Items tagged with X79

Gigabyte is obviously feeling bullish about the future of desktop PCs if the energy and resources that the company is putting into its upcoming line of motherboards is any indication. Earlier this week, Gigabyte previewed its boards for a few journalists and discussed a new million-dollar-plus lab that it built for the sole purpose of providing week-long burn-ins for its high-end Black Edition motherboards. Although we can’t give you details about supported CPUs and whatnot until further announcements are made, we’re able to share a few up-close and personal photos we shot of the boards. First up is the Gigabyte G1 line, which is targeted at the gaming community. The new G1 branding... Read more...
It has been a while since I have personally setup a test bench, rolled up my sleeves and built a test system with top-shelf components, a fresh OS install and some overclocking mojo. However, Intel's recent release of Ivy Bridge-E gave us a hankering to do just that. We've been testing a lot of tablets, smartphones and ultrabooks, but there's a certain satisfaction that comes with building a high performance system from the ground up, that you just don't get from pre-built devices. So I decided to see if I still had the chops. EVGA recently took the wraps off a new high-end X79 motherboard dubbed the X79 Dark and its black PCB with red accents, as it turned out, matched quite nicely... Read more...
This most recent metamorphosis of the PC hasn’t been kind to the high-end desktop processor segment. While the industry as a whole continues to focus on the steadily growing ultra-mobile market, and releases new products in rapid succession, there have only been two major flagship desktop processors released since the Intel Core i7-3960X hit the scene in late 2011—the slightly faster Intel Core i7-3970X and AMD’s limited edition FX-9590. And even then, AMD’s chip is most likely going to compete with Intel’s more mainstream quad-core parts. We’ll know exactly how it performs soon enough, when we complete our full evaluation of the FX-9590. Low-power parts... Read more...
This most recent metamorphosis of the PC hasn’t been kind to the high-end desktop processor segment. While the industry as a whole continues to focus on the steadily growing ultra-mobile market, and releases new products in rapid succession, there have only been two major flagship desktop processors released since the Intel Core i7-3960X hit the scene in late 2011—the slightly faster Intel Core i7-3970X and AMD’s limited edition FX-9590. And even then, AMD’s chip is most likely going to compete with Intel’s more mainstream quad-core parts; we’ll know exactly how it performs soon enough, when we complete our full evaluation of the FX-9590. Low-power parts that... Read more...
The answer to the question of which CPU/motherboard combo from Intel delivers the most extreme desktop performance is the Intel Extreme Edition Core i7-3970X (3.5GHz, 4GHz Turbo) CPU and the Extreme Series Intel Desktop Board DX79SR (Stormville), which are now available. The 6-core Ivy Bridge beast of a processor offers up 15MB cache, 4 channels of DDR3 memory, integrated graphics, and of course it supports Hyper-Threading. The chip costs $1,059 in the box. As for the DX79SR motherboard, it features 8 DIMM slots and support for up to 64GB of system memory (DDR3-2400+ OC) as well as three PCIe 3.0 x 16 slots, two PCIe x1 slots, one PCI slot, up to six USB 3.0 and fourteen USB 2.0 ports, two FireWire... Read more...
One of the things we like about AVADirect is the extensive catalog of off-the-shelf parts to choose from. In fact, a major advantage of shopping from a boutique system builder as opposed to a bulk OEM is the availability of name brand hardware you'd otherwise buy from Newegg, or wherever it is you purchase your components, when rolling your own rig. But what's somewhat unique to AVADirect is the smorgasbord of brands and models to choose from. The robust selection of hardware makes evaluating an AVADirect system somewhat of a challenge in terms of focus, but it's a good problem to have. In our case, AVADirect pieced together a high-end system from its 'Gaming PC' category, built around Intel's... Read more...
One of the things we like about AVADirect is the extensive catalog of off-the-shelf parts to choose from. In fact, a major advantage of shopping from a boutique system builder as opposed to a bulk OEM is the availability of name brand hardware you'd otherwise buy from Newegg, or wherever it is you purchase your components, when rolling your own rig. But what's somewhat unique to AVADirect is the smorgasbord of brands and models to choose from. It's like being a kid-geek in a candy store. Just browsing AVADirect's selection of tower cases, for example, you'll find that nearly two dozen manufacturers are represented, each one offering several models. Antec alone accounts for 27 tower cases on AVADirect's... Read more...
