Items tagged with Ubuntu

As we noted earlier, Valve is digging into a Linux version of Steam and the Source engine. Rather than open the Beta to everyone, the software publisher is looking for a small pool of players to test the new platform. Understandably, Valve wants experienced Linux users and has previously stated that people who are considering getting into Linux for the first time should sit out the Valve Linux Beta. If you’re a Linux guru and a Steam fan, though, your chance to prove it and earn a spot in the Beta pool has arrived.   Got Linux? Get your game on. The Beta Application asks the kind of questions you might expect, such as “Which Linux distribution will you be running Steam... Read more...
We’ll be honest, when pondering Ubuntu’s naming scheme, we were quite curious what Canonical was going to use for “Q”. Well, here it is: Quantal Quetzal, the code name for Ubuntu version 12.10, and it’s now available. One of the main focuses of Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal is the integration of the desktop and the cloud. For example, the Dash search feature will pull up results not only from the local machine, but also from online sources such as Google Drive, Flickr, and Facebook and even music and video content on Amazon and Ubuntu One. This is made possible by the Online Accounts feature that authenticates online sites so they’re indexed in the search. Dash... Read more...
Looking for a little more Linux in your life? You won't have to wait too much longer. Ubuntu is one of the best known builds, and while Quantal Quetzal won't ship until a few more weeks (Oct. 18th), there's no stopping forward progress. A timeline has already been set for Ubuntu 13.04, with Decembest 1st listed as the date where we'll see it hit the first alpha. Once Feb. 7th hits, it'll be on to the second stage. By the time we get to April, a final release should be ready for the masses. You may wonder why it's so vital for a Linux flavor to lay out such a roadmap, but in fact, we wish all operating systems did this. Having clear and precise roadmaps keeps everyone on target, and constantly... Read more...
Valve’s much-ballyhooed expansion of the Source engine and Steam to the Linux world just took a major step forward with the announcement of a private external beta. If you’re running Ubuntu, you could be one of the lucky 1,000 users to take Steam and a Valve game for a spin sometime in October. Of course, if you’re really lucky, you’re probably gearing up for the private internal beta, which starts next week. Mere mortals can watch the Valve Linux team blog for the sign-up sheet, which has yet to be posted. In a blog post today, the team says that, while Big Picture mode won’t be available in the beta, you’ll have everything you need: Steam and... Read more...
We don’t usually get to make puns about a product “launching”, but Dell made it easy by naming its latest foray into Linux-based computers “Project Sputnik”. Dell said that Sputnik is the result of an internal innovation fund and has been employee-driven. Essentially, Project Sputnik will consist of a developer notebook based on the Dell XPS 13 running Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) featuring a “complete client-to-cloud solution” that will let users create micro clouds locally and then deploy them seamlessly. Dell launched Sputnik as a pilot program not long ago, and due to the overwhelming response, the company decided to move it into the product... Read more...
Mmm, Steam'd penguins. Sounds delightful, doesn't it? Good news, Linux fans -- the developers at Valve are hard at work cooking up a version of the Steam game platform to serve up to the open-source community, along with a side dish of the Source game engine (and Left 4 Dead 2 specifically), both of which it plans to port over to Ubuntu. We know that last bit will elicit some groans from die-hard Linux users who'd rather not touch Ubuntu with a ten-foot pole, but hey, it's a start. "Why Ubuntu? There are a couple of reasons for that. First, we're just starting development and working with a single distribution is critical when you are experimenting, as we are," Valve stated in a blog post. "Secondly,... Read more...
Price-wise, HardKernel’s ODROID-X Development Board ($129) doesn’t hold a candle to the like of Raspberry Pi ($35), but it packs some tasty features that tinkers will love to play with. The ARM-based platform is built around a quad-core Samsung Exynos 4412 Cortex-A9 (1.4GHz) processor and has Mali-400 quad core graphics, 1GB of LP-DDR2 RAM, and Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich (although users can slap Ubuntu on there, too). In terms of I/O, the ODROID-X has a micro HDMI connector, RGB-24bit LCD interface port, headphone and mic jacks, six USB 2.0 ports, 10/100 Ethernet LAN port, a full-size SDHC card slot, and more. Although the specs are compelling enough, the accessories that you... Read more...
