Items tagged with Water-cooled

Well, well -- it sure looks as if those water-cooled GeForce rumors from late last month were spot-on. Just weeks ago, BFG called "first!" with its liquid-cooled NVIDIA GeForce 295 GTX, and now Zotac is stepping in to complete the puzzle with its watercooling-ready GTX 285.The GeForce GTX 285 Infinity Edition pairs up NVIDIA's famed GPU with a high-performance water-block for higher than usual frame rates and lower than average temperatures. The unit is cooled by an all-copper water-block, which enables it to operate at higher clock frequencies while maintaining lower operating temperatures than the existing, non-watercooled version. Just so we're clear, Zotac ships the card with a water-block... Read more...
At the back end of last month, we heard a juicy rumor that seemed, well, perfectly good enough to be true. Sure enough, the whispers of a water-cooled GTX 295 have led to a real, honest-to-goodness product, though it's not being produced by either of the vendors we expected. Instead, it's being delivered by GPU mainstay BFG Technologies.The new card easily boasts one of the longest product names we've seen to date. So long, in fact, that we'll just put it out there for you to wrap your mind around: BFG GeForce GTX 295 H2O graphics card with ThermoIntelligence Water Cooling Solution. Got all that? Underneath all the fancy wording is a standard BFG GeForce 295 dual GPU graphics card which has been... Read more...
If you consider yourself a graphics snob, there's a good chance you were still unimpressed by the performance doled out from NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 285. If so, help could soon be on the way. We're hearing reports that both Zotac and EVGA are currently working up water-cooled GTX 295 GPUs, with the former outfit also cooking up a liquid-assisted GTX 285. Granted, nothing on either of these is official just yet, but given the perpetual demand for more speed and higher frame rates, we certainly wouldn't put the idea beyond the realm of feasibility. Purportedly, the water-cooled GTX 285 could overcome the mythical 702MHz mark, while the liquid-cooled GTX 295 would certainly make a run for fastest consumer-level... Read more...
For reasons unknown, a good portion of the enthusiast market still thinks that memory cooling is a fruitless effort. Many high-end users still believe that memory chips run plenty cool, and that putting heat spreaders and heatsinks on them is a superficial effort at best, and that they don't provide any major benefits. The fact that nearly all high-end memory module and graphics card memory manufacturers use some sort of additional cooling doesn't seem to matter. For a long time, I was a member of this camp as well. The first memory modules with heat-spreaders showed themselves in 2000-2001, right about the time that the industry was shifting from SDRAM to DDR SDRAM, and Rambus RDRAM... Read more...