Items tagged with China

This past June, on a day when Apple had a number of big announcements - such as OS X 'El Capitan', the much-expected launch of Apple Music, and the announcement of WatchOS 2 - the company also revealed a new app for the iPhone and iPad that it hopes will redefine how people read their news. The aptly named News app lets people catch up on their news by browsing through automatically curated stories presented in a magazine format. Overall, a simple, but neat app. But despite its simplicity, this is one app that Apple has to be careful with. Because of its ability to automatically pull in stories that might interest you, certain governments might have an issue with it. China being a great example,... Read more...
Microsoft really wants you to use Bing. The company makes Bing a focal point of its new Windows 10 and Windows 10 Mobile operating system and even pays customers to use its search engine with Bing Rewards. The company has even received some flak for making Bing the default search engine in Windows 10 if they choose the Express upgrade options, since this overrode the user’s previous default search option. Bing has roughly 20 percent of the U.S. search engine market, and a little less than 11 percent of the global search engine market. In an effort to push Windows 10 growth in China, Microsoft’s isn’t going to try to force Bing upon users. Instead, it has teamed up with Chinese giant Baidu, making... Read more...
Michael Dell is no longer beholden to shareholders after taking the computer company he founded private two years ago. As such, he's free to invest more than $125 billion in China over the next five years as part of his "In China, For China" 4.0 strategy announced today without having to worry about how it might affect the company's stock price. The massive investment will continue to expand and enhance Dell's research and development team in China, Dell's second largest market for PC sales. It will also contribute some $175 million to imports and exports, which in turn will sustain more than 1 million jobs in the country. "China and the United States are among the countries where the information... Read more...
At least one market research firm believes that China, the biggest country for smartphone sales, has reached saturation. As a result, worldwide smartphone sales grew 13.5 percent year-over-year, the slowest growth rate since 2013, with units totaling 330 million in the second quarter of 2015, according to Gartner. That's despite new smartphone launches from both Apple and Samsung. China accounted for nearly a third -- 30 percent -- of all smartphone sales in the second quarter. However, the market in China is largely driven by replacement handsets rather than first-time buyers, Gartner says. With China reaching saturation, smartphone sales in the region fell 4 percent year-over-year, marking... Read more...
It looks as though the U.S. Government just can’t catch a break when it comes to cybersecurity issues. If it isn’t China that’s breaching the Office of Personal Management (OPM), accessing the personnel files of 21.5 million people, then the U.S. has to keep an eye for hackers originating from Russia. The latter is pegged as the source for the recent cyberattack on the Pentagon’s Joint Staff email system. If there’s any silver lining to today’s news, it’s that the email system contained “unclassified” information. The cyberattack, which occurred on July 25, affected around 4,000 military personnel that work for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs. The email system has been offline since the breach... Read more...
China is finally ending a ban on gaming consoles that has proven to be a real hindrance to companies like Nintendo, Microsoft, and Sony. But before you ask, “I thought China already lifted the ban?” you have to realize that Chinese regulatory agencies only allowed consoles to be sold within the country if they were manufactured within the Shanghai Free Trade Zone. Now that Chinese officials have had a change of heart, manufacturers (both foreign and domestic) are free to build and sell their consoles anywhere within the country. Needless to say, console manufacturers are elated at the possibility of tapping into the Chinese gaming market without being stymied by miles of bureaucratic red tape.... Read more...
Tsinghua Unigroup Ltd., a Chinese state-owned semiconductor design firm, is reportedly making a play to acquire Micron Technology Inc. for $23 billion. Should the transaction ultimately happen, there would be no more U.S. memory makers left standing. However, there are several hurdles that stand in the way of the transaction, including the purchase price. Citing people familiar with the matter, The Wall Street Journal says Tsinghua Unigroup is trying to acquire Micron for $21 per share. That represents a more than 19 percent premium over Micron's stock price at the time the story broke, and though that seems attractive at a glance, it's also around 21 percent below Micron's 100-day moving average... Read more...
