Items tagged with China

Maybe someday the Chinese government will take a page from O.J. Simpson and write a book titled, "If I Did It: Confessions of a Hacker." After all, China is clinging to the innocence card just as adamantly as Simpson, never mind any evidence to the contrary. In fact, not only is the Chinese government saying it's not responsible for a massive security breach that compromised the personal information of millions of U.S. federal employees, but it claims that the accusations are the result of "absurd logic."The security breach was discovered in April, but actually began back in December of last year. Having gone unnoticed for four months, the hackers responsible were able to sift through personal... Read more...
An anonymous bidder laid out a cool $91K and change in an online auction to put an extra-special Iron Man Limited Edition Galaxy S6 Edge in their pocket, agreeing to pay 100 times the retail price for the device due to its 66 serial number (in China six is considered a lucky number, and thus 66 is doubly so). Yes, you read that right, and no, it is not the 1st of April, not in the U.S., China, or anywhere else today on our spinning blue rock.  The JD.com auction for the devilishly cool Iron Man Limited Edition Galaxy S666 Edge comes just two weeks after another one of the Edge-y Tony Stark devices sold on eBay for the comparatively low price of $35,600. Specifically,... Read more...
We've heard of benchmarking scandals before, but usually they involve gaming benchmarks and tweaked drivers that run afoul of the rules to gain a competitive advantage. This time, however, it's Chinese search engine Baidu that's in hot water after it was discovered that its supercomputer cheated in a major artificial intelligence competition.Prior to being caught, Dr. Ren Wu, head of the Baidu Heterogeneous Computing team, had boasted that his company was the top dog in computer intelligence. "We have great power in our hands -- much greater than our competitors," Dr. Wu said. The competitors he speaks of include both Google and Microsoft, a couple of tech titans based in the U.S.Baidu's bad... Read more...
Netflix is a streaming giant, offering its services in all of North America, South America, parts of Europe (including the UK, Ireland, Germany, and France), and Australia, among other countries (a Japanese launch is coming this fall). Netflix has over 40 million customers in the United States, and 60 million total globally. During Q1 2015 (PDF), its subscribers streamed more than 10 billion hours of programming. As growth in the U.S. market has slowed, Netflix is increasingly turning its attention towards expanding into more global markets. And what better way to significantly boost its international presence than to take the Chinese market by storm? The Wall Street Journal is reporting that... Read more...
There's evidence to suggest that China's smartphone market is headed towards saturation. According to the number crunchers at International Data Corporation, smartphone sales in China dipped 4 percent year-on-year with 98.8 million units shipped in the first quarter of 2015. This is the first time in six years that China's seen the smartphone market contract on an annual basis. Compared to the previous quarter, smartphone sales are down 8 percent in China as inventory was built up at the end of last year. What these numbers suggest is that most people in China who want a smartphone already own one, leaving phone makers to compete for customers looking to upgrade their handsets.The two companies... Read more...
Coming off a record performance for fiscal Q1, Apple once again knocked it out of the park with its fiscal Q1 numbers. Revenue for the quarter came in $58 billion, while net profit was a hefty $13.6 billion. This compares to revenue of $45.6 billion and net profit of $10.2 billion for the same period one year ago. Gross margin for the quarter came in at 40.8 percent and international sales accounted for 69 percent of Apple’s revenue for the quarter. Not surprisingly, and as we alluded to earlier this morning, China was hugely important to Apple’s bottom line during fiscal Q2. Revenue from China increased a whopping 71 percent year-over-year. When it comes to hardware, Apple sold 61.17 million... Read more...
Analysts expect that China will become a bigger market for Apple's iPhone than the United States, and to underscore the point, it's believed that quarterly iPhone sales in the region exceeded the U.S. for the first time. This can be explained, in part, by China's New Year celebrations, a time when people get in the gift giving mood. Citing market research firm Creative Strategies LLC, Bloomberg reports that last quarter's iPhone sales in greater China are likely to be between 18 million and 20 million, compared to 14 million to 15 million in the U.S. Not too shabby, though the question is whether or not China will continue to be a bigger market than the U.S. for iPhone sales going forward. "Before,... Read more...
