Items tagged with Wave

Whuh-oh. In the quest to conquer the Internet of Things (IoT), Google’s Nest just had a hiccup; Nest Protect Smoke + CO Alarms are being “recalled” by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission due to an alert failure problem. The issue is that the Nest Wave feature, in which a user can wave his or her arms near a unit to cancel a manual test or silence an alarm, can accidentally cancel a real alarm during an emergency. We put “recalled” in quotes because users don’t actually have to send the units back; they’re not faulty, they just need a software update to turn off the Wave feature. All you have to do, according to the CPSC post, is connect your Nest... Read more...
Some days, technology comes in the form of a new MP3 player or new GPU.  But new technologies  might not always be directly related to a consumer product, but still have the potential to make a serious impact in our every day world. Panasonic has this week introduced an advanced radar technology for next-generation traffic safety systems that enables to detect humans and vehicles in a range of several tens of meters. This millimeter-wave radar technology allows for detecting objects outdoors in poor visibility conditions, such as night, rain and snow, as well as against the sunlight. When applied in traffic surveillance sensors located at intersections, this technology will help increase... Read more...
Ever heard of Swype? That's a program on Android that allows mobile users to simply leave their fingertip on the display and move it from point to point in order to input text. It's a radical change from pressing key after key, and it's clearly catching on. Nuance is a company that has been involved with touch input for awhile now, and they're introducing a similar solution for Samsung's Wave II. It's called Continuous Touch, and it's shipping now on the Wave II, Bada 1.2-powered smartphone. The technology allows users to glide their finger from one letter to another in order to spell out words, and it's being branded as QuickType for Samsung. T9 Trace is fully integrated with Nuance XT9 predictive... Read more...
Google's Wave was once one of the company's hot projects, promising a new way for people to communicate. However, the service never really seemed to catch on, at least not like Google had hoped, so the company shut it down. When Google announced plans to discontinue Wave in August, we knew that pieces of it would live on. Now, we're finding out more about what Google intends to do with Wave. In a recent blog post, Alex North, a Software Engineer on the Google Wave team explained that the company plans to expand upon the 200K lines of code that it has already open sourced. It will then release most of the Wave code in the form of a "more complete" application that Google is calling "Wave in a... Read more...
Samsung recently announced its latest Bada powered smartphone, the S7230E Wave 723. This new smartphone features a 3.2-inch touchscreen, a 5 megapixel camera with LED flash and auto-focus, an FM radio, and Dolfin Browser 2.0. Connectivity features include 3G, 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi, aGPS, and Bluetooth 3.0 + EDR. For storage, the Wave 723 has 90MB of onboard memory and a microSD card slot with support for cards as large as 16GB. The Wave 723 is built on Samsung's open Bada platform (SDK 1.1) with auto UI scaling which will make it easier for developers to port Bada apps to the Wave 723. Samsung has pitched the Bada OS as an open system designed to spur the development of applications. The S7230E Wave... Read more...
It's dead, Jim. Google Wave, the much-hyped collaboration tool that Google released in beta form just about a year ago at its developer conference, is dead. Admit it: there are plenty who think that everything Google touches turns to gold, but it's just not the case. In this case, Google said it simple enough in a blog post: not enough people were interested in Google Wave. Urs Holzle, Senior Vice President, Operations & Google Fellow said: But despite these wins, and numerous loyal fans, Wave has not seen the user adoption we would have liked. We don’t plan to continue developing Wave as a standalone product [...] Wave was supposed to be a radically different way of communicating... Read more...
One of the biggest issues that still plague phones and navigation devices that are equipped with GPS chips is indoor reception. Go under a bridge, or inside a tunnel, or inside of a building, and you'll probably have a hard time keeping a decent reception lock. It's a frustrating experience, and now that phones are being used more and more as true navigation devices, it's a growing problem that really needs a solution. Skyhook Wireless has been working on this for awhile now, with their Core Location Platform providing indoor reception on tons of phones today. The solution uses a combination of GPS, cellular data and Wi-Fi in order to position you, and it basically relies on whatever of those... Read more...