To coincide with the release of Intel's current flagship Sandy Bridge-E processor and companion X79 chipset, a number of Intel’s memory partners released new quad-channel memory kits optimized for the platform. Previous Intel platforms were designed to offer optimal performance with two or three-channel memory configurations; Sandy Bridge-E and the X79 Express, however, perform best with a quad-channel setup. As such, we thought it would be a good idea to round-up a varied group of quad-channel memory kit options to see how each performed with a Sandy Bridge-E CPU and the X79 Express chipset, along with learning about what kind of features they offered to end users... Quad-Channel DDR3... Read more...
To coincide with the release of Intel's current flagship Sandy Bridge-E processor and companion X79 chipset, a number of Intel’s memory partners released new quad-channel memory kits optimized for the platform. Previous Intel platforms were designed to offer optimal performance with two or three-channel memory configurations; Sandy Bridge-E and the X79 Express, however, perform best with a quad-channel setup. Around the same time, Intel had also defined a new Extreme Memory Profile (XMP 1.3) specification, for easy optimization and overclocking. As such, we thought it would be a good idea to round-up a varied group of quad-channel memory kit options to see how each... Read more...
One of Merriam-Webster's definitions for the word obscene is "so excessive as to be offensive." By that definition, Maingear sent us an obscenely spec'd SHIFT Super Stock X79 system packed to the hilt with so much decadent hardware that even the one percenters would feel guilty owning it, right up until the moment they pushed the power button and remembered exactly why it's so fun to be filthy rich. As configured, this thing costs $7,570, and that's after deducting $100 as part of Maingear's 'Spring Savings' promotion and before tacking on another $100 or so for shipping. It's not a configuration most of us will ever own -- it's more than half the price of a 5-door Kia Rio, for crying out loud... Read more...
One of Merriam-Webster's definitions for the word obscene is "so excessive as to be offensive." By that definition, Maingear sent us an obscenely spec'd SHIFT Super Stock X79 system packed to the hilt with so much decadent hardware that even the one percenters would feel guilty owning it, right up until the moment they pushed the power button and remembered exactly why it's so fun to be filthy rich. As configured, this thing costs $7,570, and that's after deducting $100 as part of Maingear's 'Spring Savings' promotion and before tacking on another $100 or so for shipping. It's not a configuration most of us will ever own -- it's more than half the price of a 5-door Kia Rio, for crying out loud... Read more...
Intel’s X58 chipset made for great platform performance, and even though the chip maker has unleashed many more chipsets since the X58 came out, there hasn’t been a true successor in the high-end of their product line-up (not even the Z68 chipset) until now. The X79 chipset looks to pick up the X58’s poll position, so we decided to bench test a few motherboards from ASRock, ASUS, and Gigabyte to see how Intel's new flagship performs.... Read more...
Intel’s X58 chipset made for great platform performance, and even though the chip maker has unleashed many more chipsets since the X58 came out, there hasn’t been a true successor in the high-end of their product line-up (not even the Z68 chipset) until now. The X79 chipset looks to pick up the X58’s poll position, so we decided to bench test a few motherboards from ASRock, ASUS, and Gigabyte to see how Intel's new flagship performs. The new X79 chipset brings with it a new socket (LGA 2011) and a crop of new Core i7 processors. There are several familiar features with the new processor series and its companion motherboard platform, such as Intel’s Turbo Boost 2.0, Hyper-Threading,... Read more...
Sandy Bridge-E chip? Check. X79 chipset? Check. Customizable gaming notebook? Check. AVADirect is clearly pleased to be offering systems based on the Clevo P270WM gaming notebook. The notebook replaces the Clevo X7200 and features the above CPU and chipset along with a trio of hard drives (with RAID options), the NVIDIA GTX 580M (2GB) or Quadro 5010M (4GN), and up to 32GB of 1866MHz quad-channel DDR3 RAM over four slots. Also look for two USB ports, SLI support, and HDMI. You’ll definitely pay for all those specs, though; the base price for the notebook is $3,000, with room to go up depending on configuration. The notebook is available today. AVADirect First To Offer X79 Gaming Notebook,... Read more...
On the one hand, it’s tempting to say, “We get it already, MSI, your military-class components help facilitate fantastic overclocking”, but on the other hand, it’s really fun to see just how far pro overclockers can push the envelope with MSI motherboards and Intel Sandy Bridge-E chips. According to a release from MSI, The answer as of right now is 5.83GHz, a feat accomplished by overclocker Turn&Burn using an MSI X79A-GD65 (8D) and an Intel Core i7-3930K processor. It’s the highest overclock currently achieved with a Sandy Bridge-E processor. Photo credit: HWbot The press release also mentioned that overclocker Toppc managed to nudge an Intel Core i7-3960X Extreme... Read more...