Almost two months after Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Precise Pangolin hit beta, Canonical announced that the final product is ready for download. Precise Pangolin is a long-term release, so users are guaranteed five years of updates and support. Running the Unity GUI, Precise Pangolin users can opt to run office applications remotely with virtualization, use browser-based programs, or run the many native productivity programs. Commercial support is optional and consists of audit, compliance, and ongoing maintenance; users can choose between covering all deployed machines with Canonical’s support or just a select group. Canonical also mentioned in the press release that Ubuntu 12.04 LTS is certified... Read more...
If you’re looking for a weekend project, having a go at the latest Ubuntu (beta) release would be a fun one. Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin, a long-term support (LTS) release, is now in beta and available for download from Canonical. Being an LTS release, there aren’t a lot of earth-shattering changes, but Canonical has definitely tweaked things a bit. New features include making Rhythmbox (which includes access to the Ubuntu One Music Store) the default music player, an update to LibreOffice (v.3.5), some minor interface improvements, increased support for ClickPad devices (where a physical button is built into a trackpad), and more. Overall, version 12.04 looks a lot like version... Read more...
“In every dual-core phone, there’s a PC trying to get out”, says the tagline on Canonical’s Ubuntu for Android page. It’s true that the specs on high-end smartphones these days are impressive to say the least, with more processing cores, better graphics, more storage, and 4G data speeds, but Canonical apparently thinks they have enough horsepower to double as desktop PCs. With Ubuntu for Android, your phone experience is the same Android experience you’d normally get, but when the phone is docked with a keyboard, mouse, and monitor, you get a full screen Ubuntu experience. Ubuntu runs simultaneously with Android, so you can access all your contacts, calendars,... Read more...
CTL probably isn't on your short list of laptop makers if you're in the market for a new notebook, but if you're specifically looking for an Ubuntu-powered machine, perhaps the Oregon-based outfit should be. The 14.1-inch MB40U is CTL's first Ubuntu compatible notebook, and the company's pretty excited about it. So much, in fact, that it's already looking ahead to more Ubuntu products. "CTL is very pleased to introduce our line of notebooks and desktops based on Ubuntu version 11.10. Ubuntu has emerged as one of the most popular and user-friendly Linux operating systems in the market. With Ubuntu, users can have full desktop experience supported by a robust ecosystem and a full suite of free... Read more...
In a blog post today, Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth outlined the company’s plans for bringing Ubuntu to pretty much every screen with intelligence that you can possibly have, from your phone to your TV to your kitchen (assuming you have some kind of smart screen device in your kitchen). In the post, Shuttleworth said, “By 14.04 LTS Ubuntu will power tablets, phones, TVs and smart screens from the car to the office kitchen, and it will connect those devices cleanly and seamlessly to the desktop, the server and the cloud.” How might this feat be accomplished? By leveraging Ubuntu’s Unity interface, which is designed to deliver a unified (hence the name) user experience... Read more...
Canonical’s Desktop Ubuntu releases are on a predictable schedule; the short-term releases are on a 6-month cycle, and every two years a Long Term Release (LTS) rolls out, which Canonical supports for three years with updates and maintenace. The LTS support cycle for Ubuntu Server, on the other hand, extends for five years, which makes a lot of sense in a corporate environment. Starting with Ubuntu 12.04, Canonical is aligning support for the desktop version with the server edition by extending it from three to five years. The idea--which is a good one--is to make it slightly more compelling and sensible for companies to run Ubuntu on their desktops along with their servers. The five-year... Read more...
Reports from a variety of sources indicate that the forthcoming Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot) will feature ARM architecture support as well as a variety of cloud features. At the Open Stack conference in Boston this week, Jane Silber, CEO of Canonical (which makes Ubuntu), gave a keynote wherein she teased details of the upcoming distro, which is due to launch this week--Thursday, October 13th, to be exact. This distribution of Ubuntu will run on the ARM architecture, although apparently it’s a little unpolished as of yet. Oneiric Ocelot will also feature OpenStack’s Diablo software and a cloud services tool called JuJu that automates starting up and shutting down cloud services on... Read more...
Lion and Windows 8 may be stealing their share (and then some) of the spotlight, but that's not to say that other operating systems are just sitting on their laurels. Ubuntu, perhaps the most popular flavor of Linux for the consumer world, is about to release their newest version. Oneiric Ocelot is on the edge of launch, with Ubuntu 11.10 arriving October 13th. What's interesting about this upcoming launch is just how much effort is going into promoting is, and moreover, shrouding it in mystery. A new teaser site has launched with the sole purpose of getting you interested in Ubuntu, with "a whole new world" and "a whole new computer" promised. There are no details on what v11.10 will bring,... Read more...
