Items tagged with turing

NVIDIA has rather quickly fully fleshed out its family of Turing-based graphics cards. The company started off with the high-end, ray tracing-enabled GeForce RTX 2070, RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti in Fall 2018, then hit up the mainstream market with the GeForce RTX 2060 at CES 2019. Over the past few months, the company has expanded at the lower-end of the spectrum with the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti and GTX 1660. Now, NVIDIA is apparently ready to spread some GTX Turing lovin’ to gaming laptops with GeForce GTX 1660 Ti and GeForce GTX 1650 Mobility GPUs. This latest confirmation comes to us via VideoCardz, which managed to capture a slide presentation from Acer that details two upcoming... Read more...
So far, we’ve seen the arrival of two members of the GeForce GTX “Turing” family of graphics cards. The GeForce GTX 1660 Ti was the first to arrive, which was then followed up by the GeForce GTX 1660. The final and least powerful member of the family, the GeForce GTX 1650, has yet to be released, but is now turning up in benchmarks. The latest leak come courtesy of TUM_APISAK, who has been a frequent source of GeForce GTX Turing information. In this case, the GeForce GTX 1650 made an appearance on the FFXV benchmarks page, with results at 1920x1080 (High Quality) and 2560x1440 (Lite Quality) resolutions.  At the 1920x1080, the GeForce GTX 1650 offers... Read more...
ASUS is ready to deliver some potent laptop gaming goodness to customers in the coming months that feature the best of both worlds: mobile AMD Ryzen 3000 series processors and the latest NVIDIA GeForce GTX Turing-based GPUs. This information comes courtesy of noted leaker TUM APISAK, who posted his findings to Twitter. Two models are detailed in a 3DMark result that was found, and they include the ASUS ROG GU502DU and the ASUS TUF Gaming FX505DU.  The ROG GU502DU comes packing a Ryzen 7 3750H processor (4 cores, 8 threads). As we already know, this 35W processor has a base clock of 2.3GHz, but can boost to 4GHz. Even though the APU has integrated Radeon Vega graphics, ASUS... Read more...
NVIDIA has launched a new set of graphics drivers aimed specifically at creators who use programs like Adobe Photoshop and Blender Cycles. Appropriately called "Creator Ready" drivers, these will exist alongside NVIDIA's "Game Ready" driver packages that are optimized for gaming and often tuned for the latest game releases. Similar to how AMD maintains two separate sets of graphics drivers—regular and Pro version of its Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition—NVIDIA now has two sets as well. Both contain the full feature set and application support for games, so users can choose either driver they wish, depending on which they do more often—play games or create content. The primary... Read more...
When NVIDIA launched its first trio of Turing GPUs – the GeForce RTX 2070, RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti – the headlining feature of the cards was their support for hardware-based real-time ray tracing. We’ve seen titles like Battlefield V and Metro Exodus make full use of real-time ray tracing to deliver ultra-realistic reflections, water effects, and shadows (among other visual effects) to enhance the gaming experience.  The effects look amazing, but they require beefy hardware to extract acceptable performance. But given that ray tracing technology has been commoditized within DirectX 12 as DirectX Raytracing (DXR), it will soon possible for... Read more...
NVIDIA is looking to expand its presence in the high-performance workstation market with new systems that are specifically geared towards data scientists. More specifically, the machines are designed to accelerate data analytics, machine learning, and deep learning tasks that are becoming increasingly more important to a number of sectors including the finance, retail, and insurance fields. The new GPU-Accelerated Data Science Workstation reference platform makes use of dual Turing-based Quadro RTX 6000 or RTX 8000 GPUs delivering as much as 96GB of memory and up to 260 teraflops of peak compute performance (thanks to the high-speed NVLink interconnect). Backing that immense amount... Read more...
NVIDIA is attempting to push the industry forward (and simultaneously make a profit, of course) by implementing dedicated ray tracing hardware into its latest generation Turing GPU, a feature that is a staple of its GeForce RTX series. Since launching its RTX lineup, however, NVIDIA has also made available a cheaper version of Turing that lacks real-time ray tracing and DLSS hardware, and it appears yet another model is about to enter the fray. After having recently launched the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti and GeForce GTX 1660 (in that order), there are rumors of a GeForce GTX 1650 to follow. It seems like a foregone conclusion at this point. Lest there be any doubt, though, an entry for an MSI GeForce... Read more...
