Items tagged with RIM

We like our internet, and we like it FREE. Newspaper websites have trouble even getting people to register, never mind pay, for content. Even the mighty New York Times  has recently abandoned their attempt to get people to pay for their columnists. But somebody's got to pay for the internet. Unfortunately for many internet sites, that "somebody" has been advertising by so-called "subprime" mortgage lenders. And that party's over. Many online companies rely for a disproportionate amount of their income on financial services advertising, with subprime in some cases accounting for a large part of it, the FT said. Sixteen percent of all online advertising comes... Read more...
Way back in early June, HotHardware told you that Mozilla was considering configuring the next iteration of their Firefox web browser to detect malicious code, and to warn users not to open infected websites. The next version of Firefox is indeed being developed to do just that, and may or may not even allow you to override the warning and load the page.  Security company Sophos reported last month that the number of malicious Web sites has skyrocketed over the past few months, from 5,000 new ones a day in April to nearly 30,000 a day in early July. One reason, according to Sophos researchers, is that hackers are increasingly turning away from e-mail as their preferred method of... Read more...
Waterloo-based Research In Motion Ltd. has recently penetrated the Chinese market after a grueling eight-year effort. Last month, the Chinese Ministry of Information Industry gave RIM a pass to sell its handsets in China. According to a manager at RIM’s Beijing office, the company plans to launch the 8700g in Chinese shops at the end of August. The company has received about 5,000 pre-orders for the 8700g, mostly from foreign multinationals with operations in China and from local corporate customers. Moreover, reports say that RIM is even considering the production of devices in China itself. In Asia, RIM has already infiltrated the South Korea, Indian, and Japanese markets.... Read more...
Combine a radiator that looks like it's from a 1967 Ford Fairlane, some heat paste, and a nice quiet fan, and what do you get? Enzotechnology's Ultra-X chilled overclocking goodness. BurnoutPC has the skinny with lots of pictures. And graphs. We love graphs. The Enzotechnology Ultra-X clearly shows the lowest temperatures compared to the rest. On low fan settings this cooler is dead silent, the fan hardly spins but the temperature is only increased by 6 degrees when fully stressed. The Coolscraper 120 with the 120mm fan attached was breathing down the neck of the Ultra-X but only by little. The Ultra-X was performing better when my system... Read more...
McAfee's semi-annual overview of their on-going security research says that cyber-criminals are becoming more sophisticated, and are banding together in loose associations to swap code and deliver support for their nefarious endeavors. They've got their eye on your smartphone, too. Among the specific trends outlined in the report are expectations for the continued growth of botnets with the cooperation among hackers adding to the problem via group efforts to develop and refine threat code in the same manner that open-source contributors work in a community. The vast majority of botnets will continue to target flaws in Microsoft products and propagate themselves through buffer overflows,... Read more...
Analysts are predicting widespread problems and computer malfunctions due to a potential bug in some software that won't be able to handle the new Daylight Savings time rules. The scenario is eerily reminiscent of the dreaded "Y2K" bug which sent nearly everyone into a frenzy. "Actually, it's a potential problem in any software that was programmed before a 2005 law decreed that daylight-saving time would start three weeks earlier and end one week later, beginning this year. Congress decided that more early evening daylight would translate into energy savings." My prediction?  Absolutely... Read more...
Cyber crimes have been on the rise over the years, but so haven't the number of overall net users. While every society has its share of the not so decent, will the Internet, with it's ability to provide criminals easy access to money, merchandise, people, and privacy, eventually be overrun by them? If security and user knowledge don't continue to improve, anything's possible. "Up to a quarter of computers on the net may be used by cyber criminals in so-called botnets, said Vint Cerf, one of the fathers of the internet. Technology writer John Markoff said: "It's as bad as you can imagine, it puts the whole internet at risk." The... Read more...
Hardware Upgrade has an interesting article on the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) project and its roadmap for the immediate future. With its new interfaces, ship dates and commitments it seems OLPC is ready for the world. From the article: To achieve its goal of transforming the learning process, OLPCs will come with a slim and unique version of Linux that is geared towards education. Instead of the conventional windows and files approach, the home screen of these computers will be centered on a stick-figure icon. A white ring surrounding the stick-figure will display all programs that the student is currently running. The desktop (or "neighborhood"... Read more...
No, not those kind of games, we're talking about online gambling here. A recent bill that aims to ban online gambling may sound like a good idea to some, but John J. Farmer, New Jersey's attorney general, says the ban has the potential to drive folks to unregulated web sites for their gambling needs. Farmer not only feels that the bill is a bad idea, but will also be short lived. "Farmer, now a partner in law firm Kirkpatrick & Lockhart Nicholson Graham, said he studied the legality of online gaming in 1999, when the State of New Jersey was concerned about criminal operators. "In 1999, there were operators taking bets and not paying... Read more...
Madshrimps have posted a short over-clocking guide for the X1900 series of cards. The article goes over the different software tools, cooling, basic and advanced over-clocking options. The guide should be useful for anyone starting out in over-clocking. You currently own an x1900 series video card but you are now itching to compete and get the maximum out of your card. Some would wonder at this fact simply because this is arguably the fastest GPU available (when this guide was written). But we all want the most out of our investments and this is one way of doing it. But it does come with a risk.... Read more...
Movies have always featured computers that perform actions based on user voice commands. Although voice interfaces are still not common place in homes today, for many years software has been available for speech recognition. Anandtech has posted an intresting article, discussing all aspects of speed recognition software currently available for computers. Issues such as health consideration, software products, speech accuracy, and processor utilization are explained in detail. Why does any of this really matter? I mean, we're all basically familiar with using keyboards and mice, and they seem to get the job done quite well. Certainly, it's difficult to imagine... Read more...
Be it software, service, or just about anything else, there's almost always some teething problems. Google's Video Store is certainly no exception. As Ars Technica explains, there are some serious issues Google needs to deal with, and some areas Google is improving on. "The Google Video Store may have launched more than two weeks ago, but it's still clearly not ready for primetime. The company and its partners have taken notice of the lackluster launch and concomitant panning of the service in the press, and they've taken some steps recently to improve things. How does the situation stand now? Read on for my look at some of the initial problems... Read more...
The team at Bigbruin got to thinking one day and decided to run a RAID experiment using USB thumbdrives.  This is more of a proof-of-concept article as the need for RAIDed USB drives are minimal.  Nonetheless, it's refreshing to see someone think outside the box from time to time, and this experiment proved to be an interesting read in the least.The idea of a thumb drive RAID array might not be practical for every day needs, but it is a novel idea that could be of benefit to some people. For one, owners of mini-ITX systems that boot from a flash drive might be interested in the sizable speed burst a RAID 0 array could provide... In the end, results were achieved that showed great promise... Read more...
PowerColor X800 GT Xtreme Edition Review @ The Tech Zone: "Power for the X800 GT Xtreme is provided by ATI's R480 chipset running at 500MHz. This is 25MHz faster than the standard X800 GT. The Xtreme achieves this higher core speed with a better cooling solution. The normal X800 GT use 256 Meg of 2ns GDDR3 memory running at 980MHz. The Xtreme version use 1.6ns memory running at 1050MHz. All together, it adds up to a faster video card for just a few dollars more." HTPC Primer, Part II @ Bigbruin.com: "In the first of a two-part series of Tech Tips on getting started with a Home Theater PC, or HTPC, we looked at the two most basic features to be considered: audio and video. With... Read more...
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