his intuitive, "interface-free," touch-driven computer screen. Working all but alone from his hardware-strewn office, Jeff Han is about to change the face of computing. Not even the big boys are likely to catch him." Vista?  Who needs Vista?  Read the article on the man behind this amazing technology at: www.fastcompany.com... Read more...
We've been poking around at a new version of SiSoftware's SANDRA benchmark suite and came across some data that we think many of you will be interested in.  Recently we gave you a look at the fantastic performance of Intel's new Core 2 Extreme QX6700 quad-core processor.  In that launch article we couldn't confirm lower speed bins or model numbers of future quad-core CPUs from Intel but it seems the good folks at SiSoftware have...    As you can see, though unconfirmed in our launch article, it looks as though Intel will be bringing out a 2.4GHz Core 2 Quad Q6600 and a 2.13GHz Core 2 Quad Q6400.  We'd say opt for that Q6400 and overclock it of course.... Read more...
DigiTimes reports that NVIDIA is currently rushing to manufacture 80u variants of the company's G73-B1 and G72. Doing so will allow NVIDIA to better compete with rival ATI in the mainstream and entry-level GPU markets as the die-shrink will allow NVIDIA to run cooler, consume less power,  and allow for higher frequencies. ATI is already offering 80u products in these segments so NVIDIA is playing a game of catch-up in some respects. However, with NVIDIA supposedly releasing a new flagship GPU this month and ATI's answer not coming until Q1 2006 there is a bit of irony with the situation.  While ATI prepares to... Read more...
Anandtech has posted an interesting bit of news from IDF regarding the highly anticipated upcoming title Alan Wake and its apparent need for a dual-core CPU or better. Used as a demonstration to showcase the power of Intel's new quad-core CPU's, the exceptionally detailed game was actually running no less than five independent threads. Most surprising was the fact that using the Havoc physics engine, 80% of an entire core from the quad-core CPU in the test system was being dedicated strictly to physics. For all of the skeptics wondering why the industry was excited about quad-core processors, it appears as though Remedy and Intel have made a strong statement. Beyond Alan... Read more...
This week the BBC has written about what many have known for some time: the massive amount of graphical processing power Windows Vista will require. While it's not exactly as demanding as a game like Quake 4, Microsoft's new Aero Glass interface is like nothing Windows has seen before. "But the not so good news is that not everyone will have a PC that will be compatible. "A lot of people buy PCs that do not have a separate and discrete graphics card," explained Mr Makedon. "They have something called integrated graphics, which is basically built into their motherboard. "Typically today you may buy an Intel PC that has graphics built in. That's where the questionable part may be - it may... Read more...
HardOCP has just published an editorial which illustrates the need AGEIA's PhysX hardware has for a killer application. As we referenced in our PhysX launch coverage, we agree with Kyle's perspective that the game developers are the key to this new hardware. Although technology demos are fun to watch and toy around with, at the end of the day we need some great games to ever justify spending $250 or more on a discrete physics card.Forgetting all the important business components like install base, distribution, technical support, game publisher and developer partnerships.....the list goes on and on. Without a couple of killer apps soon that create their own buzz and solidify a PhysX community,... Read more...
XYZComputing has an interesting article for the Ubuntu community. They make their case for adding CNR to Ubuntu, which would give users an easier way to install this highly touted Linux OS.CNR is "a software delivery service designed for Linspire users that makes it easy to install Linux software". Rather than installing programs using the standard tools, like Synaptic or apt, Linspire users can search through the warehouse, choose a program, and then have one-click installation. CNR is a tiered system which offers a gold package. With this extras benefits and features are available including update notifications and discounts on commercial software. ... Read more...
The Inquirer reports this morning that NVIDIA's upcoming GeForce 7900 GTX is actually going to be a stellar overclocker thanks to its 90u process. This is in stark contrast to earlier reports from The Inquirer that the GPU was not able to reach desired core frequencies and that yields could be an issue. This just goes to show you that prior to an official launch, the vast majority of the information you read is anything but certain. This is roughly as much as you can overclock ATI X1900 XTX cards with an air cooler, but as you know those cards can reach a gigahertz if you cool them with dry ice or some other crazy technique. 700MHz or just a... Read more...
Mobile Gaming At Desktop Speeds Tests & Benchmarks With The Pentium 4M & NVIDIA's GeForce4 440 Go By Dave Altavilla 6/3/02   There was once a time when the average Laptop Computer, even the top of the line models, were designed and built strictly for business.  There were little if any true multimedia capabilities, without the need for DVD Drives, elaborate sound systems, CD-RW drives or 3D Graphics.  You got your basic CPU, Drive, RAM and LCD screen with floppy, keyboard and mouse.  The bells and whistles just weren't available and gaming on these machines was not even considered.  However, as the average end user became more PC savvy and technology made it possible... Read more...