Items tagged with bus

If you live in San Francisco and routinely end up in the bus lane, be aware that a new law might foil your time-saving plans:“Not long after hearing about England's newfangled auto-ticketing system comes word that San Franciscans could soon be facing something similar. If signed into law by Governor Schwarzenegger, "forward-facing digital video cameras would be installed on city buses," which would then be used to automatically ticket the owners of vehicles that are caught "blocking buses." The cameras would presumably be used to photograph vehicles that are in bus-only lanes, and interestingly enough, the proposed law also authorizes Municipal Transportation Agency "employees to access sensitive... Read more...
Time Inc. has pulled the plug on their Business 2.0 monthly magazine.  Like most things with 2.0 appended to the end of its name, nobody knew or cared why it wasn't just 1.0. Now it's 0.0. Interestingly, Time did not sell the magazine, even though they had offers. Wishing your beloved was dead rather than in the arms of a lover seems very...unbusinesslike 2.0. Time will reassign the editor of Business 2.0, Josh Quittner, and nine other editorial staff members to Fortune magazine, the report said. Time, a unit of Time Warner Inc, turned down offers from Mansueto Ventures, owners of rival magazine Fast Company, and other possible buyers, the report said,... Read more...
The European Commission is joining various US courts in examining the legal rights and wrongs of Rambus.  Apparently the EC is taking issue with Rambus allegedly not properly disclosing all of its patents to potential customers who were interested in acquiring licenses for other Rambus technology.By not telling customers that Rambus held patents in relevant technology that was essentially required to properly utilize technology they licensed to others, Rambus was setting themselves up for a future law suit against their own clients and licensees.Whether or not there were outstanding reasons for this practice is not, at this time, clear. “Rambus has nine weeks to reply to the charges, after... Read more...
Subprime mortgage market? Stock market? What are you talking about? I was referring to BusinessWeek's report that municipal wireless networks are colossal money losers, and the companies that partnered with many cities and counties to offer it are tired of losing their shirt on expensive infrastructure and operating costs based on demand that never materialized. And so the taxpayers are being lined up to bear the cost of municipal Wi-Fi, whether they want it or not. For now, a tiny user base can't even begin to cover an operator's costs. Take Lompoc, Calif., population 42,000. The city deployed its 11.3-square-mile Wi-Fi network last September, at a cost of more than $2 million so far.... Read more...
Another victory for people scared of the outside world (we hear it's dangerous out there) came today when Blockbuster bought Movielink for an undisclosed sum that is rumored to be $50 million. “Blockbuster said Wednesday it is buying the digital movie-download service Movielink, giving it a stronger online foothold to compete with its rival. The Dallas-based video rental chain said it would continue to operate Movielink as a stand-alone service but eventually make elements of it available through Blockbuster’s online-ordering, mail-delivery service.” Whether or not this acquisition will allow Blockbuster to catch up to Netflix in the online delivery market is open to debate.... Read more...
Online video rental service Netflix noticed that their big rival for your rental dollar, Blockbuster, was wooing away their customers with lower prices. So Netflix is lowering the cost of two of their most popular subscription plans to match Blockbuster's prices. With the reductions announced Sunday, Netflix will charge $16.99 per month for subscribers who keep up to three DVDs at a time with no limit on how frequently the discs are mailed back in return for another movie. The price to keep one DVD at a time will fall to $8.99 per month. The price cuts, which take effect Tuesday, match Blockbuster's fees for similar online services. Earlier this year, Netflix... Read more...
AMD got a little buzz last week when they talked about the bigtime capabilities of their next-generation  processors, code-named Barcelona, due out later this year. As usual, Intel doesn't hesitate to ramp up the pressure on their competitor, and is planning huge price cuts on their  existing versions of  quad-core  processors for desktops and servers. According to DailyTech, the price cuts will kick in on July 22nd. The first part of the price cuts will center on Intel's quad-core desktop processors. The Q6600, which Intel launched in February, currently sells for $530 in quantities of 1000. When the product was originally launched, it was priced at $851 in quantities of 1000. The... Read more...
