Items tagged with print

If you’ve been watching with unease as the world slowly shifts from print books to ebooks, a recent study on the subject will give you some extra ammunition. Researchers at Stavanger University in Norway carried out a study that seemed to suggest people have better reading comprehension when they read paper books than they do when they read books on digital devices. The study is fairly small and clearly won’t settle the debate, but it provides some interesting new food for thought. The test, which was performed with 50 readers, involved a 28-page short story. Half of the readers read the story on a Kindle and the other half read the story in a print book. When questioned after reading... Read more...
It's easy to view the overall decline in the print newspaper business, coupled with the surge in e-reader and tablet ownership, as a death knell for paper books. After all, the printed word has been around for so long, that surely it must be on its way out -- right? Well, perhaps in some instances, but not in others. A new Rasmussen Report suggests that three in four U.S.-based readers "still prefer a traditional book over an electronic book-reading device and continue to reads books that way." The report is based on a telephone survey, and it found that 75% of American Adults would rather read a book in a traditional print format than on an electronic book-reading device like a Kindle. Fifteen... Read more...
Google is officially bringing support for wireless printing to smartphones and tablets with the release of its new Cloud Print App for Android devices. With the Google Cloud Print application, you'll be able to print from any compatible Android device running the app to any Google Cloud Print connected printer. You can also track the status of your print jobs from the app. Google Cloud Print works with a variety of web-connected devices including your phone, tablet, Chromebook, and PC. When using the app on your smartphone or tablet, the Google Cloud Print option will appear in the sharing menu. As a result, nearly any application with the sharing option will be able to print content. Depending... Read more...
These days, you don't need a giant piece of kit for a lot of computations to occur. Just look at this phone-sized box. It's Lantronix's new xPrintServer, which now supports enterprise-wide mobile printing for workplaces that frequently find themselves packed with iPad, iPhone and other mobile devices. It's the Office Edition, and it's engineered to let busy professionals print from their iOS products to virtually any printer. Put simply, it enables printing directly from the native print menu of the device to network-connected printers without any apps to download, software to install, or need to buy a new printer. Here's a bit more direct from the company: The soon-to-be released Office Edition... Read more...
Another print publication bites the dust. This time it's PlayStation: The Official Magazine that's closing its doors, ending what had been a 15-year run with the upcoming Holiday issue. Though print media has struggled to find relevance in an increasingly digital world, the move is still a little surprising when you consider that "PlayStation" is an iconic console brand, and consoles have never been more popular than they are right now. There hasn't been an official announcement (that we're aware of), though Game Informer claims to have confirmed the magazine's cancellation with publisher Future US. Earlier this year, Future US announced that Nintendo Power would also cease publication in December,... Read more...
If a tree rejoices in the forest but nobody is around to hear it, does it still sound like jubilation? We may never know the answer, but we imagine there are several of them hootin' and hollerin' to the news that Newsweek is abandoning its print business model and transitioning to all-digital format in "early 2013." Newsweek made the announcement on The Daily Beast, an online rag it merged with in 2012 to create The Newsweek Daily Beast Company. If you're a collector type, keep your eye peeled for the December 31 issue of Newsweek, which will be the final print version. Ever. "Newsweek Global, as the all-digital publication will be named, will be a single, worldwide edition targeted for a highly... Read more...
Apple has a way of creating amazing products, but then leaving out one or two somewhat obvious features. Some argue that this is their way of ensuring that early adopters are enticed to upgrade, but that's not the case here. Instead, Apple will be giving a free software update to all existing iPad owners that will add a killer feature that should have been there from launch day. iOS 4.2 is coming together nicely for the iPad, as it's supposed to launch sometime "this Fall." Apple has this week revealed that the new software will feature something new, a little function called AirPrint. This will allow iPad users to print documents, images and more from their tablets without any cords, and better... Read more...
A lot of things have changed in technology over the past decade. Broadband has replaced dial-up. 1GHz now seems slow. Netbooks are now a reality. Tablets are coming back. Change is everywhere, but some things have sadly remained the same. Printers are still stuck in the stone-age, and ink still costs far more than it reasonably should. Leave it to Google to take a hard look at a technology that hasn't really changed much and, well, change it.Google's latest attempt to innovate where others have simply overlooked is in printing, and interestingly, this attempt is being tied to the forthcoming Chrome OS. There's no denying that Google thinks that the future is in the cloud. Google Cal, Google Docs... Read more...
