Items tagged with KIN

E-books have yet to be successful, and that, of course, has led to much skepticism over Amazon's Kindle.  Despite all that, it's already out of stock.The device, which the retailer started selling Monday for $399, quickly sold out, "due to heavy customer demand," according to Amazon. It will be in stock on December 7, and customers are instructed to order now "to reserve your place in line."Since the article was written, the date has been revised to Dec. 3rd.  One thing, though: we have no idea how many Kindles have actually been sold.... Read more...
We think it's a bit early to declare Amazon's new Star-Trek-esque reader as a flop just yet.  Sure it may not be the prettiest thing we've ever seen, and the price is a bit higher than what we were expecting, but all in all it could just be a glimpse of things yet to come.Not everybody shares our optimistic outlook on new hardware, especially Don Reisinger of CNet, who writes:“When bookstores are within driving distance and Amazon.com is a click away of most people, what's the impetus to use one of these?Everything I've heard from the proponents of this device attempt to glorify it as the "21st century's book." What a crock. E-book Readers provide few valuable experiences. And out of that... Read more...
Market share? Worldwide, the biggest -- and growing. Laptop sales growth? Explosive. Net income? A gusher. Revenue growth? Firehose style. The numbers for Hewlett-Packard's latest quarter are in. They're real, and they're spectacular. HP said Monday that sales of notebook computers grew nearly 50% compared to a year earlier. That helped push net income up 26%, beating Wall Street expectations. And HP was bullish about the future, predicting continued gains in sales."There's a tremendous opportunity out there and we like how we're positioned," said Chief Executive Mark Hurd in a conference call.The Palo Alto-based company said overall business grew fastest in emerging economies, such as Brazil,... Read more...
Usually the thought of reading an e-book brings to mind reading tiny, tiny print on a tiny, tiny screen.  Amazon.com today introduced the Kindle, which it hopes will assuage all those fears.E-books have pretty much flopped until now, but this morning Amazon.com introduced the Kindle, a device they hope does for e-books what the iPod did for MP3 players.The Kindle weighs about 10 oz. and can hold up to 200 titles. Size-wise it's 7.5" x 5.3" x 0.7" --- as you can see, smaller than a folded-up newspaper. Cost: not cheap, at $399, but despite the fact that it uses cellular technology (EVDO) to deliver the titles to you, there are no monthly or wireless fees.Here's the big issue for us: leaving... Read more...
Amazon is preparing to offer an e-book reader and associated download service on Monday of next week. There's already been several unsuccessful attempts to bring the printed word to portable electronic devices, without the eye-tiring backlit pixels you're looking at right now, for instance.  Unlike other devices, Amazon's "Kindle" reader is concentrating on the method of delivery of the content, not as much on the unit itself. That's a relief, as it explains why the pictures of the prototype Kindle reader I saw looked as elegant as a fax machine in 1988.The Kindle is equipped with a Wi-Fi connection that taps into an Amazon e-book store, which users can access to purchase new electronic... Read more...
The ongoing format war between Blu-Ray and HD DVD is continuing unabated and the battle has officially spilled over to the PC with the announcement of the $199 Phillips/Lite-On PLDS DH-4O1S internal drive.  The drive may or may not be a direct answer to recent HD players from the likes of Toshiba both for the set top and the PC.So what kind of a Blu-Ray player does $199 buy you?  Here's the answer:“Spec-wise, the drive reads either single- or dual-layer BD-R/RE/ROM discs at up to 4X speeds, while single- or double-layer DVD±R or DVD-ROM discs can be read at 12X and single or double-layer DVD±RW discs can be read at 8X speeds. DVD, Single-layer or Double-layer media at 4X maximum.... Read more...
It's a grand time to be in the GPU business. According to Jon Peddie Research, graphics chips manufacturers shipped 97.9 million units in the third quarter, a 20% rise over the preceding quarter, and 18% more than during the same period last year.  Intel is still king; AMD is the little engine that could; but it's Nvidia that's showing the biggest market-share rise.Overall, Intel held its lead, shipping 37.2 million units (+21.2% over Q3 2006) and claiming a 38.0% market share, which, however is down 3.8 points from 41.8% the company held in Q3 2006. AMD posted a slight shipment growth of 8.4% to 18.7 million units, translating into a 19.1% market share, down from 23.4% last year. ... Read more...
