Items tagged with Yi

What do an American PC maker and a Chinese search engine have in common? They both want to take a piece of the mobile pie away from their competitors in China. Dell and Baidu are planning to work together to develop smartphones and tablets, presumably to break into the vast Chinese mobile market. We already know that Dell has been knocking on China’s door in the mobile space, and joining up with an established, dominant online Chinese entity such as Baidu makes sense and could help it snag some market share from the likes of Apple and Alibaba. Baidu, for its part, is clearly headed toward expanding into the mobile market. The company is developing Android-based mobile platform Yi, which... Read more...
Don't get TOO excited yet.  The Inquirer spills a lot of rumors, and its credibility is somewhat less because of that.  That said, it's not always wrong, and there are some valid reasons why Google might be interested in Valve.  Although, you'd think with Android about to launch and Chrome just launched, they might be a little busy. Still, as The Inq says:Well placed sources tell us that Google is going to be buying Valve any second now. So why would Google, emperor of all things Web-based, want a gaming company?  Possibly it's that logo above: Steam.  Steam is Valve's highly-successful digital distribution system  It's so successful Valve even has other publishers... Read more...
Ken Brill at Forbes does a little arithmetic to examine the true cost of running a server, and the numbers are a bit of a surprise. Since we're in the midst of something of a boom in data center construction, shouldn't someone be figuring out what they really cost before they buy a bunch of servers and roll out the plans? Because of the weird way accounting departments compartmentalize costs, server farms might seem awfully cheap. Until you plug it all in, of course.Data-center building depreciation is often carried separately from data-center mechanical and electrical equipment. Utility bills often go to a centralized energy function. Site operation costs for technicians, security staff, power... Read more...
The latest events in the Megan Meier MySpace suicide case took place Monday, when Missouri governor Matt Blunt signed into law a bill which revised the the state's already existing harassment law to include telephone and electronic communication.Those under 21 would face only a misdemeanor, but for adults, this is a felony, with a sentence of up to four years in prison.The Megan Meier case caught the attention of the nation when it brok. A teenage girl committed suicide after a MySpace romance went bad. The romance itself and the boy involved were in fact fictional, perpetrated as a vindictive prank by the mother of a former friend who lived down the street.The suicide occurred in October of... Read more...
Google has been ordered to turn over their logs of user activity on their YouTube site to Viacom. Viacom is suing Google over copyright infringement, and wishes to see how many YouTube users actually look at Viacom copyrighted material on the video service, then compare it to the amount of traffic any given non-copyrighted video might garner, in order to prove that Google is making money off Viacom's Intellectual Property, and assess potential damages. As you might expect, privacy mavens are up in arms over a judge ordering that usernames, IP addresses and logs of videos viewed for everyone who's ever logged onto YouTube. When it initiated legal action in March 2007 the firm {Viacom]said it had... Read more...
An interesting tale from a reliable source has just tipped up regarding buying bargain iPods online: “The iPod came in just a couple of days--but as soon as I unwrapped it and connected it to my Mac at home I got an ominous alert from my usually quiet antivirus software.  The iPod, it informed me, contained some virus known as AdobeR.exe. As I dug into the problem, I learned something I probably should have realized before I ordered.  The ‘recertified’ iPod wasn't recertified by Apple, but instead through some third party.” The moral of the story is that if you’re going to buy a recertified part, get it directly from the manufacturer.  A virus on the device could end up being the... Read more...
As if on cue after HotHardware's News Item about the future of solid state memory, USA Today has a article today about the plentiful supply of flash memory chips, and how that oversupply is putting downward pressure on prices. Some are even being sold at a loss to shed supply. Memory bargain hunters, start your engines.Some wholesale flash prices tumbled 22% in the first quarter from the previous quarter, Semico Research says.That's bad news for companies that manufacture flash, including Samsung, Toshiba and Hynix (formerly a division of Hyundai). But it lowers the cost of making everything from universal serial bus (USB) drives to navigation systems to cellphones.Savings are being passed on... Read more...