Although MSI isn’t revealing too many details on its new X79 and Z77 motherboards, the engineering samples were out and ready to ogle. As you can see from the photos, we got to look at a trio of the new boards. The Z77A-GD80 and Z77A-GD65 are kind of a pair, with the GD80s typically delivering some more features at a slightly higher cost than GD-65s; currently, though, with what little information we have to go on, there is little to differentiate the two. However, allegedly at least one MSI board will be packing Thunderbolt, and it’s reasonable to think it may be the GD80.           L to R: Z77A-GD65, Z77A-GD80, and Big Bang-XPower II Both... Read more...
In a lavish suite at the Trump Hotel in Las Vegas, Asus set up a number of existing and upcoming products for eager members of the technology press to ogle and get some hands-on time. In the suite, we had a chance to checkout a handful of upcoming X79 motherboards, nettops, netbooks, notebooks, and even a few tablets and a smartphone. One of the standout products had to be the new Transformer Prime TF700T, which builds upon the original design we showed you here, but adds an absolutely awesome WUXGA 1920x1200 resolution screen, a higher-resolution front facing camera, and reportedly more reliable Wi-Fi performance... CES 2012 Asus X79 Boards, Transformer TF700T Action    ... Read more...
In a lavish suite at the Trump Hotel in Las Vegas, Asus set up a number of existing an upcoming products for eager members of the technology press to ogle and get some hands-on time. In the suite, we had a chance to checkout a handful of upcoming X79 motherboards, nettops, netbooks, notebooks, and even a few tablets and a smartphone. One of the standout products had to be the new Transformer Prime TF700T, which builds upon the original design we showed you here, but adds an absolutely awesome WUXGA 1920x1200 resolution screen, a higher-resolution front facing camera, and reportedly more reliable Wi-Fi performance.  A video of the Transformer Prime TF700T is posted above. As you can see,... Read more...
When you think of “compact” or “small form factor”, it’s all too easy to make the leap to “weak” or “underpowered”, but AVADirect’s two new small systems are anything but. The company announced a compact gaming system and a workstation, and both systems pack a wallop. The Compact Gaming PC can be configured with an Intel Core i7-3930K or Core i7-3960K Extreme, up to 32GB of DDR3-1333MHz memory, up to two HDDs or SSDs, and up to a pair of graphics cards. The system also boasts a liquid cooling system and a chassis designed for easy portability. Compact Gaming PC Like the Compact Gaming PC, the Workstation PC features a six-core Intel... Read more...
Speaking of MSI, the company announced its X79 chipset-based MSI Big Bang-XPower II. Billed as a flagship motherboard, the Big Bang-XPower II features 8 DIMM slots that support a total of 128GB of system memory, 4-way SLI/CrossFire X (with PCI-E Gen 3 support), and a 22-phase PWM design. There are plenty of features for overclockers, including V-Check Points, Direct OC, Easy Button 3, and the ability to turn graphics card slots off or on. And of course, the board is loaded with military-class components. For Xtreme Only - MSI Big Bang-XPower II Featuring 22-phase PWM design and the support of 4-way NVIDIA SLI / AMD CrossFire technology (Industry, CA) -- Leading mainboard manufacturer MSI announces... Read more...
The one-two combo of Intel’s X79 chipset and six-core Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition CPU is a potent one--especially, it seems, for overclockers. MSI reports that overclockers all over the world are juicing their Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition chips to 5GHz on X79-based MSI motherboards using air cooling alone. MSI singled out one source, Guru 3D, which specifically hit 5.2GHz with an MSI X79A-GD65 (8D) board. 5GHz is nothing to sniff at, especially considering that the Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition has a stock clock of 3.3GHz (3.9GHz Turbo). MSI points to its Military-Class III components, including DrMOS II, as a reason why its boards can handle that kind of heat. Whatever the reason, it’s... Read more...
Back in the days of old, overclocking used to require setting DIP switches and chanting prayers to the gods of clockspeed and stability. There was a good chance you could burn something up, and if you did, the motherboard vendor would simply shrug. And today? Some of them will still shrug with indifference if you kill your hardware by overclocking, but the culture has changed dramatically. Not only do motherboard makers routinely tout overclocking-friendly features, but they actively participate in OCing competitions and are quick to brag when their gear is used to set new world records. Today is Gigabyte's day to gloat. Renowned overclocker "Hicoookie" achieved a new high clockspeed on the Intel... Read more...
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