As it pertains to graphics cards, quite a bit has changed over the past year or so. Had you been in the market for a GPU around this time last year, you would have been staring at inflated price tags for practically every mid-range and high-end option on the market. Fast forward to today and things are looking much better, thanks to the cryptocurrency market sinking like the Titanic, and new GPU launches. NVIDIA's newest generation Turing GPU architecture has been especially helpful in spurring better prices, at least in certain segments. Sure, the initial GeForce RTX series launch hit gamers with sticker shock, but then came the GeForce RTX 2060, which is still the least expensive RTX model... Read more...
We are only a couple of weeks removed from the launch of the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti and NVIDIA is already at it again. This time around, we have yet another affordably-priced, Turing-based GPU to show you all, the GeForce GTX 1660 – sans Ti. As its naming suggest, the new GeForce GTX 1660 is very similar to its more-powerful counterpart; they’re both based on the same GPU, but a few cores and other components have been disabled in the GTX 1660. A handful of other changes have been made with the GeForce GTX 1660 as well, which push the card down a rung in terms of performance, but also bring down the price. We have a couple of GeForce GTX 1660 cards on tap for you here, one from EVGA... Read more...
The NVIDIA Titan RTX is a GPU with somewhat of an identity crisis. The card is based on a fully-enabled Turing TU102 GPU, and is technically the most powerful graphics card in NVIDIA’s current line-up for gaming. If you hit NVIDIA’s site and check out the Titan RTX’s landing page, however, it isn’t being targeted at gamers. NVIDIA’s site makes statements like, “TITAN RTX frees you to work at the full speed of your creativity” and “[TITAN RTX] provides a fast and simple start to exploring GPU-accelerated data science workflows on your PC.” The words “game” or "gaming" do not even appear on the Titan RTX page. Although some folks... Read more...
It is very likely that NVIDIA has more Turing-based GeForce GTX graphics cards up its sleeve, and rumor has it that two of the upcoming models include the GeForce GTX 1660 (non-Ti) and GeForce GTX 1650. As it pertains to the latter, a new listing in the 3DMark benchmark database may have revealed some key specs. Frequent leaker and Twitter user @TUM_APISAK posted a screenshot of the entry, which shows the GeForce GTX 1650 paired with an Intel Core i7-9750H processor. Of bigger interest than the testbed, though, are the clockspeeds and RAM—the listing indicates the GeForce GTX 1650 wields 4GB of presumed GDDR5 memory. Past leaks peg the memory bus at 128-bit, and with a 2,000MHz effective... Read more...
Although the Turing-based GeForce RTX 2000 series hit store shelves first, it was about a week before their initial unveiling that NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang took to the stage and announced the Quadro RTX family of workstation-class GPUs, targeting professional graphics applications. As of today, Quadro RTX series consists of four graphics cards, ranging from the monstrous Quadro RTX 8000 with its 48GB of GDDR6 to the Quadro RTX 4000, which targets more mainstream content creation professionals. It’s the later that we’ll be showing you here today. Looking at the Quadro RTX 4000 in light of some of NVIDIA’s other pro-graphics cards, it would appear to be a rather tame solutions.... Read more...
The GeForce GTX 1660 Ti was one of the worst kept secrets in the tech industry, as specs and retail card leaks kept leaking on a continual basis. Last week, we were finally able to get a true glimpse of what this "budget" card can do and it dominates the Pascal-based GeForce GTX 1060 while offering comparable performance to the GeForce GTX 1070. However, the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti isn't the only cut-down Turing-based card coming from NVIDIA. Word on the street is that it will be joined by the lower-spec’d GeForce GTX 1660 and GeForce GTX 1650. A new report from DigiTimes claims that is has confirmed not only the pricing of the news new gaming cards, but also their launch... Read more...
In case you missed it, NVIDIA launched its [widely leaked] GeForce GTX 1660 Ti this morning, and we've got a full review which you can check out right here. As most are well aware of at this point, the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti is based on NVIDIA's Turing GPU architecture, albeit without Tensor or RT cores, meaning that you don't have dedicated hardware for real-time ray tracing. With that being said, the GeForce RTX 1660 Ti is being positioned as a replacement for the GeForce GTX 1060, but as our benchmarks bore out, it is actually more comparable to the GeForce GTX 1070. And with a price of less than $300, the card represents a pretty compelling bargain for those that game at 1440p and below.... Read more...
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