PC Components, Peripherals And Gadget Reviews And News

Dig into our deep-dive product reviews and news of PC components from processors, to motherboards, graphics cards (GPUs), sound cards, and storage, along with other gadgets and peripherals that complete the computing experience. Whether you're a DIY PC enthusiast builder or just looking to read-up on what should be inside or connected to your next pre-built PC, here's where you'll find all the nuts and bolts sorted on what makes modern computer systems tick, as well some of the best user interface devices to go with them.

Although rumors had been circulating for a while, NVIDIA went ahead and made the GeForce GTX 1050 and GeForce GTX 1050 Ti official last week with an announcement featuring a number of details about the cards. In the announcement, NVIDIA covered some of the speeds and feeds, revealed a number of partner board designs, and revealed expected pricing. Performance, however, was not discussed. Today we’re able to tell all, with a trio of GeForce GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti cards from MSI and EVGA. We’ve got two cards from MSI – in both plain vanilla and Ti flavors – along with an EVGA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti SuperClocked Edition. Before we dive in, here are the GPUs’ reference specifications, as outlined... Read more...
NVIDIA's new Pascal GPU architecture has been taking the PC graphics market by storm since its introduction in early May. The leading-edge semiconductor powerhouse, in addition to lighting up pixels, has been burning up its balance sheets as well, with strong sales of GeForce, Quadro and Tesla product lines driving record revenues and a brisk uptick in the company stock price. For NVIDIA's core gamer customer base, the GeForce GTX 1080 and 1070 kicked-off the Pascal party, followed by the introduction of the more mid-range GeForce GTX 1060, and then finally the monstrous NVIDIA Titan X. With the exception of the entry-level graphics segment (a slot in the product stack the company has yet to... Read more...
NVIDIA dropped a bomb a couple of weeks back and shocked almost everyone in the enthusiast community with the surprise announcement of the new, Pascal-based TITAN X. If you missed our original coverage, the story went something like this: NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang lost a bet, and out of the blue went and gave away a few TITAN X cards at a special AI event that was taking place at Stanford University. That may sound a little far-fetched, but the way this launch shook out, it seems somewhat plausible. Regardless, as soon as the announcement was posted, we’re sure many of you had two questions in mind – how fast is it? And what’s the deal with the GP102? Thankfully, we can answer both of those questions... Read more...
NVIDIA has historically taken a somewhat different approach when announcing its newest Titan-branded graphics cards, that differs from the measured, methodical launches of its more mainstream consumer products. Tonight’s announcement, however, takes the cake. We just received details from NVIDIA regarding an upcoming ultra-powerful, Pascal-based Titan X, featuring a 12 billion transistor GPU, codenamed GP102. The email’s subject began with “SURPRISE” and the body started with, “It began with a bet”. NVIDIA Ceo Jen-Hsun Huang With Pascal-Powered GeForce GTX Titan X NVIDIA is obviously having a little fun with this one. At an artificial intelligence meet-up at Stanford University this evening,... Read more...
Doing virtually reality (VR) well is very hard. It requires significant compute resources to render immersive VR worlds with the kind of fidelity, latency, and framerates necessary for users to feel truly connected. Whereas a typical PC game may feel smooth and immersive at a paltry 1080p resolution at 30 or 60 frames per second, VR headsets like the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift have displays with a 2160 x 1200 combined resolution and 90 Hz refresh rate, and ideally, the systems they're connected to need to sustain framerates of 90 frames per second. As VR continues to evolve, and resolutions and fidelity improve, the amount of compute resources required to render those frames fast enough increases... Read more...
A couple of weeks back, just in time to rain on AMD’s Radeon RX 480 parade, NVIDIA revealed a few details about the GeForce GTX 1060. We didn’t have actual performance numbers to share, but NVIDIA revealed GTX 1060 Founder’s Edition’s pricing, core count, clocks, memory configuration, TDP, and physical characteristics. They also claimed the card would offer performance in the same class as the GeForce GTX 980. Considering the fact that the GP106 GPU at the heart of the GeForce GTX 1060 has roughly half of the resources of NVIDIA’s current flagship GeForce GTX 1080, and NVIDIA put the 1080 up against a pair of GTX 980s in SLI at its launch event, claiming the GTX 1060 would perform on par with... Read more...
For many users, one monitor just isn’t enough. Sometimes, two displays won’t cut it either. If your latest project has you searching for multiple, high-end monitors, you’re likely going to be looking at professional workhorses like NEC’s MultiSync EA305WMi. The venerable display maker designed this 30-inch monitor specifically for multi-monitor configurations and added something it calls ControlSync technology, so you can manage multiple displays from a single interface. The MultiSync EA305WMi is a 30-inch (29.8-inch viewable area) monitor with a 2560x1600 resolution in a 16:10 aspect ratio. Although displays with 3840x2160 UHD resolution have been hogging the spotlight recently, 2560x1600 still... Read more...
