Items tagged with samsung 980 pro

Sony's PlayStation 5 launched back in mid-November with two configurations: the standard PlayStation 5 with a Blu-ray drive and the disc-less PlayStation 5 Digital Edition. No matter which you select, you'll get an 825GB SSD with just 667GB leftover for your games and other data you wish to store. Some people saw this as a liability compared to the Xbox Series X, which comes with a slightly larger 1TB SSD (802GB useable), but Sony has one critical advantage. The PlayStation 5 can expand its storage via an open M.2 slot inside the console, and better yet, it can use a garden variety PCIe 4.0 SSD. However, Sony didn't enable this functionality at launch and has been mum about the timeline for allowing... Read more...
Intel's 11th generation Rocket Lake-S processors are on deck to launch during Q1 2021, and excitement is building. Leading up to the official launch, Intel has been dropping hints about the new processor family's performance compared to AMD's lineup of Ryzen processors. Today, Intel gives us a very early preview of how the storage subsystem will fair against systems using AMD's Zen 3-based Ryzen 5000 processors. In this case, Intel is touting its alleged superior PCIe 4.0 performance with its upcoming flagship Core i9-11900K against AMD's flagship Ryzen 9 5950X. Intel paired its processor with an ASUS Z590 ROG Maximus XIII Hero motherboard, while the AMD processor was coupled with an ASUS X570... Read more...
Thank the stars above that prices on solid state drives (SSDs) are no longer stratospheric, having plummeted down to earth. Granted, the price-per-gigabyte ratio is still better on mechanical hard disk drive (HDD) storage, but SSDs are fast and attainable on a budget. Especially now—with Cyber Monday in view, Samsung's incredibly fast 970 Evo Plus and 980 Pro SSDs are on sale at Amazon. As we noted in our review of the 970 Evo Plus, this SSD line is optimized for speed in a big way. It is a worthy upgrade over the regular Evo line (read: non-Plus), with much faster write speeds—up to 3,300MB/s, versus 2,500MB/s. Rated sequential reads did not change, but were already blazing fast... Read more...