Items tagged with lidar

Intel has announced what it says is the world's smallest high-resolution LiDAR depth camera. The device is called the Intel RealSense LiDAR Camera L515, and with it, the company is introducing a new type of solid-state LiDAR tech. The L515 uses LiDAR to scan a full scene allowing it to provide a point cloud with up to 23 million points of accurate depth data per second. The camera promises consistent high depth accuracy throughout the entire supported range of the camera starting at 25cm and going up to 9 meters. Intel says that the accuracy of the camera is less than 20mm Z error at maximum range. Intel fits L515 with an internal vision processor, motion blur artifact reduction, and short photon... Read more...
When I was younger—a lot younger—it seemed we were headed towards a future where flying cars would be the norm, a thought no doubt influenced by television (The Jetsons comes immediately to mind). That probably won't come to pass in my lifetime, though the widespread use of autonomous vehicles might. Several companies are invested in self-driving cars, including Apple, which not surprisingly is hoping to build the necessary technology in-house if a supplier doesn't step to the plate with an attractive offer. We've seen this play out with Apple in the mobile phone space, with the company designing its own custom Bionic processors for its iPhone family. Granted, those chips are based... Read more...
With vehicle makers focusing on making our future travel autonomous, a major concern arises: is it going to be safe and secure? If companies expect people to trust their lives with their technology, it goes without saying that it must be bullet-proof. There can be no compromises. Uber is a company that understands this very well, as it recently beefed-up its security brain-power by hiring two people who've proven that all of the technology lacing our vehicles could prove to be a serious detriment if it's insecure. It's a good thing that autonomous vehicles haven't littered the market quite yet, as it's clear that there is still much work to be done. Thanks to Jonathan Petit, Principal Scientist... Read more...