Maybe someday the Chinese government will take a page from O.J. Simpson and write a book titled, "If I Did It: Confessions of a Hacker." After all, China is clinging to the innocence card just as adamantly as Simpson, never mind any evidence to the contrary. In fact, not only is the Chinese government saying it's not responsible for a massive security breach that compromised the personal information of millions of U.S. federal employees, but it claims that the accusations are the result of "absurd logic."The security breach was discovered in April, but actually began back in December of last year. Having gone unnoticed for four months, the hackers responsible were able to sift through personal... Read more...
An anonymous bidder laid out a cool $91K and change in an online auction to put an extra-special Iron Man Limited Edition Galaxy S6 Edge in their pocket, agreeing to pay 100 times the retail price for the device due to its 66 serial number (in China six is considered a lucky number, and thus 66 is doubly so). Yes, you read that right, and no, it is not the 1st of April, not in the U.S., China, or anywhere else today on our spinning blue rock.  The JD.com auction for the devilishly cool Iron Man Limited Edition Galaxy S666 Edge comes just two weeks after another one of the Edge-y Tony Stark devices sold on eBay for the comparatively low price of $35,600. Specifically,... Read more...
We've heard of benchmarking scandals before, but usually they involve gaming benchmarks and tweaked drivers that run afoul of the rules to gain a competitive advantage. This time, however, it's Chinese search engine Baidu that's in hot water after it was discovered that its supercomputer cheated in a major artificial intelligence competition.Prior to being caught, Dr. Ren Wu, head of the Baidu Heterogeneous Computing team, had boasted that his company was the top dog in computer intelligence. "We have great power in our hands -- much greater than our competitors," Dr. Wu said. The competitors he speaks of include both Google and Microsoft, a couple of tech titans based in the U.S.Baidu's bad... Read more...
Netflix is a streaming giant, offering its services in all of North America, South America, parts of Europe (including the UK, Ireland, Germany, and France), and Australia, among other countries (a Japanese launch is coming this fall). Netflix has over 40 million customers in the United States, and 60 million total globally. During Q1 2015 (PDF), its subscribers streamed more than 10 billion hours of programming. As growth in the U.S. market has slowed, Netflix is increasingly turning its attention towards expanding into more global markets. And what better way to significantly boost its international presence than to take the Chinese market by storm? The Wall Street Journal is reporting that... Read more...
There's evidence to suggest that China's smartphone market is headed towards saturation. According to the number crunchers at International Data Corporation, smartphone sales in China dipped 4 percent year-on-year with 98.8 million units shipped in the first quarter of 2015. This is the first time in six years that China's seen the smartphone market contract on an annual basis. Compared to the previous quarter, smartphone sales are down 8 percent in China as inventory was built up at the end of last year. What these numbers suggest is that most people in China who want a smartphone already own one, leaving phone makers to compete for customers looking to upgrade their handsets.The two companies... Read more...
Coming off a record performance for fiscal Q1, Apple once again knocked it out of the park with its fiscal Q1 numbers. Revenue for the quarter came in $58 billion, while net profit was a hefty $13.6 billion. This compares to revenue of $45.6 billion and net profit of $10.2 billion for the same period one year ago. Gross margin for the quarter came in at 40.8 percent and international sales accounted for 69 percent of Apple’s revenue for the quarter. Not surprisingly, and as we alluded to earlier this morning, China was hugely important to Apple’s bottom line during fiscal Q2. Revenue from China increased a whopping 71 percent year-over-year. When it comes to hardware, Apple sold 61.17 million... Read more...
Analysts expect that China will become a bigger market for Apple's iPhone than the United States, and to underscore the point, it's believed that quarterly iPhone sales in the region exceeded the U.S. for the first time. This can be explained, in part, by China's New Year celebrations, a time when people get in the gift giving mood. Citing market research firm Creative Strategies LLC, Bloomberg reports that last quarter's iPhone sales in greater China are likely to be between 18 million and 20 million, compared to 14 million to 15 million in the U.S. Not too shabby, though the question is whether or not China will continue to be a bigger market than the U.S. for iPhone sales going forward. "Before,... Read more...
It’s no secret that U.S. tech companies have been worried by China’s digital security policies, which make it difficult for foreign tech firms to operate in the country. But it’s unusual to see a Chinese company voice any concern. That makes recent comments by Huawei CEO Eric Xu all the more interesting.“If we’re not open, if we don’t bring in the world’s best technology, we’ll never have true information security,” Xu told Reuters. “The only way you can answer the security problem is to keep improving your technology,” he added. Huawei at CES 2015."If the Chinese market is not open, then the European market won't be open, other markets won't be open, then what's the result? The result is everyone... Read more...