Fortunately Amazon.com launched this service on 4/2, or we might have wondered ...In less than a minute and using only text messages, Amazon.com customers can find the product they are looking for and complete a purchase using TextBuyIt. Simply send a text message to "AMAZON" (262966) with the name of the product, search term or a UPC or ISBN code, and, within seconds, Amazon replies with the product or products that match the search, along with prices. To buy an item, customers simply reply to the text message by entering the unique single digit number next to the item they want. Customers will then receive a short phone call from Amazon with the final details of their order and asking them... Read more...
We do?  And we always thought it was all about winning - which usually means not dying.I can't even count the number of ways I've died. Like most gamers, I've been slaughtered by AK-47-wielding terrorists, poisoned by eldritch spiders and blown up with alien frag grenades. I've also been impaled on medieval swords, ripped limb from limb by dinosaurs and impassively stomped by 20-story-tall, walking war machines that barely noticed my existence.Yet here's the thing: It's possible that these deaths have been among my most enjoyable game experiences.This is the fascinating argument of a new paper by Niklas Ravaja, a scientist who has done pioneering research into the emotions of gamers as they... Read more...
Two Detroit pension funds are upset with Yahoo's recent rejection to Microsoft's buyout offer.  They have filed a law suit over their grievance:"According to the lawsuit, Yahoo's board is pursuing "value-destructive" third-party deals in an effort to fight off Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft, which on Feb. 1 announced a takeover bid of $31 per share in cash and stock, a 62 percent premium over Yahoo's previous day's closing price."Given that Yahoo and Microsoft are both major players in the industry, we can't help but wonder what an acquisition would due to portfolios that included both stocks.... Read more...
As we've mentioned here before, Yahoo has become a huge audience without a show. Now Microsoft, who have tried for years to leverage their success selling proprietary software into some sort of presence on the Internet, has decided to get that presence the old fashioned way: They're going to buy it.Microsoft Corp. today announced that it has made a proposal to the Yahoo! Inc. Board of Directors to acquire all the outstanding shares of Yahoo! common stock for per share consideration of $31 representing a total equity value of approximately $44.6 billion. Microsoft’s proposal would allow the Yahoo! shareholders to elect to receive cash or a fixed number of shares of Microsoft common stock, with... Read more...
If you've been stashing extra lithium batteries in your luggage when flying, the Transportation Department would like a word with you.  Wary of short circuits that could cause a fire, they're limiting the amount you can transport, and specifying the type of packaging required for the little lithium friends you carry to keep your electronic devices ready for action.The ban affects shipments of non-rechargeable lithium batteries, such as those made by Energizer Holdings Inc. and Procter & Gamble Co.'s Duracell brand."Doing something as simple as keeping a spare battery in its original retail packaging or a plastic zip-lock bag will prevent unintentional short-circuiting and fires," Krista... Read more...
Facebook has gotten all the bad publicity anybody could ever want over their intrusive "Beacon"  marketing/advertising/information gathering widget. On top of everything else, researchers have discovered that despite Facebook's modification of their permission settings, Facebook is still collecting information about all your  purchases at retailers participating in the program, even if you are not logged on to Facebook. "When a Facebook user takes a Beacon-enabled action on a participating site, information is sent to Facebook in order for Facebook to operate Beacon technologically. If a Facebook user clicks "No, thanks" on the partner site notification, Facebook does not use the data... Read more...
It's no secret (at least, by now it'd better not be!) that the iPhone doesn't have a user-replaceable battery.  In fact, lawsuits have been filed over it.  But the firm Exradia thinks not only was this an oversight, it is a health risk.Exradia has launched a range of replacement batteries for popular models of mobile phones which incorporate its special magic circuit to interfere with the bad RF coming from your handset, but iPhone users, with their non-replaceable battery, will just have to suffer.According to the release Exradia are "...surprised Apple has chosen to ignore this potential health issue", though the company admits there's no evidence that mobile phones cause problems... Read more...