Every so often someone predicts a breakthrough in "electronic paper," which could supplant backlit screens for reading text and looking at pictures. Power consumption would be greatly reduced and readability improved. A prototype for a full color version of E Ink's electronic paper being readied for next year might be the tipping point. If it can achieve that, McQuivey said, E Ink could threaten to displace the cheap and ubiquitous liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), while revolutionizing how we think about reading. Electronic billboards, for example, would no longer need to be bulky or costly to erect. They could be hung from just about any wall or folded into the back of a car for... Read more...
You've already read five hundred articles announcing the death of the music CD business. You'll probably read five hundred more. Slate examines the music obituary page, and determines it's just the people that want to sell you an overpriced disc filled with music you don't want from a store with huge overheads that are holding the lilies. There's plenty of money for people with an up-to-date approach to retail. Legacy music retailers and manufacturers now face many of the same difficulties as American auto companies. They built a business infrastructure - national chains, huge outlets in high-profile locations, layers of management - predicated on selling massive and... Read more...
Fascinating whitepaper report (pdf) over at Stanford University on a proposal to rebuild the internet from scratch. The ad hoc elements that make the internet a marvelous wild west of information are rubbing up against the limits of the infrastructure. Can we do better if we start over? Will the big players let you, even if you do come up with a better idea? We believe that the current Internet has significant deficiencies that need to be solved before it can become a unified global communication infrastructure. Further, we believe the Internet.s shortcomings will not be resolved by the conventional incremental and .backward-compatible.... Read more...
It's easy to get caught up in announcements of breakthroughs in chip technology. But the only announcement that's of any use, really, is that they're being manufactured somewhere. Samsung announced today that 60-nanometer DRAM chips are coming off their line -- right now. The new process can increase production efficiency by 40 percent over the 80-nanometer technology which has been deployed in dynamic random access memory (DRAM) chip manufacturing since last year, the world's largest memory chipmaker said. The firm anticipates that improved productivity will cut costs and help 60-nano 1 gigabit DRAM chips become a mainstream item in 2008. Smaller faster cheaper, please.... Read more...
Sorry to bother you, but the Internet is busted. And we're not talking "global-warming-forty -years-from-now-we're-going-to-be-really-hot busted." We appear to be talking "this-year" busted. A new assessment from Deloitte & Touche predicts that global traffic will exceed the Internet's capacity as soon as this year. Why? The rapid growth in the number of global Internet users, combined with the rise of online video services and the lack of investment in new infrastructure. If Deloitte's predictions are accurate, the traffic on many Internet backbones could slow to a crawl this year absent substantial new infrastructure investments and deployment. Net Neutrality means... Read more...
What would a World Economic Forum in Switzerland be without a discussion of Google paying video uploaders for videos of people doing interesting, humorous, or Darwin-tempting things? Smoke belching factories are so twentieth century. ... analyst Josh Bernoff suspects that YouTube could launch a channel filled with advertiser-friendly videos that have been screened by both audio-fingerprinting technology and Google employees for objectionable or copyrighted content. Advertising revenue could then be shared between Google and the producers whose videos generate significant attention on the channel. "This might be filled with content that is safe... Read more...
Multicore chips are a kind of cheating as far as Moore's Law goes. You're bringing a gang to the fight for faster processors. The battle to store the information those chips handle is where a lot of the action is now. Wired took a tour at Seagate's R and D labs, and they're talking about terabits per inch now: Their current solution to this problem is recording data perpendicular to the plane of the media. This technology, however, is expected to peak out at about 1 terabit per square inch. In the next decade, Seagate plans to hit the market with twin technologies that could fly far beyond, ultimately offering as much as 50 terabits per square inch. On a standard 3.5-inch drive,... Read more...
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