It may not seem very significant at first glance, but this is a monumental day for Samsung Electronics. While Palm has struggled with getting WebOS to the masses, and Nokia has had to merge Maemo with Intel's Moblin just so MeeGo can have a fighting chance, Samsung is pressing forward with their own mobile OS today. It's a tough world out there for software makers, particularly when you make software designed to compete directly with Windows Phone 7, iPhone OS and Android. The Samsung Wave represents Samsung's first-ever Bada cell phone. Bada OS is an all-new mobile operating system, designed mostly to be used on high-end touchscreen smartphones. It's icon-driven, and it's plenty capable of handling... Read more...
Google has their hands in a lot of buckets these days. Chrome, Chrome OS, Android, Search, Buzz, Wave, and the list goes on and on. Not everything Google touches turns to gold, and one of those things may be Wave. This launched with loads of fanfare, and some said that it would revolutionize internal corporate communication as we knew it. But so far, even the beta has seemingly flickered out in terms of importance, and there's hardly anyone left riding the Wave, at least in public. But going public, as it were, can do a lot for a company or service. Around eight months after releasing a beta to testers, Google has made the decision to open Wave up for everyone to enjoy. Or at least use. It's... Read more...
With Windows Mobile, webOS, Android, BlackBerry OS and iPhone OS dominating the smartphone scene, you might think that yet another mobile platform would just be overkill. But not if you're Samsung. The company has unveiled its first major Bada-based phone (the Wave) at Mobile World Congress in Spain, and aside from bringing a new face to the smartphone OS wars, it also has a few other "firsts" for consumers who love the cutting edge.Reportedly, it's the first smartphone that is equipped with both Bluetooth 3.0 and 802.11n Wi-Fi. Connectivity hounds should certainly appreciate that, and movie lovers will be able to get their kicks on the 3.3" Super AMOLED display, which has a 800x480 resolution.... Read more...
Google plans to begin testing a new product called Google Wave tomorrow. This new Web application combines elements of email, chat, Wiki documents, blogs, and photo-sharing sites in order to create a hosted conversation or "wave" of Internet communication. Google first demonstrated Wave at the Google I/O developer conference in San Francisco, California, in May. The product will initially be available to approximately 100,000 beta testers. This closed group will help the company find any bugs in the application before it is released to the public later this year. The application was created by brothers Jens and Lars Rasmussen, the same pair who developed Google Maps. The Rasmussen brothers hope... Read more...
The next time you are taking money out at the ATM, be wary of anyone lurking nearby with an antenna sticking out of their pants. They might be stealing your PIN wirelessly. A pair of Ph.D. students at the Security and Cryptography Laboratory (LASEC) of Switzerland's Ecole publique Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), recently demonstrated a number of techniques for listening in on the electromagnetic emanations coming from wired keyboards and interpreting that information into the actual keystrokes pressed. The two researchers, Martin Vuagnoux and Sylvain Pasini, tested four different versions of this technique on 11 different wired keyboards with PS/2 and USB connections, as well as with... Read more...
Google's been chomping at the bit over "white space," which is unused spectrum that resides next to broadcast TV spectrum, for some time now. On Monday it, announced the launch of Free the Airwaves, a site promoting the unlicensed use of "white space" spectrum. While definitely not altruistic, it certainly sells itself as such, saying its aim is to "Bring wireless Internet to everyone, everywhere." In their blog post announcing the site, Google said: "For quite some time we've been talking about the potential of the unused airwaves between broadcast TV channels ("white spaces") to provide affordable, high-speed wireless Internet connectivity nationwide. For this to happen, the Federal Communications... Read more...
There are plenty of hybrid cars on the road, but hybrid boats?  They haven't been seen.  Until now.The super-fast, super-sleek 25-foot speedboat uses a combination of electric and diesel engines to produce a low-emission vessel that should warm the hearts of the greenest motorboat sailor. "Everybody knows about hybrid cars, but hybrid boats are different," said Michael Frauscher, managing director of the company that built the boat. Most air pollution from motor boats comes in the harbor, when the boat is idling or running at low speed, said Michael Chrisman, California's secretary of resources, who went for a demonstration ride on the bay and under the Golden Gate Bridge. The hybrid... Read more...
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