Chipmaker Intel is opening up a huge new factory in Arizona to make 45 nanometer scaled microprocessors. They're also upgrading their existing factory in New Mexico and building a new facility in Israel to change over from the soon-to-be-obsolete standard of 65 nanometers. The transistors on such chips are so small that more than 30 million can fit onto the head of a pin. How small they are is critical to the fight between Intel and AMD, because having more transistors on a single slice of silicon raises performance while lowering manufacturing costs. The new processors also are made with materials that reduce the amount of electric current escaping from transistors, a major problem as chip... Read more...
In recent months Comcast has been accused of blocking BitTorrent traffic on more than one occasion and the company has even gone so far as to cut customers off who use an 'excessive' amount of their 'unlimited' bandwidth.On one side of the recently drawn battle lines are the customers who are claiming that Comcast needs to spend more money on infastructure instead of taking such restrictive measures.  On the other side is, of course, Comcast who maintains that their TOS gives them discretion to cut off users whenever they feel like it.  Users have taken their war to local news agencies and forums while Comcast has issued statements through their PR department.“The original response,... Read more...
Hitachi makes personal computers? Well, they did; but now they don't. Hitachi announced today they are ceasing manufacturing of most kinds of personal computers.  Hitachi is already outsourcing the production of their business computers to Hewlett-Packard, and will continue to sell them under the Hitachi nameplate."We will not develop normal, consumer-use personal computers and will focus our resources on new products, namely televisions with PC functions or PCs that can show television programs," he said. Hitachi will maintain production of special business-use computers, such as ones without hard disks, the spokesman said, without elaborating further. Hitachi, which helped pioneer PC development... Read more...
Why would Silicon Valley, which birthed the idea of the cubicle, be moving away from it?  Even Intel, which is often credited with the idea, is rethinking it.Cubicles can prompt odd behavior, people who have studied them said. It is hard to see if colleagues are busy, so some cube-dwellers will send emails to a neighbor about a simple question that could have been answered more easily in a conversation. Some technology companies never adopted cubes. Microsoft Corp., for example, promotes quiet and concentration by giving most workers offices with doors. That is costly. Chris Hood, a manager in what H-P calls its Workplace program, said contact and collaboration boost productivity for many... Read more...
Microsoft and Toshiba today announced the formation of a consortium to hype advanced HD DVD interactive technology.  They mentioned "interactivity and interoperability" and  said they'd "maximize consumer satisfaction," among other things. Long story short: They want to sell you things while you're watching movies. Major Hollywood studios such as Paramount Pictures, Universal Studios and Warner Bros. as well as DreamWorks Animation SKG will join the consortium, which will be established by the end of the year, a Toshiba spokeswoman told Dow Jones Newswires. Technology that will be introduced, for instance, will enable users watching HD DVD movies to purchase goods used by the actors... Read more...
Is Microsoft bored with making office software and operating systems? Seems that way. In May of 2007, it purchased online marketing firm aQuantive for $6 billion. Speaking at a media event in Paris yesterday, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer outlined a future for the company over the next decade to realize 25 percent of their revenues from online and in-game advertising. Microsoft, the media company? That's right. As growth slows in Microsoft's core operating systems and desktop applications businesses—and as the threat grows from free software and applications offered over the Internet by the likes of Google -the software giant is scrambling for new sources of revenue and growth. Microsoft aims to... Read more...
The newspapers are full, every day, of reports of borderline crazy people suing  anybody they can think of for bizarre reasons. Every once in a while, you read  about one, and think: This is just crazy enough to work. How about suing the entire pay TV industry because you are required to pay for channels you don't want or  you can't purchase the service? "The antitrust laws protect the right of choice," antitrust lawyer Maxwell M. Blecher said. "Here the customer is denied that choice." The complex web of contractual arrangements among service providers and networks amounts to a monopoly or cartel that has "deprived consumers of choice, caused them to pay inflated... Read more...
The recent news that Ameritrade had been leaking sensitive customer data was enough to drive some investors away from Ameritrade for the time being, and possibly forever.  If you're an investor who is on the fence deciding when you might put your faith and financial security into Ameritrade's hands again, then you might want to know that Ameritrade was aware of some of their security breaches for over a year.The breach was so serious that Ameritrade found 'unauthorized code' in their systems, and have yet to be able to fully account for how it got there.  The breaches allowed for about 6 million customer records to be compromised, but the limits of what data was stolen hasn't been completely... Read more...
