Items tagged with bics

Toshiba announced its next-generation BG4 solid state drive all the way back at CES in early January of this year. The diminutive, little Toshiba BG4 isn’t about the latest and greatest in bleeding-edge SSD storage performance or pushing the envelope in terms of throughput. However, it does still represent a significant step forward in regard to power and performance in the smallest of form factors – you’ll see exactly what we mean in a couple of the photos below. The 1TB Toshiba BG4 we will be showing you here is essentially a single-chip solution, cable of multi-gigabyte per second sequential transfers. It’s exactly the kind of device OEMs and ODMs look for when designing... Read more...
Toshiba today rolled out its latest family of NVMe SSDs that will be used by OEMs later this year. The new BG4, as its name implies, is a 4th generation, single-chip ball grid array (BGA) SSD that brings some pretty impressive performance gains over its BG3 predecessor. For starters, the BG4 uses 96-layer 3D BiCS TLC NAND instead of 64-layers, which not only bolsters overall capacities, but also keeps power consumption in check (Toshiba says that overall power consumption has been reduced by 20 percent). And whereas the BG3 uses an NVMe PCIe 3.0 x2 interface, the BG4 instead uses an NVMe PCIe 3.0x4 interface for increased throughput.   So, what does this mean for shipping parts?... Read more...
Toshiba has released a string of top-notch, affordable NVMe solid state drives over the last couple of years featuring its BiCS flash memory technology, which target a wide array of market segments. We’ve shown you a few recently, like the diminutive, affordable OCZ RC100 and the mainstream OEM targeted, XG5. Today, Toshiba is redoubling its efforts in the OEM segment with yet another new client NVMe drive, the XG6. We first posted news of the XG6 a few weeks back – if you’d like to check out the initial announcement, it is available right here. Like the XG5, this new drive is optimized for consumer desktop and mobile computing applications and it features Toshiba’s... Read more...
Toshiba has uncloaked its new XG6 Client NVMe SSDs that are targeted at OEM customers and will be installed in PCs that you’ll be able to purchase from a variety of manufacturers.  The XG6 serves a successor to the existing XG5 family, but will sit alongside the XG5-P, which is offered in higher capacities. What makes the XG6 so interesting is that it is the world’s first SSD to use 96-layer BiCS 3D NAND flash memory. Compared to its 64-layer predecessors, the new 96-layer tech allows Toshiba to increase capacity per unit chip size by 40 percent. In addition, power consumption of 4.7 watts or less put the SSDs more on par with far slower SATA SSDs currently on market.... Read more...
Toshiba has announced an array of products featuring various flavors of its 64-layer BiCS 3D Flash memory. We previously took a look at the speedy Toshiba XG5 NVMe M.2 SSD, and found it to be a capable performer. Today, however, Toshiba takes its 64-layer BiCS 3D Flash technology in another direction with the brand-new TR200 series SATA solid state drives we’ll be showing you here. The Toshiba TR200 series SSDs are built around 64-Layer 3-bit-per-cell TLC (triple-level cell) BiCS Flash, but use the legacy SATA interface and target budget-conscious do-it-yourselfers. Toshiba’s BiCS Flash memory employs a three-dimensional (3D) stacked cell structure that is designed for high density applications,... Read more...
At Dell EMC World a few weeks back, we gave you a glimpse of an unnamed Toshiba NVMe SSD that featured 64-layer BiCS 3D flash memory. We couldn’t reveal much about the drive back then, but Toshiba eventually lifted the veil, and revealed a new family of drives dubbed the XG5. The Toshiba XG5 is the follow-up to the successful XG3, and is designed to offer a combination of high performance and high density, at what should be competitive price points. If you're unfamiliar with the technology, Toshiba’s BiCS flash memory employs a three-dimensional (3D) stacked cell structure that is designed for high density applications, but it also offers higher endurance than typical 3D NAND flash memory.... Read more...
We gave you a glimpse of an unnamed Toshiba NVMe SSD at Dell EMC World a few weeks back, featuring 64-layer BiCS 3D flash memory. We couldn’t reveal much about the drive then, but Toshiba is lifting the veil on it today, and is announcing a new family of drives dubbed the XG5, which offer a combination of high performance and high density, at what should be competitive price points.Toshiba’s BiCS flash memory employs a three-dimensional (3D) stacked cell structure that is designed for high density applications, but the technology also offers higher endurance than typical 3D NAND flash memory. Because triple pages can be programmed simultaneously, BiCS 3D flash memory is capable of higher performance... Read more...
We first learned about Toshiba’s “world’s first” 64-layer, 512Gb BiCS flash NAND back in early February. Later that month, Toshiba began shipping samples of the NAND, promising that it would help enable high-performing and more cost-effective 1TB solutions in a single package. This week, Toshiba is showcasing its 64-layer BiCS flash live at the Dell EMC World conference being held in Las Vegas. On hand was a prototype XG-series NVMe PCIe SSD equipped with 1TB of BiCS 3D TLC NAND. Naturally, the prototype SSD was housed within a Dell XPS laptop, which is appropriate given the setting. Unfortunately, although we got “eyes on” the demo, we weren’t able to see any performance benchmarks due to this... Read more...
Toshiba and SanDisk announced the joint development of what they claim is the world's first 48-layer three dimensional stacked cell structure flash memory, otherwise known as BiCS (Bit Cost Scalable), a 2-bit-per-cell 128-gigabit (16 gigabytes) device. Put another way, BiCS is essentially Toshiba's version of the 3D NAND flash memory that's shipping with newer Samsung solid state drives (SSDs). The appeal of a 3D stacked cell structure is that it negates the need to continually shrink the size of NAND flash memory cells by using thinner process technologies and the technological hurdles that go along with it. Instead, stacking the cells allows for greater density and reduces costs, all while... Read more...