It’s no secret that U.S. tech companies have been worried by China’s digital security policies, which make it difficult for foreign tech firms to operate in the country. But it’s unusual to see a Chinese company voice any concern. That makes recent comments by Huawei CEO Eric Xu all the more interesting.“If we’re not open, if we don’t bring in the world’s best technology, we’ll never have true information security,” Xu told Reuters. “The only way you can answer the security problem is to keep improving your technology,” he added. Huawei at CES 2015."If the Chinese market is not open, then the European market won't be open, other markets won't be open, then what's the result? The result is everyone... Read more...
We reported a couple of weeks ago that GitHub was hit with a massive DDoS attack, and given the projects that were targeted; it was widely assumed that China was behind the attack. Now, there's even more evidence of that, and it appears that a brand-new weapon was used to carry the attack out. According to a report from Citizenlab, China's attack against GitHub used a tool called 'Great Cannon' which acts as a man-in-the-middle attack to redirect traffic. It's been said that this attack involved "millions" of redirected HTTP requests, and according to TechCrunch, it pushed GitHub's Amazon EC2 bill to $30,000 per day.  GitHub is reported to have been attacked by Great Cannon last month Up... Read more...
The cyberwar and war of words between the United States and China is never-ending. When we last visited the tense relationship between the U.S. and China, President Barack Obama was crying foul over draft anti-terrorism legislation that would negatively affect American companies conducting business in China. More to the point, Obama took direct issue with language in the bill that would require American companies operating within China to deliver encryption keys to the Chinese government, install security backdoors, and keep all user data on Chinese soil. "Those kinds of restrictive practices I think would ironically hurt the Chinese economy over the long term,” said Obama in a March interview... Read more...
The HTC One family just grew by, well, one with the addition of the One M9+ (or One M9 Plus, if you prefer), a fancy-pants phone with a spacious 5.2-inch Quad HD display (2560x1440) and all-metal design. Essentially a larger doppelganger of the of the original One M9 and only HTC's second Quad HD device (the other being the One E9+ released a week ago), the M9+ is curiously only available in China.Why only China? According to HTC, it's because the One M9+ is the result of "working closely with mobile operators" in the region to offer a specific set of specifications and radio network compatibility. HTC said it will confirm additional markets locally at a later date, though if you live North America... Read more...
Many analysts wondered aloud if Apple was pricing itself out of the Chinese smartphone market with premium devices like the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. Well, according to data from market research firm Kantar Worldpanel, those fears were unwarranted. Apple’s iPhone family was able to grab a record 27.6 percent of the smartphone market in China during a three-month period ending in February, making Apple the number one smartphone OEM. The 4.7-inch iPhone 6 led the way with a 10.2 percent share of the market, which was enough to make it the best selling smartphone in China. Second place when to the Xiaomi RedMi Note, while the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus took third place. "There has been a strong appetite... Read more...
For all the excitement and fanfare Tesla Motors enjoyed when it entered the Chinese market more than a year ago, the electric car manufacturer is fighting weak sales now. CEO Elon Musk has returned to China to help the company improve its image there and get sales back on track. At least part of the problem for Tesla in China has been a fear that customers have had in the United States: range anxiety, which is the worry that your car will run out of battery power before you can find an appropriate charger. While Tesla proved to Americans that they could easily charge their Tesla vehicles, that’s proven to be a tougher sell in China. Part of the problem may have been the sales people themselves.... Read more...
WeChat users in China will have to keep stories of one-night stands to themselves. That's because China's Internet regulator, Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC), has posted new guidelines that prohibit sexual and otherwise vulgar content the popular messaging application owned by Tencent Holdings. Also out are stories of "wife-swapping, sexual abuse, and other harmful information." The same goes for explicit pictures and text, such as nude photos and erotic anime, all of which are now banned on WeChat. Users who ignore the ban will be subject to a one-week suspension the first time they're caught. After four slaps on the wrist, accounts that continue to run afoul of the rules will be banned... Read more...
