Items tagged with Llano

Llano has once again surfaced from the murky deaths to make headlines in the tech world. The last time we talked about AMD’s Llano Accelerated Processing Unit (APU), AMD investors filed a lawsuit against the company regarding its hyping up the product’s 2011 launch. “[AMD] repeatedly highlighted the strong and significant interest in, demand for, and unit shipments of its Llano APUs,” said the plaintiffs in the 2014 filing. “Defendants falsely and misleadingly represented that AMD's desktop business was in a 'strong position' and that it would continue to rebound in 2012,” which was allegedly a violation of federal securities laws.AMD Llano Die Shot Well, here we are over three years later, and... Read more...
Update: Sharp-eyed reader Justin Jaynes has pointed out that the Llano lawsuit against AMD has been filed by lawyers  hoping to convince investors to jump onboard, not by AMD itself. We've updated the story accordingly. There's two pieces of news on the AMD front as the company prepares to announce earnings this week, but neither are particularly happy. First, there's a persistent rumor from the GPU side of the equation that the 2011-era Macbook Pro's with AMD's discrete graphics are beginning to fail in higher-than-expected numbers with reports of graphics corruption and other intermittent issues. The relevant forum thread claims that the problem pops up when the laptops are under heavy... Read more...
Numbers from Jon Peddie Research on the current state of the graphics market point to Nvidia as the big winner of Q3 2012, against both Intel and AMD. Intel's share of desktop and notebook sales both dropped roughly 8%, while AMD took a much smaller hit in desktops (2%) and a far greater hit in notebooks, sliding a whopping 17%. For Sunnyvale, the bad news doesn't stop there. JPR reports that quarter-on-quarter sales of desktop APUs fell 30%, notebook APUs slid 4.7%, and overall PC graphics shipments were down 10.7%. It's too early to tell if AMD's Trinity and Vishera launches have had much impact on the company's recent sales; both product families are in stock at NewEgg. The A10-5800K has hit... Read more...
Earlier today, Vijay Rakesh, an analyst with Sterne Agee, cut his rating on AMD to Neutral from Buy, based on suggestions that PC manufacturers were being generally cautious about sales over the next couple of quarters. Rakesh notes that Trinity is tracking far more design wins than Llano did at this point last year, but believes sales will slow ahead of the Windows 8 launch, writing that "OEMs cautious on back to school. We believe overall SepQ builds could be lighter than the seasonal 10-15% q/q, with a pickup late in the quarter for Win8." Digging into this a bit more, there's evidence of a bit of a battle between analysts as far as AMD is concerned. Cody Acree, of Williams Financial Group,... Read more...
Inside sources have leaked information to the press claiming that the CPU in the next-generation PS4 (codenamed Orbis) is an AMD Llano A8-3850. The chip will supposedly be paired with an AMD Radeon 7670 GPU with 1GB of integrated VRAM. With all due respect to IGN, this is the sort of report that deserves a considerably better review than they apparently gave it. Sony may well be working with that level of AMD hardware, but that's not the same as shipping said configurations. Let's start with the APU. The A8-3850 was one of AMD's earliest Llano chips; a 100W 2.9GHz quad-core with an integrated Radeon 6550D. It didn't ship in high quantity -- AMD chose to emphasize shipping out mobile Llano's rather... Read more...
A few of you might already be familiar with AMD's A4-3420 Accelerated Processing Unit (APU), a part that OEMs have had access to for several months now. According to reports, AMD plans to make the chip available to retail sometime in the second quarter, giving budget buyers another compelling low cost Llano chip to choose from. In case you need a refresher, or if this is the first you've heard of it, the A4-3420 is a socket FM1 processor like every other 32nm Fusion APU. It's a dual-core part clocked at 2.8GHz, has 1MB of cache (512KB per core), and is equipped with Radeon HD 6410 graphics clocked at 600MHz with 160 stream processors. Other features include an integrated memory controller supporting... Read more...
When AMD held its Analyst Day a few weeks ago, the company focused on how it was fundamentally changing its approach to semiconductor research and product development. Years of attempting to compete with Intel drained company coffers and exposed it to tremendous competitive pressure. Consumers unquestionably profited -- Intel's prices for various parts dropped dramatically in the early 2000s as AMD entered specific markets -- but Sunnyvale took a ferocious beating in the process. Forbes has published a major article on the company's turbulent last few years and current plans. It credits Dirk Meyer with saving the company after Hector Ruiz's tenure as CEO ended in mid-2009, but quotes no less... Read more...