The powerful GeForce GTX 1080 got the lion’s share of media attention immediately following NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang’s official unveiling at an event in Austin, Texas a couple of weeks back. But its little brother, the GeForce GTX 1070, was also mentioned along with its expected price point, which just happened to be far more attainable for most PC enthusiasts. Better yet, the GeForce GTX 1070 would reportedly offer “Titan X class performance”, which is particularly impressive, given the 1070’s sub-$400 asking price of partner-built boards. Like the 1080, the GTX 1070 Founder's Edition is a bit pricier.The GeForce GTX 1070’s official reference specifications were revealed a few days... Read more...
A couple of weeks back, at a packed event in Austin, Texas filled with tech press and attendees from the DreamHack gaming event that took place up the road, NVIDIA CEO Jen Hsun-Huang unveiled the company’s newest graphics cards, the GeForce GTX 1080 and GeForce GTX 1070. These latest flagships represent a true generational leap in performance and efficiency, thanks to NVIDIA's new Pascal GPU architecture at their core and the bleeding-edge 16nm FinFET + VLSI manufacturing processes used to produce the chips. For the last few years, virtually all of the discrete GPUs being produced used a 28nm process. Mr. Huang made some lofty claims in regards to the GeForce GTX 1080’s efficiency and... Read more...
A few weeks back, during its GPU Technology Conference, NVIDIA announced a new Quadro-branded graphics card for the professional workstation market. That card is the Quadro M2000 we’ll be showing you here today. The Quadro M2000 is a low-power pro graphics solution featuring a GPU based on NVIDIA’s Maxwell architecture. In fact, it’s the very same GPU used on one of the more mainstream GeForce GTX-branded cards. However, with the Quadro M2000, additional features and capabilities are enabled through NVIDIA's Quadro software/driver suite and the card’s particular hardware configuration.The Quadro M2000’s main features and specifications are listed in the table below. We’ll follow those up with... Read more...
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 - Faster Than Titan X For Half The Cost, Faster Than 2x GTX 980 Tonight at an event in Austin, Texas, NVIDIA unveiled its highly anticipated next-generation, Pascal-based GeForce graphics cards, known as the GeForce GTX 1080 and GeForce GTX 1070. NVIDIA’s Pascal architecture is based on 16nm FinFET technology, similar to that of NVIDIA’s high end data center Tesla P100 processing engine, but the GeForce cards are targeted at the consumer gaming market. NVIDIA’s GP104 GPU at the heart of the new GeForce cards is comprised of some 8 billion transistors and features a 256-bit memory interface and 8GB of Micron GDDR5X graphics memory -- commonly referred to as G5X --... Read more...
At last week’s GPU Technology Conference, NVIDIA’s CEO Jen-Hsun Huang unveiled a couple of key products and technologies that target the High-Performance Computing, or HPC, space, including the Tesla P100 data center accelerator and its companion DGX-1 deep-learning system, which is a powerful server that has up to eight Tesla P100 cards at its core. Today though, we have more information about the underlying architecture employed in the P100, otherwise known NVIDIA’s Pascal GPU architecture.Pascal is the follow-up to the Maxwell architecture, which is leveraged in NVIDIA’s current-generation of graphics cards and mobile GPUs. And the Pascal-based GPU at the heart of the Tesla P100 is codenamed... Read more...
Yesterday, during his keynote address at GTC 2016, NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang made a number of interesting announcements and disclosures. We saw Apple co-founder Steve “Woz” Wozniak take a virtual tour of Mars and witnessed the official unveiling of NVIDIA’s Tesla P100, which is based on the company’s bleeding-edge, GP100 GPU. GP100 leverages NVIDIA’s forward-looking Pascal GPU architecture and features 16GB of HBM2 memory, all built using TSMC’s 16nm FinFET manufacturing process. The GP100 is massive with a 600mm2 die, which is about the size of current gen high-end Maxwell GPUs, though when you consider it's built on 16nm process technology, it's obvious Tesla's compute resources are massive,... Read more...
Although the names, or more specifically the acronyms, for some of the new technologies NVIDIA is unveiling today leaked out recently, details on what they offered gamers and how they worked were scarce. At the Game Developers Conference currently underway in San Francisco, however, NVIDIA officially took the wraps of some new graphics techniques for shadows and lighting – dubbed Hybrid Frustum Traced Shadows (HFTS), NVIDIA Volumetric Lighting, and Voxel Accelerated Ambient Occlusion (VXAO) – which can drastically improve in-game image quality. And the features are already being leverages in a trio of popular games, thanks to some recent updates and patches.NVIDIA PhysX-GRB In The GameWorks 3.1... Read more...
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