Items tagged with tiger lake-b

It appears as though Intel's upcoming NUC 11 Extreme "Beast Canyon" kit is now in the wild, as it has made an apparent 3DMark benchmark cameo, with a newfangled Tiger Lake-B series processor in tow. According to two separate listings, the Beast Canyon system is also wielding a full-size NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 graphics card, 16MB of DDR4 memory, and a 1TB WN Black SN750 NVMe SSD. You may recall that Intel teased its Beast Canyon NUC during this year's virtual Computex event. At the time, Intel was short on details, saying only that it will be available with 11th Generation Core i9, i7, and i5 processors, and will support full-length graphics cards, including NVIDIA's latest generation GeForce... Read more...
Intel teased its upcoming "Beast Canyon" NUC 11 Extreme system late last month at virtual Computex 2021. It should be an exciting entry for gamers looking to tap "extreme" performance in a small form factor chassis. Unfortunately, the company was relatively light on details, only confirming that it would be available with 11th generation Core i5/i7/i9 processors and support full-length graphics cards (including the latest GeForce and Radeon cards from NVIDIA and AMD). Now, thanks to a fresh leak, we're getting a look inside Beast Canyon and learning about at least one available processor option. Beast Canyon uses Intel's proprietary Compute Element card that features major components like the... Read more...
If you thought Alder Lake-S would be Intel's next desktop processor launch, think again. There's a new CPU line that was launched without any boisterous announcement or fanfare, that being Tiger Lake. Yes, Tiger Lake already exists, but not just in mobile form anymore—Intel ported its Tiger Lake architecture over to the desktop. There are four new SKUs, each with a new "B" suffix. Well, the top model carries the "KB" suffix, because it is also an unlocked processor. So what does the B designation mean? In a statement, Intel essentially confirmed speculation that the B means BGA, as these new chips are ball grid array parts that are soldered directly to the motherboard, rather than LGA (land... Read more...