AMD apparently isn't finished attaching its Athlon II moniker to Llano parts, as evidenced by a couple of new Athlon II X4 processors the chip maker quietly introduced this week. Specifically, AMD added the Athlon II X4 638 and 641 to its official product price list. Both of these are based on AMD's Llano architecture and ship without an integrated graphics core, but do slip into socket FM1 setups just like other Llano CPUs. The Athlon II X4 638 is a quad-chip with four processing threads clocked at 2.7GHz. It has 4MB of L2 cache, a TDP of 65W, and is priced at $81. Interestingly, the 641 is also priced at $81, but is 100MHz faster at 2.8GHz. It has a comparably high TDP at 100W, which is something... Read more...
AMD announced its fourth quarter and 2011 results yesterday. The figures aren't bad in and of themselves, but the company's overall position headed into 2012 is decidedly uncertain. Yearly revenue was flat at $6.57B, with total net income for fiscal 2011 at $495M, up four percent from 2010. "AMD shipped more than 30 million APUs in 2011, resulting in record annual notebook revenue," said Rory Read, AMD president and CEO. "The unmatched combination of computing and graphics capabilities in our low-power "Brazos" platform has made it our fastest ramping platform ever, paving the way for continued growth in key segments and geographies. Our server business has regained momentum, delivering two consecutive... Read more...
The original A-Series APU line-up didn’t feature any enthusiast-targeted products, but AMD quickly reacted to the A-Series’ mostly favorable reception with a new flagship, dubbed the A8-3870K Black Edition, which we’ll be showing you here today. In its default configuration, the A8-3870K is a slight upgrade from the A8-3850, thanks to a small increase in its default CPU frequency. The “K” in its part number, however, means the chip is unlocked, which makes for some interesting overclocking. When paired to the right motherboard, which features an updated BIOS / UEFI that fully supports the A8-3870K, this APU is able to hang with some of AMD’s fastest quad-core... Read more...
When AMD initially released their Llano-based A-Series APUs, the company targeted cost-conscious consumers looking for highly-integrated, easy to assemble solutions for an entry-level or mid-range PCs. At the time of launch, the flagship model in the A-Series line-up was the A8-3850, which featured quad CPU cores paired to a DirectX-11 Radeon GPU with 400 active shader units. In our coverage of the A8-3850, we found it to offer decent performance for its price, especially in graphics-related workloads where the APU’s relatively powerful integrated GPU was able to stretch its legs.  AMD Llano Die Shot... The original A-Series APU line-up didn’t feature any enthusiast-targeted... Read more...
There are different levels of overclocking. On the bottom end, a person might choose to crank things up a few MHz for a modest performance boost without really taxing their cooling setup or complimentary components. A few levels up you have the folks who invest in high end cooling and cherry components to handle aggressive OCs, and at the extreme end of the spectrum there are the ones who attempt suicide runs simply for the thrill, or to set world records, stability be damned. A Japanese overclocker employed by Overclock Works attempted the latter, taking an AMD A8-3870K Black Edition processor all the way to 5.87GHz. Source: Akiba PC Hotline That's almost twice the processor's stock speed, and... Read more...
Rumor has it that we'll see the first chips based on AMD's upcoming Trinity APU before too long, but the company isn't done with Llano quite yet. There's a fresh set of desktop and notebook chips based on the first-generation APU, though most of the changes are fairly minor. The big news in desktops is the introduction of new K-series parts that feature unlocked CPUs and GPUs for simultaneous and separate overclocking. We're unsure how much traction these parts are likely to gain, given that overclocking a mobile GPU isn't going to provide much of a performance boost. The new 3870K is a 3GHz CPU with a 100W TDP, no Turbo Core, and a 600MHz GPU. The new chip is a small step forward compared to... Read more...
As hard as it might be to believe, Apple came within inches of revamping its MacBook Air line with AMD's Llano platform. In fact, it was all set to go into production, but was abruptly cancelled last spring mainly because Apple lacked confidence in AMD's ability to supply enough parts. Intel, as it turns out, was Plan B. That's according to SemiAccurate, which claims to have heard from multiple sources that AMD was a frontrunner in the MacBook Air sweepstakes for quite some time. Apple was drawn to AMD's superior graphics technology, even at the expense of inferior CPU power, and had AMD been able to supply enough premium versions of Llano, it could have scored a major win. As SemiAccurate tells... Read more...
AMD's initial layoff announcement yesterday implied that the dismissals would occur across the company's global sales force. While that may still be true, it has become clear that AMD has slashed its PR and marketing departments in particular. The New Product Review Program* (NPRP) has lost most of its staff and Director of Product Planning, Carell Killebrew, who played an integral role in rescuing AMD's GPU division after the disaster of R600, also got the axe. Key members of the FirePro product team are also gone. None of the staff had any idea that the cuts were coming, or that they'd focus so particularly in certain areas. An email, purportedly from CEO Rory Read, sheds additional light on... Read more...