Flying high on the success of its iPhone trade-in program in the U.S., Apple is reportedly going to introduce a similar incentive in the China with the help of Foxconn. Beginning March 31, owners of older iPhone models will be able to trade their devices in at Apple Store locations in China and receive credit for the company's products.Apple isn't getting into the used phone business, though Foxconn is more than happy to purchase the traded-in models and flip them back to consumers who might not be interested in or able to afford a shiny new flagship model.As they're accustomed to doing, Apple and Foxconn will work closely on the program (Foxconn is Apple's main supplier of iPhones and other... Read more...
Hot on the heels of its announcement that a Chinese tech company will be making Power8-style processors, IBM is taking further steps to publicly ally with China. IBM’s CEO and Chairperson Virginia Rometty attended the China Development Forum this week, where she discussed IBM’s stance on doing business with Chinese tech companies. “If you’re a country, as China is, of 1.3 billion people you would want an IT industry as well, Rometty said, according to Reuters. She went on to say that, where other companies might be frightened by the prospect, IBM considers it a “great opportunity.” (Image credit: IBM)China’s government is pushing to improve the capabilities of domestic tech companies, while pressuring... Read more...
Chinese gamers that have been anticipating the arrival of Sony’s PlayStation 4 console will only have to wait just a little bit longer. Sony officially announced today that the PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita will be available on Friday, March 20. Sony had originally settled on a January 11 launch date for its consoles, but was stymied by Chinese government. "The government asked us for final adjustments, which will take some time, so we decided to delay the launch date," said Sony spokeswoman Kaede Bun in early January. With things now firmly back on track, Chinese customers can expect to pay 2,899 yuan ($463) for the PlayStation 4 and 1,299 yuan ($207) for the PlayStation Vita. In addition... Read more...
U.S. President Barack Obama is getting a little hot under the collar, and we’re not talking about the speech that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gave this morning. Instead, President Obama is troubled over new regulations that are being proposed by the Chinese government, which would affect American tech companies that conduct business within China’s borders. President Obama is fearful that China’s plans — which include allowing the Chinese government to install security backdoors, requiring companies to hand over encryption keys, and keeping user data on Chinese soil — are an assault on intellectual property held by American companies and leaves customers open to privacy violations.... Read more...
Will your next mobile device come from Huawei? Don't rule it out, even if you've never heard of the company. Huawei makes some downright sexy looking mobile devices, though its presence in the United States is limited, in part because of a House Intelligence Committee report in 2012 ago saying that Chinese telecom firms Huawei and ZTE pose security threats to the U.S.Over two years removed from the report, Huawei plans to focus on the U.S. market and win over consumers by launching several new smartphones and wearable products stateside, which it will promote with a marketing push, according to Reuters. The company didn't say how much it plans to spend on marketing its devices, though it will... Read more...
China has banned several prominent technology brands from its approved purchase list, presumably because it fears that foreign companies are helping the U.S. government with its spying efforts. There are several well-known names on the list, including Apple, Intel, and Cisco, the latter of which is perhaps being hit the hardest by the ban. According to Reuters, Cisco had no less than 60 products on the Central Government Procurement Center's (CGPC) list in 2012, but they've all disappeared by the end of 2014. It's assumed that the ban on these and other products is in reaction to the disclosures of former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden on the U.S. government's widespread... Read more...
Samsung's attempt to turn things around and boost its smartphone sales isn't getting much help from the Chinese market. Instead, Samsung has slipped to fifth place among China's top smartphone players, taking up the last spot before the catchall "Others" category, according to latest data compiled by International Data Corporation. The fall to fifth place was the result of "immense competition," particularly from Xiaomi and the other Chinese vendors in the low to mid-range segment of the market, IDC said. As a result, Samsung shipped 49.9 percent fewer smartphones in the fourth quarter of 2014 in China compared to the same quarter a year ago, leaving the South... Read more...
Qualcomm managed to negotiate its way out of paying the full amount of what could have been a $1.6 billion fine in China over antitrust violations. Instead, China's National Development and Reform Commission imposed a record fine of $975 million, a figure Qualcomm agreed not to contest even though it's "disappointed" with how the investigation turned out. At the same time, Qualcomm said it's happy to have it done and over with. As part of the settlement, Qualcomm agreed to a number of terms and conditions mostly related to how it licenses technologies to companies in China. For example, Qualcomm said it will offer licenses to its current 3G and 4G essential Chinese patents separately from licenses... Read more...
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