Just two short weeks after Apple refreshed their iPod offerings and released a totally new model, it seems that Apple is modifying the iTunes database to make sure that users don't try to use their products with a competitive software package/service.The modification more or less prevents using an 'updated' iPod with another program that would alter the playlist in any way, either deleting, adding, or possibly even changing the songs in any way (such as the bit-rate, order, etc.).  If the iPod isn't exactly as iTunes remembered it, the iPod will inconveniently 'forget' all your songs:“The most plausible reason for locking then new iPods to iTunes is that Apple is becoming conscious of the growing... Read more...
It looks like the days (literally, just days) of having to pay almost $100 for an iPhone unlocking program are over...more or less.  We don't recommend or suggest that you try any hack due to the possibility of damaging your product and, according to some reports, the risk of bodily harm.  That said, it is certainly understandable why some people might want to give the iPhone a try.  For those intrepid souls, please read on:“Our friends at TUAW pointed out that the iPhone Dev Team has struck gold for everyone who wants an iPhone but not an AT&T contract. Yes, that's right: the team has released anySIM, a free, completely GUI app for unlocking your iPhone. As of this writing, you can download... Read more...
We're in the early stages of a major transition in the PC arena, much like in 2004 when Intel launched their first core logic chipset with support for DDR2 memory.  This time around, however, Intel is pushing DDR3 memory with their current crop of desktop chipsets. When DDR2 memory first hit the scene, we recommended users to tread lightly as the technology needed some time to mature.  Back then DDR2 had much higher latency than standard DDR memory and it couldn't scale to high enough clock speeds to negate its latency disadvantages.  And in many situations DDR2 memory actually performed below the bar set by standard DDR, not to mention it was much more expensive.  In time though, DDR2... Read more...
Software unlocking of the iPhone has been a source of threats from AT&T.  However, there is an exemption in the DMCA that allows software unlocking of phones - the question has been what will happen if that's tested against a commercial product.  In this case, an open source, free product, there's no recourse, except for a ROM change that stops this, of course.The first, non-GUI version was released last night; a beta GUI version has been released. If you want to try the manual version, that’s linked at the same site. Kudos to the iPhone Dev Team and all involved on this. This was (and still is) a lot of work.How soon will the 1.03 version of iPhone software be released, hmm?... Read more...
Despite the recent defection of NBC Universal, which may in fact been as a result of negotiations including this option, Apple is trying to lower the price of video downloads on iTunes.  Their proposed new price would be 99 cents / TV episode. There are reasons for the network's unease. For example, DVD sales of television shows have become an important part of overall revenue. Variety offered one example where NBC's Heroes DVD currently retails for $40 in stores. Including 23 episodes, on iTunes it would currently cost $45.77 to purchase all of them. After the change, that cost would be $22.77, much cheaper than the DVD. Customers could opt for the cheaper download... Read more...
You may recall that the UniquePhones software unlocking solution has been delayed by a threat by AT&T. Meanwhile, iPhoneSIMFree has been pretty quiet. Yesterday, however, they released a FAQ which not only gives additional information about their unlocking solution, but also gives hope for a release — soon. 1. Would all the same features still work? Yes. Except for Visual Voice mail (which is an exclusive AT&T feature), all features currently available on locked phones will be available on unlocked phones. * 2. Is it resistant to updates? While we have taken all possible measures to ensure that the phone will remain unlocked, we can only guarantee... Read more...
Citing a post from Hackintosh, the iPhone Atlas is starting to uncover the dark side of iPhone unlocking, namely the allegedly explosive nature of some of the devices.Here's an tidbit from the original post, spelling errors and all: “We were so happy, all the software part was done, so we started opening the iphone. The antenna cover was a bit tricky but eventually it came off. Then we started to open the metal cover (after taking out the 3 screws) and PUFF, up it went in smoke, I think my collegue must have touched something. It literally went up in black smoke. I was so hot that when I tried to pick it up I burnt my fingers. So, this is for sure the most difficult part of the whole process.... Read more...
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