AMD's John Freuhe posted a blog entry yesterday detailing the company's first efforts to deploy Fusion-style APUs in a server environment. Penguin Computing has built and installed a cluster of 104 Infiniband-linked servers, each powered by a Llano A8-3850 processor. The company claims that the single-socket, 2U server offers unique advantages thanks to the Fusion architecture's onboard GPU. With the Altus 2A00, Penguin is the first to bring AMD’s unique APU capabilities to the HPC community,” says Phil Pokorny, CTO Penguin Computing. “We are extremely proud of our successful deployment of this platform on such a large scale. We believe that the high level of integration and... Read more...
This week has been a good news / bad news for Sunnyvale--but the bad, at least, was somewhat expected. The company gave notice today that its third quarter revenue would be lower than expected, with estimated quarterly income up 4-6 percent from Q2 levels. That's significantly less than AMD's original projection of ~10 percent, plus or minus two percentage points. The company's notice comes a month after rumors began that Bulldozer shipments might be delayed due to manufacturing problems. AMD announced it was shipping its server CPU, Interlagos, for revenue several weeks ago, but that announcement was originally expected in August. The company's news release states: The less-than-forecasted preliminary... Read more...
AMD and Intel are both preparing to launch new CPU architectures between now and the end of the year, but rumors have surfaced that suggest the two companies may delay their product introductions, albeit for different reasons. Taiwanese site DigiTimes refers to various unnamed "PC Players" who have apparently reported that Intel may push back the introduction of its Ivy Bridge processors from the end of 2011 to late Q1/early Q2 2012. Ivy Bridge is a 'tick' in Intel's tick/tock model; the 22nm die shrink of Sandy Bridge that's scheduled to incorporate an improved DX11-capable graphics core, support for PCI-Express 3.0, and will incorporate Intel's Tri-Gate 3D transistor technology. The article... Read more...
AMD has just announced availability of the new AMD A6-3500 APU for desktop systems, bolstering its current line-up of Llano-based Accelerated Processing Units with a more affordable model targeted at budget conscious, mainstream system builders. Unlike the first A8 and A6 APUs to hit the scene, which sport four execution cores, the new A6-3500 combines only three x86 CPU cores with 320 Radeon cores, and has a suggested retail price of $95.00. According to AMD, the A6-3500 APU will be available for purchase immediately through system builders and online retailers.     AMD Expands Brilliant HD APU Lineup with A6-3500 Desktop Processor – End users get multi-core CPU and... Read more...
Earlier this year, Intel unveiled its plan to redefine the concept of a PC around an ultra thin-and-light chassis reminiscent of the Macbook Air and with a standard CPU TDP of just 15W. OEM reactions to the CPU giant's attempt to reinvent the personal computer have been mixed. For all the platform's theoretical advantages, price has been a major concern; the Macbook Air's $999 base price is nearly double the average selling price of a PC laptop. Historically, PC buyers have balked at the high price tags attached to then-current thin-and-light notebooks--such products may have niche value, but the idea of launching mainstream products built around the concept has made more than a few companies... Read more...
A few weeks back, AMD officially launched their Llano-based A-Series Accelerated Processing Units, or APUs, in both desktop and mobile flavors. If you’re unfamiliar with Llano, it’s AMD’s mainstream, low-power APU that fuses four x86 cores with a DX11-class graphics processor on a single piece of silicon. The current flagship APU in the desktop line-up is the A8-3850, which hums along at 2.9GHz, with 400 active Radeon cores, that operate at 600MHz. The A6-3650 we’ll be showing you here is built using the same piece of silicon, but this lower-end A6-series part clocks in at 2.6GHz, with 320 active Radeon cores, running at 443MHz... AMD A6-3650 Llano APU Performance Review... Read more...
A few weeks back, AMD officially launched their Llano-based A-Series Accelerated Processing Units, or APUs, in both desktop and mobile flavors. At the time, we covered the high-end variants of both A-Series offerings; our coverage of the desktop version A8-3850 APU and its companion chipsets is posted here and the mobile A8-3500M is detailed here. If you’re unfamiliar with Llano, we suggest perusing those two articles as they go into much more detail than we will in this piece. We won’t rehash many of the architectural details, but just for a quick refresher, Llano is AMD’s mainstream, low-power APU that fuses four x86 cores with a DX11-class graphics processor... Read more...
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