Items tagged with directx raytracing

Beginning tomorrow, DICE will launch a major update for Battlefield V entitled Tides of War Chapter 1: Overture. That name is quite a mouthful, but the update/patch brings with it a number of new features and even performance updates. As for actual gameplay, there are new multiplayer maps and changes to the core mechanics of the game. There's even a new single-player experience in the form of "The Last Tiger" War Story. This campaign will let you crew a Tiger I tank along enemy lines. You can also partake in action on the new Panzerstorm map (set in the Belgium countryside) during multiplayer outings. Other new features include a Practice Range for getting a handle on all the weapons included... Read more...
UL Benchmarks' 3DMark is adding real-time ray tracing support to its suite of benchmarks thanks to support for the DirectX Raytracing API. The new test is called 3DMark Port Royal and will support any graphics card that is compatible with DirectX Raytracing. UL Benchmarks says that it worked with some of the top tech titans in the gaming industry including Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA to make sure that the benchmark is representative of the performance that we can expect from current- and next-generation hardware. Right now, the only graphics cards that support DirectX Raytracing without being hit with a severe performance penalty is NVIDIA's GeForce RTX family. Currently, the GeForce RTX... Read more...
Futuremark, the company behind the popular 3DMark and PCMark benchmarks that are widely used by reviewers (us included) and enthusiasts alike, has a released technology demo showcasing real-time raytracing effects. The demo is built around Microsoft's new DirectX Raytracing (DXR) API, which allows any graphics card supporting DirectX 12 to leverage raytracing techniques to "naturally and efficiently" fill in the gaps left by rasterization. Raytracing might very well be the future of graphics rendering in everyday applications, and in particular games, eventually replacing rasterization techniques completely. For that day to come, there needs to be significant advancements in hardware, as the... Read more...
Microsoft says that 3D gaming today is a lie. While the techniques game designers use can make games on your screen look like they're 3D, the rasterization process used ultimately only operates in two dimensions with 3D primitives mapped onto it via transformation matrices. Things are changing with the introduction today of a DirectX 12 technique that aims to bridge the gap between rasterization techniques used today and the full 3D effects of tomorrow. The new feature that will do this is called DirectX Raytracing (DXR). DXR allows current techniques like screen-space reflections (SSR) to "naturally and efficiently" fill gaps left by rasterization. Microsoft says that DXR adds four new... Read more...