Items tagged with SEC

The British company Thruvision has announced the T5000 Security Imaging System, a camera that can "see" under clothes using what the company calls "passive imaging technology" to identify objects by the natural electromagnetic rays that they emit. The T5000 camera, created by a company called ThruVision, uses what it calls "passive imaging technology" to identify objects by the natural electromagnetic rays--known as Terahertz or T-rays--that they emit. The high-powered camera can detect hidden objects from up to 80 feet away and is effective even when people are moving. It does not reveal physical body details and the screening is harmless, the company says. The technology, which has military... Read more...
Well, although there's likely a security hole there somewhere, the WSJ Online has accepted Facebook's friend request with the "Seen This?" feature.Hoping to tap into the growing buzz of online social networks, the Journal is adding a feature to its Web site that will allow readers to see which Journal stories are popular among that user's Facebook friends. The feature, which goes live early Wednesday morning, is called "SeenThis?" and is powered by a company called Loomia Inc. Financial terms weren't disclosed.This is the WSJ's Online second foray into friendship.  Remember they teamed with Digg earlier?... Read more...
Sharkoon Swift-Case Securita: With RFID encryption to protect against unauthorized access for 2.5" SATA hard drives In order to offer customers the best possible protection against data thieves, Sharkoon is expanding its Swift-Case line up of external hard drive enclosures by adding a model with RFID access control. The Sharkoon Swift-Case Securita for 2.5" SATA hard drives comes equipped with RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) technology that protects against unauthorized access. Within the silver aluminium enclosure sits a RFID transceiver that responds solely to the accompanying RFID transponder. The transponder comes in a simple plastic fob design that attaches securely to key chains.... Read more...
It's lots of fun to see all the gaudy and enormous things displayed at the Consumer Electronics Show. But when you see a CEO standing next to a television the size of a roadside billboard that costs more than your last divorce did, you wonder if much of it will ever turn out to be a big hit with the general public. Brier Dudley poked around in the less traveled and decidedly unglamorous corners of the CES, and found what he thinks is the real next big thing: a pile of vinyl mats next to a Nintendo WiiComputer-monitor covers? Toilet-tank protectors? I had no idea....... The mats are aftermarket covers for Wii Fit, a new game from Nintendo that uses a plastic step as a controller. The game was... Read more...
Could anything else possibly fit the word "ironic" better than this?Part of security software vendor CA's Web site was hacked earlier this week and was redirecting visitors to a malicious Web site hosted in China.Although the problem now appears to have been corrected, cached versions of some pages in the press section of CA.com show that earlier this week the site had been redirecting visitors to the uc8010.com domain, which has been serving malicious software since late December, according to Marcus Sachs, director of the SANS Internet Storm Center.No comment from CA in the story, so it's unknown if they were using their own products to protect the site or not.... Read more...
Best year ever (!) for Amazon.com. Amazon.com, Inc. today announced the 2007 holiday season finished as its best ever, with its busiest day being December 10. On that day, Amazon customers ordered more than 5.4 million items, which is 62.5 items per second. In addition, the company wrapped up its second year of Amazon Customers Vote, with more than 4.6 million votes cast during the promotion."We are very grateful to our customers," said Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon.com. "On behalf of Amazon.com employees around the globe, we wish everyone happy holidays and best wishes for 2008."The press release said "Amazon.com sold Nintendo Wii systems at approximately 17 per second when they were... Read more...
Modern PCs are inching closer and closer to having 10 GB/sec or more usable memory bandwidth, and we haven't really had any complaints about the steady increase until we heard that Rambus was working on technology that could enable 1 TB/sec of memory bandwidth.The applications for graphics cards and consoles are certainly interesting, but we think that desktop and server CPUs might also end up benefiting from such an increase.  Consider that when Intel released the P4, its theoretical memory bandwidth was 6.4 GB/sec, and that was 4 years ago.  Today's CPUs have 4 cores, and it is safe to say each core is faster overall and thus could use more bandwidth.So how does Rambus plan... Read more...