Though it likely doesn't come as a huge shock to anyone, the amount of time that 8- to 18-year-olds spend engrossed in entertainment media of some sort or another — TV, music, Internet, video games, movies and even (GASP!) print — has increased dramatically over the past five years.In fact, on average, the young'uns are spending as much time focusing on entertainment daily as the average adult does at work. Even more, if you consider the average work week is just five days, while this is spread over seven days, the Kaiser Family Foundation found in its most recent study. Here's a quick breakdown of some of the key findings: 7 hours and 38 minutes: Amount of time devoted to entertainment media... Read more...
An upcoming issue of Entertainment Weekly’s print magazine will feature a video advertisement that plays on an embedded video player. The ad’s package will likely remind you of the heavy-paper packaging found in the novelty greeting cards that play sound. The player will have a roughly two-inch screen with a speaker embedded below it. Similar to the greeting cards, the ad will start playing automatically when the page flips open. The player is scheduled to run ads for CBS shows and Pepsi. CBS and Entertainment Weekly have billed the video advertisement as the first to ever appear in a print magazine. CBS hasn’t disclosed what it is paying for the ad, but since the idea behind this new experiment... Read more...
We remember (and this will date us) when the first issues of PC Magazine, founded in 1982, came out. As time progressed, the magazine because huge, pushing 600 pages at the max if we remember correctly (and it's been a while), much of which was advertising. We recall looking at the tome once and trying to figure out how much was actual content. That was then, this is now. I'm assuming you don't need anyone to tell you how sour recent times have been for newspapers and all forms of print media. Blame it on the Internet. With many consumers simply going online for information, most of which is free, the age of print media is dying. On Wednesday Ziff-Davis, which recently exited bankruptcy, announced... Read more...
It’s hard to avoid making comparisons to Apple’s iPhone when you mention the HTC Touch Diamond. Although they are very different phones running on different operating systems, the Touch Diamond is arguably one of the closest competitors in the U.S. market today to the popular iPhone in terms of unique touch controls, an attractive looking user interface, power and versatility. Even though the phones compete in some areas, it’s important to understand that there’s a big difference between the Touch Diamond and the iPhone in terms of their intended users. You see, HTC designed the Touch Diamond as a Windows Mobile, business-friendly device. Click the link below and take a look... Sprint HTC Touch... Read more...
It’s hard to avoid making comparisons to Apple’s iPhone when you mention the HTC Touch Diamond. Although they are very different phones running on different operating systems, the Touch Diamond is arguably one of the closest competitors in the U.S. market today to the popular iPhone in terms of unique touch controls, an attractive looking user interface, power and versatility. Even though the phones compete in some areas, it’s important to understand that there’s a big difference between the Touch Diamond and the iPhone in terms of their intended users. You see, HTC designed the Touch Diamond as a Windows Mobile, business-friendly device. Apple designed the iPhone from the ground up as a... Read more...
We’re not so sure what to think of this: According to recent reports, Sprint’s CEO Dan Hesse reportedly made a comment to the National Press Club in Washington, saying that Android (in its current form) is not “good enough to put the Sprint brand on it.” Although we can’t weigh in on Android’s usefulness with much personal experience quite yet, this is a very strong comment, especially given the fact that Android is the first truly revolutionary thing to happen to mobile phones in a while. Thankfully, Hesse didn’t completely rule out the possibility of an Android phone in the future. We’ve heard rumors of a delay in a Sprint Android phone before, so maybe, just maybe, the two have something to... Read more...
Gasoline costs four bucks, but a gallon of it will get you twenty or thirty miles farther away from your mother-in-law, so it's worth it. Printer ink is famously expensive, going for upwards of $8000 a gallon, but at least you can use it to print a letter to the editor of your newspaper complaining about high gasoline prices. Lots of things are expensive, but we're hard pressed to come up with anything that seems to costs so much for how little you get than a text message. All the major carriers are raising their price for a single text message to an astonishing twenty cents. 140 bytes of data for twenty cents. If the same pricing was applied on a per-byte basis to downloading one 4MB song it... Read more...