Commodore USA LLC promised a working C64 replica (with modern internals) by "late spring," but despite a tie-in with Tron: Legacy, nothing has shipped yet. However, in a YouTube post (somewhat less obvious that a press release, guys) the company has promised pre-orders will begin shipping this week. Commodore USA posted the video, which shows their Florida facilities, on Friday, June 17. It's just a montage, really, but the post with the video at YouTube's site has the important info: shipping of pre-orders begin this week. Pricing ranges all the way from $250 (for a pretty much empty chassis) to $895. The C64 will sport a mini-ITX PC motherboard featuring a dual-core D525 Atom CPU (1.8Ghz) and... Read more...
How time flies!  Every six months, Ubuntu releases the next iteration of their popular desktop Linux distribution, and today is just such a day.  Ubuntu has officially released version 11.04 "Natty Narwhal".  There are thousands of package updates in this release, but what follows are some of the more notable items. Desktop: The default desktop environment for Ubuntu is now the Unity Desktop. Previous versions used the Gnome Panel, which in Gnome 3.0 is being replaced by the Gnome Shell. Due to the high level of integration between Gnome Shell and the Mutter window manager, and the wide array of platforms targeted by Ubuntu, the Canonical team opted for Unity as the default desktop... Read more...
If you are one of the people that happens to be running a bleeding-edge 'alpha 1' version of Ubuntu Linux on your main desktop machine (and who isn't?), you may have noticed a particular change in recent days: OpenOffice has been replaced by LibreOffice for the upcoming (next April) Ubuntu 11.04 release. What is OpenOffice, what is LibreOffice, and what is the difference? For those unaware, both OpenOffice and LibreOffice are free open-source office software suites which include word processor, spreadsheet, presentation apps, graphic design tools, and database systems. Both of these suites are available for multiple platforms, including Windows, Mac, and Linux. LibreOffice itself is a fork of... Read more...
If you have an iPhone or iPod, a large collection of MP3s and a great home theater system, Ubuntu has an app for you. The Linux distro maker has introduced a way to stream the music from its cloud to your home system using Apple's AirPlay. You'll also need an audio/video component that supports AirPlay such as an Apple TV, or one of the AirPlay-supported third-party stereo electronics from Denon, Marantz, or iHome. And wait ... one more thing. You'll need a paid account with Ubuntu One Music. While Ubuntu does offers 2G of free storage for music and other files, in order to stream from your mobile device, you'll need to sign up for Ubuntu's $4/month Mobile Package. Ubuntu... Read more...
While there's still no official word on which PC manufacturers will produce a Ubuntu touch netbook, the company released a sneak-peak video that shows it's new Netbook Edition Unity interface and gesture library in action. Ubuntu has so far certified a list of 27 laptops and 7 netbooks that work with its full-fledged recent 10.10 release, but has certified none yet for its Unity interface with a touch screen. However, one of those stamped-for-approval netbooks is Dell's Latitude 2100, which includes a touchscreen. The rumor is that the Dell Latitude 2100 does pretty well with Unity installed The demo sure looks like its being done on a Dell Latitude XT2 Tablet PC, perhaps another clue as to which... Read more...
HotHardware guest post by:  Jesse Litton The new version of the most popular desktop Linux distribution (according to DistroWatch statistics) is now available, and as always:  completely free to use, redistribute, fold, spindle, and mutilate.  The announcement e-mail can be found here. (Ubuntu 10.10 LiveCD) New/updated features: Linux Kernel 2.6.35 Improved CPU power savings and turbo support.. Improved GPU power management. Network code optimizations (RPS/RFS) for multicore CPUs. Defragmentation of working memory. Virtualization improvements. Direct I/O support for Btrfs file system. Improved scalability (BKL eliminations). Support for EDAC on Core i7 and Xeon CPUs. Hundred of... Read more...
On Sunday, Canonical will release Ubuntu 10.10 in netbook, desktop and server editions. The netbook version will include support for touch through a new user interface, Unity. The Unity interface was designed from scratch for netbooks and has been available to developers and netbook OEMs since May. It eliminates lessor-used icons, rearranges the remaining ones and includes a new panel and application launcher that makes it easier to find preferred netbook apps like the browser. When it comes to touch, Unity can be used in combination with Canonical's "libutouch" gesture libraries, which lets users perform complex tasks with strings of specific gestures. As Canonical VP Steve George explained... Read more...
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