We reported a couple of weeks ago that GitHub was hit with a massive DDoS attack, and given the projects that were targeted; it was widely assumed that China was behind the attack. Now, there's even more evidence of that, and it appears that a brand-new weapon was used to carry the attack out. According to a report from Citizenlab, China's attack against GitHub used a tool called 'Great Cannon' which acts as a man-in-the-middle attack to redirect traffic. It's been said that this attack involved "millions" of redirected HTTP requests, and according to TechCrunch, it pushed GitHub's Amazon EC2 bill to $30,000 per day.  GitHub is reported to have been attacked by Great Cannon last month Up... Read more...
The cyberwar and war of words between the United States and China is never-ending. When we last visited the tense relationship between the U.S. and China, President Barack Obama was crying foul over draft anti-terrorism legislation that would negatively affect American companies conducting business in China. More to the point, Obama took direct issue with language in the bill that would require American companies operating within China to deliver encryption keys to the Chinese government, install security backdoors, and keep all user data on Chinese soil. "Those kinds of restrictive practices I think would ironically hurt the Chinese economy over the long term,” said Obama in a March interview... Read more...
The HTC One family just grew by, well, one with the addition of the One M9+ (or One M9 Plus, if you prefer), a fancy-pants phone with a spacious 5.2-inch Quad HD display (2560x1440) and all-metal design. Essentially a larger doppelganger of the of the original One M9 and only HTC's second Quad HD device (the other being the One E9+ released a week ago), the M9+ is curiously only available in China.Why only China? According to HTC, it's because the One M9+ is the result of "working closely with mobile operators" in the region to offer a specific set of specifications and radio network compatibility. HTC said it will confirm additional markets locally at a later date, though if you live North America... Read more...
Many analysts wondered aloud if Apple was pricing itself out of the Chinese smartphone market with premium devices like the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. Well, according to data from market research firm Kantar Worldpanel, those fears were unwarranted. Apple’s iPhone family was able to grab a record 27.6 percent of the smartphone market in China during a three-month period ending in February, making Apple the number one smartphone OEM. The 4.7-inch iPhone 6 led the way with a 10.2 percent share of the market, which was enough to make it the best selling smartphone in China. Second place when to the Xiaomi RedMi Note, while the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus took third place. "There has been a strong appetite... Read more...
For all the excitement and fanfare Tesla Motors enjoyed when it entered the Chinese market more than a year ago, the electric car manufacturer is fighting weak sales now. CEO Elon Musk has returned to China to help the company improve its image there and get sales back on track. At least part of the problem for Tesla in China has been a fear that customers have had in the United States: range anxiety, which is the worry that your car will run out of battery power before you can find an appropriate charger. While Tesla proved to Americans that they could easily charge their Tesla vehicles, that’s proven to be a tougher sell in China. Part of the problem may have been the sales people themselves.... Read more...
WeChat users in China will have to keep stories of one-night stands to themselves. That's because China's Internet regulator, Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC), has posted new guidelines that prohibit sexual and otherwise vulgar content the popular messaging application owned by Tencent Holdings. Also out are stories of "wife-swapping, sexual abuse, and other harmful information." The same goes for explicit pictures and text, such as nude photos and erotic anime, all of which are now banned on WeChat. Users who ignore the ban will be subject to a one-week suspension the first time they're caught. After four slaps on the wrist, accounts that continue to run afoul of the rules will be banned... Read more...
Flying high on the success of its iPhone trade-in program in the U.S., Apple is reportedly going to introduce a similar incentive in the China with the help of Foxconn. Beginning March 31, owners of older iPhone models will be able to trade their devices in at Apple Store locations in China and receive credit for the company's products.Apple isn't getting into the used phone business, though Foxconn is more than happy to purchase the traded-in models and flip them back to consumers who might not be interested in or able to afford a shiny new flagship model.As they're accustomed to doing, Apple and Foxconn will work closely on the program (Foxconn is Apple's main supplier of iPhones and other... Read more...
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