Everyone's fascinated with the Apple iPhone. Apple's announced their new, third generation (3G) model is coming out on July 11, and all the news outlets have been pawing over the details of the handset and the plan. The iPhone has the potential to be one of those concepts that becomes the name people use to refer to all items of its type, like Kleenex or Frigidaire or Xerox once did. Not many people are that interested in the Samsung/Sprint version of the small slab smartphone with a touchscreen and not a lot of buttons. Maybe they should be. It's better than an iPhone in a lot of ways.• It's smaller, fitting more comfortably in a pocket.• It records video. The iPhone only does stills.•... Read more...
Hewett Packard must have IBM envy. They've purchased Ross Perot's old technology services company, Electronic Data Systems,  for $13.2 billion, so they can claim to be the second place provider of such services to businesses and government, behind IBM.  As usual, the first rule of Takeover Club is: you're fired. It's a field dominated by IBM, which generated $54 billion in revenue from technology services last year. HP's technology services revenue will more than double to more than $38 billion with the addition of EDS, which had $22 billion in revenue last year.To make sure the EDS takeover pays off, HP indicated it will make significant layoffs as it eliminates overlapping jobs and... Read more...
The "most published author in the history of the planet" doesn't write much of anything. Philip Parker has "authored" more than 200,000 books, on topics that would seem to be of little interest to the average person. He's done it by developing computer algorithms that collect publicly available information on the Web, and then compiles the information and uses print on demand to produce a copy for an interested reader - and makes money even if only one person buys it. If you're interested in "The 2007-2012 Outlook for Tufted Washable Scatter Rugs, Bathmats and Sets That Measure 6-Feet by 9-Feet or Smaller in India," you can grab a copy for $495. If this sounds like cheating to the layman’s ear,... Read more...
Web-enabled businesses (are there any other kind any more?) are always on the lookout for security breaches, and rightfully so, as hackers are working day and night to find overlooked vulnerabilities and exploit them. But office information security managers might be forgetting one fairly large exposure to the risk of stolen information:The networked multifunction printerThomas Ptacek, principal and founder at New York-based penetration testing firm Matasano Security, said the risk is more than just theoretical."Should my mom be worried that a hacker is living in her printer? No. But, if you're a Fortune 500 company, vulnerable printers on your network is a scary thing," Ptacek said in an interview... Read more...
All cubicle workers have stories about the time they hit "Reply All" instead of "Reply" and embarrassed themselves in the office. But in what might be the mother of all misdirected e-mail disasters, a lawyer representing drugmaker Eli Lilly in confidential settlement talks with the government had both Bradford Berenson, who is her co-counsel, and Alex Berenson, who is a New York Times reporter, in her address book. You can see where this is going.Alex Berenson logged on to find an internal "very comprehensive document" about the negotiations, the consultant said, and on January 30, Berenson's article, "Lilly in Settlement Talks With U.S." appeared on the Times' website. A similar article followed... Read more...
Cisco Systems has introduced a new data center switch, to go with the new Fiber Channel Over Ethernet standard networking platform, that is mind-bogglingly powerful and fast. With the increasing demand placed on networks by high bandwith applications like video, and the amount of just plain data that any business generates, data centers are constantly struggling to increase capacity. Cisco's new Nexus 7000 will allow greater consolidation of data centers because even enormous amounts of information can be moved to and from remote storage locations fast. How fast is fast? Cisco says that the new data-center switch would be able to copy all the searchable data on the Internet in 7.5 minutes,... Read more...
It is no secret that in the printer market, the money is all in the consumables.  Paper, ink, and the like are where the money is made, not printers themselves.  As such, a Boston man has filed a lawsuit against Staples and HP on collusion and anti-trust grounds.A Boston man has filed a class-action lawsuit accusing hardware maker HP and office supply retailer Staples of colluding to inflate the price of printer ink cartridges in violation of federal antitrust law. According to the suit, HP allegedly paid Staples $100 million to refrain from selling inexpensive third-party ink cartridges, although the suit doesn't make it clear how plaintiff Ranjit Bedi arrived at that figure.For most... Read more...
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