Yep, not only did the PlayStation 3 get a firmware upgrade today (to 2.0), part of that upgrade includes what Trend Micro says is the first product of its kind for a gaming console.Trend's service is available as part of Sony's 2.00 firmware update for the PS3, also released on Thursday. The service will initially be free for users through April 2008, but Trend has not yet released future pricing, said Keith Reed, Trend's online manager for Europe.Gaming systems are increasingly accessing the Internet, to download new games or for Web browsing, which potentially expose the machines to the same kind of threats as desktop PCs, Reed said. That's right, make it free at first, suck 'em in, and then... Read more...
The Sectera Edge was developed under the NSA Secure Mobile Environment/Portable Electronic Device program (SME PED) and will eventually be supplied to the DOD and Homeland Security.  It will be able to switch between the government's Secret Internet Protocol Router Network (SIPRNet) and Non-classified Internet Protocol Router Network (NIPRNet).   I'll bet you think I'm making those up, don't you? The National Security Agency has authorized military and government personnel to order up a bunch of General Dynamics' Sectera Edge secure, wireless smartphones, which will not only allow them to make secure calls but also to email and Web-browse in either classified or unclassified mode.... Read more...
The words "game software" in a subject always catches our attention.  In this case researchers are trying to teach guards how to randomize their search routes, to better patrol airports.Guards are usually told to patrol in a random fashion but, being human, they tend to form habits that patient criminals can exploit. To help make their rounds less predictable, Paruchuri and colleagues created software based on game theory that simulates various random paths that a guard could take around Los Angeles International airport (LAX), and also how criminals might react. Potential rewards, such as catching more criminals, and costs, such as a terrorist explosion, are evaluated for each path.... Read more...
Just about everybody has heard of Second Life, and how many retailers have purchased a virtual store and even hawked virtual goods with a real-world likeness.  But a recent report is showing, not surprisingly, that the hype inspired but such stories as mostly that, hype.In fact it seems that Second Life has become less than attractive to many advertisers by comparison to newer web-communities:“According to the recently published Yankee Group Note, Wither Second Life?, the growth rate of Second Life users has slowed since its peak in October 2006, while user engagement (as measured by average time spent per user) has leveled off at just 12 minutes per month. This is in stark contrast to other... Read more...
It's been nearly two years since since Sony got into the rootkit business. Not intentionally, but the DRM installed by Sony BMG CDs when you tried to play them on your PC had rootkit qualities. Not only that, but in a real-life example of the vulnerability, hackers used it to hack World of Warcraft.Unfortunately, it seems Sony did not learn its lesson. According to F-Secure Corp., the fingerprint-reader software included with the Sony MicroVault USM-F line of flash drives installs a driver that hides in a hidden directory under "c:\windows". That directory, and the files within it, are not visible through Windows' usual APIs (application programming interface), said F-Secure researcher... Read more...
Apple and AT&T have been sued for a second time over the controversial battery replacement plan for the iPhone.  You may recall that last month Jose Trujillo of Melrose Park, Ill. sued the companies for $75,000 in damages over the battery.  Monday a second lawsuit was filed, this time in California, alleging that Apple and AT&T deliberately withheld information pertaining to battery replacement until after the device launched. "The issue is whether or not Apple properly disclosed the problems with battery life," Max Folkenflik, a managing partner at New York-based Folkenflik and McGerity, told ABCNEWS.com. Folkenflik is one law firm representing the California-based plaintiff... Read more...
You may recall earlier in the year the crackdown placed on bloggers by the military, who said that such blogging could pose a security threat by leaking sensitive wartime information.  Yet, haven't we seen huge amounts of sensitive information leaked on the Internet by government agencies?  (Nods head in agreement)  A series of audits has shown that official DoD websites pose far more of a threat than soldiers' blogs. The audits, performed by the Army Web Risk Assessment Cell between January 2006 and January 2007, found at least 1,813 violations of operational security policy on 878 official military websites. In contrast, the 10-man, Manassas, Virginia, unit discovered 28 breaches, at most,... Read more...
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