SpiralFrog, a free online music download service, launches today. The service hopes to make a go of it with the holy grail of RIAA haters -- ad-supported free music downloads. Founder Joe Mohen predicts they'll need 10 million users per month to make enough money to pay the licensing fees on the music. Is it really that hard to give away free stuff? "Registration is fairly quick, requiring a name, age, gender and ZIP code. Mac users can't use the service at all; Firefox users will probably need to install a Windows Media Player plug-in that requires all other browser windows to be closed (ugh). The site also requires Flash 9 and SpiralFrog's download manager, which allows a Download... Read more...
Today Comcast today responded to reports by the blog Torrentfreak, which we posted a few days ago.   In that article, it was reported that users were experiencing slowdowns and even dropped transfers, and that Comcast was the culprit. Over the past few days, these claims have been widely circulated throughout the Web. But when I spoke to Comcast spokesman Charlie Douglas earlier today, he flat-out denied that the company was filtering or "shaping" any traffic on its network. He said the company doesn't actively look at the applications or content that its customers download over the network. But Comcast does reserve the right to cut off service to customers who abuse the network by using... Read more...
The sheer number of recalls for Chinese toys has placed a burden not just on retailers and toy companies, but on consumers as well. Parents have quite a long list to go over if they want to be sure the toys they have purchased for their children are safe.  But online toy companies are making things easier on parents. Online stores -- like eToys.com, Amazon.com and Walmart.com -- are taking the sting out of the recent run of recalls by sending e-mail notices to customers who bought an affected item on their sites. The notices point out exactly what the product is, when it was purchased and offer detailed online information about the recall and what a consumer should do with... Read more...
Former professor of engineering at the University of California, Davis Paul S. Moller has always dreamed of developing a flying car. In the 1970s, he established Supertrapp Industries, a company that specializes in a device that muffles engine noise. He sold the company in the 1980s so that he could pursue his dreams, and since then has established Moller International. Moller's latest project: the M200G “UFO-looking saucer-shaped” flying car that looks like something out of a science fiction movie. The M200G, aka Moller Volantor, is designed to be a “vertical take-off and landing vehicle.” It is already under production and is estimated at a price of $90,000 USD. “The M200G uses eight low-emission... Read more...
Windows Vista brought users a new security feature called User Account Control, or UAC for short.  Some like it, some find it to be annoying, and Apple even made a humorous commercial that made fun of UAC.  Of course you can just turn UAC off, and some do, but that may or may not be the optimal solution.  After all, UAC is designed to be helpful, but not everyone wants to see it so often.  Here's a solution you can try, but please make sure your system is well protected before following these steps: "Click Start and Control Panel. Switch to Classic View (if you haven't already) and click on the Administration Tools icon. In the list that opens click on Local Security Policy, and in the next... Read more...
Apparently, a new licensing agreement is being finalized that could make it legal for consumers who have already purchased a HD DVD or Blu-Ray disc to make a bakcup copy... "Under a licensing agreement in its final stages, consumers may get the right to make several legal copies of HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc movies they’ve purchased, a concession by the movie industry that may quell criticism that DRM (digital rights management) technologies are too restrictive. The agreement, if supported by movie studios and film companies, could allow a consumer to make a backup copy in case their original disc is damaged and another copy for their home media server, said Michael Ayers, a representative of... Read more...
The need for IT workers with very specific skills is driving up the wages earned by those workers. And a reluctance to jump around from job to job  (Hello 1998!) is making it difficult for employers to fill IT positions. That translates into a shortage -- and higher wages for the right candidate. The AeA, a Washington-based trade group formerly known as the American Electronics Association, said in a report released April 24 that there were 5.8 million high-tech jobs in the U.S. last year — up by 3% year over year. In 2005, the number of jobs grew by only about 1%, the AeA said. Last December, Robert Half Technology said its quarterly survey of more than 1,400 CIOs showed that 16% planned... Read more...
Think Geek has a terrific little USB ready digital microscope for sale. Nifty. You'll need some of this:   Simple plug and play operation with included software that allows you to magnify objects and view them on your PC up to 200X and take snapshots and time-lapse movies. You can also manipulate images with drawing and painting tools. The microscope is detachable from the stand to allow you to get closer to large objects. Just a microscopic $179.99 and it's yours.  Unlike most everything else on the internet, this item is useless for pornography. No one wants to see your pores. Would you ?... Read more...
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