Items tagged with Opteron

Earlier this week we discussed new details on AMD's two next-generation cores, Bobcat and Bulldozer. AMD built the two processors to fill two distinct markets, with Bobcat focusing on netbooks/notebooks, and Bulldozer in servers, workstations, and high-end desktops. It's now rumored that AMD is investigating whether or not it could make a decent bit of scratch by launching Bobcat-powered server processors. Don't laugh—it makes more sense than you think. The server industry has embraced virtualization as a means of improving utilization and overall efficiency, but it's not the option. There are various reasons why—in some cases, high-end x86 processors chew through too much energy... Read more...
When AMD released its second quarter financial results last month it didn't say much about server volumes or market share, save to note that its performance "met expectations." The major news of the call turned out to be the company's decision to pull Bobcat's launch into 2010 and push Llano into 2011, which defrayed most conversation on market share. If AMD's server sales were indeed within the company's expectations, it can only mean the company was expecting to be pummeled. According to IDC's figures, Intel finished Q2 with 93.5 percent of the server market, up 3.3 percent, while AMD's share decreased to 6.5 percent, down by the same amount. That's rather depressing news considering AMD's... Read more...
When AMD's 8-12 core Magny-Cours architecture launched three months ago, we noted that it was simply the first step in a two-pronged refresh and the beginning of a top-to-bottom revamp of AMD's server offerings. As of today, AMD has finished that process; the company's new Opteron 4100 series (codenamed Lisbon) updates the 4-6 core server products the same way Magny-Cours updated and extended the upper end of the server market. Unlike Magny-Cours, AMD's Lisbon series features the same 4-6 cores that have been available via existing Istanbul/Shanghai processors, but deliver several CPU and chipset enhancements. Lisbon CPUs now support the power-saving C1E mode which can substantially reduce processor... Read more...
AMD launched its new Maranello server platform and accompanying 8-12 core Magny-Cours processors today. The new products are two prongs of a three-pronged offensive AMD has launched at its rival. Both Magny-Cours and Maranello are evolutionary products—we'll have to wait for Bulldozer to really shake things up—but the CPU manufacturer has aggressively overhauled and flattened its price structure. That revamp is the third prong and it's the anchor of AMD's 2010-2011 strategy.More Cores, Different SocketMagny-Cours is a twelve-core processor built by stacking two Istanbul chips side-by-side. Unlike previous AMD processors, Magny-Cours is an MCM (multi-chip module), the eight-core version of... Read more...
Intel rocked the processor world a few weeks ago with the introduction of the six-core Core i7-980X Extreme Edition, but now we're beginning to wonder if there's any stop to this "core" madness. AMD has just shook things up even further with the new Opteron 6000 series platform, boasting Direct Connect Architecture 2.0 and plenty of power for server applications.AMD is gloating about a 119% increase in performance here, all while maintaining a low price and low power drain. What's most interesting, though, is that this platform features the world’s first 8- and 12-core x86 processor for the high-volume 2P and value 4P server market. Already, leading OEMs including HP, Dell, Acer Group, Cray,... Read more...
It's been just over a year since AMD completed its spinoff of GlobalFoundries in an attempt to radically change its own financial trajectory. The gamble appears to have paid off for both companies; we recently sat down with GlobalFoundries executives to talk about the company's first year and plans for the future. GlobalFoundries current roadmap is as follows: The company will ship 40nm LP (low power) silicon starting this quarter and 32nm SOI in the back half of 2010. The left edge of each box denotes 'risk production,' aka early commercial production. One of the reasons we originally contacted GF was to clear up some confusion around the 32nm/28nm process nodes. When GlobalFoundries first... Read more...
We've already covered AMD's upcoming Magny-Cours processor and associated Maranello server platform in some detail, but AMD is apparently wanting to build some buzz around its new hardware. Over at his AMD blog, AMD's director of product marketing John Fruehe recently spilled the beans on a 48-core contest. The AMD Server team is kicking March off with a new contest. We are seeking your best essays, videos, or blog posts documenting how you might use 48 cores...Tell us what you can do with 48 cores to make the world a better, more interesting place, delivering the top performance or optimizing power. Of course creativity will be awarded, so don’t be afraid to show the fun side of servers...Here’s... Read more...
In a blog post yesterday, AMD's director of product marketing John Fruehe announced that the company is now shipping its eight and 12-core "Magny-Cours" processors to OEMs and select manufacturers. Magny-Cours, you may recall, is AMD's next-generation server CPU and consists of two Istanbul cores side-by-side on the same package. Since AMD has no native octal-core design, it's implied that the eight-core version of Magny-Cours consists of two Istanbul processors with two cores on each disabled. If Magny-Cours is more-or-less an Istanbulx2, however, the upcoming Maranello platform is something altogether different. Maranello, which uses an LGA-style pinout, supports 16-48 cores, and provides each... Read more...
There's been an invisible hexa-core processor lurking on AMD's desktop roadmap ever since the company launched Shanghai on 45nm, but the company has refused to confirm or deny that such a chip was in the works—until now. As of today, AMD's hexa-core desktop processor—codenamed Thuban—is officially on the board. Exact launch dates aren't yet available, but we've got a few details on the core architecture. For those of you who care about this sort of thing, Thuban is a star in the constellation Draco and was once a pole star roundabout 3000 BC.(Six inch clear platform heels are much older than anyone realizes -Ed). Thuban, like Istanbul, will be a monolithic core and will utilize the same 45nm... Read more...
Slowly but surely, cloud and dense computing environments are becoming more and more popular. With services such as Apple's MobileMe and Google's own application suite living on the web, it's not hard to see why these tactics are becoming more pervasive. And wouldn't you know it--AMD is chomping at the bit to make sure it gets in on the bandwagon early. Today, the company is introducing the immediate availability of the new six-core Opteron EE processor at 40W ACP. Designed specifically to provide plenty of power for cloud computing environments without the power draw of more gamer-centric processors, this unit promises up to 31% higher performance-per-watt over standard Quad-Core AMD Opteron... Read more...
AMD shot its Istanbul Opteron chip out like a cannon to lead June off, and now we're seeing Penguin Computing pick it up as an integral part of its Altus Series products. If you've never heard of this company, it's because they aren't' exactly consumer-level. Instead, this outfit focuses on high performance computing solutions, and its Altus 1701 and Altus 2701 dual-processor enterprise servers are now available with six-core Opteron CPUs. In fact, this chip can also be fitted into the Altus 1702 twin-node HPC cluster server and the Altus 2704 quad processor enterprise server, and if you're hunting specifics, you'll find options for the Opteron 2400 and 8400 series processors. Penguin's new Altus... Read more...
We aren't quite calling this the turnaround of the decade just yet, but with just six months to go until 2010, AMD is doing its best to make a late run for said crown. In years past, Advanced Micro Devices had become notorious for delaying products. Now, they're doing their best to right the ship by unveiling a product's availability some five months ahead of schedule. In CPU years, five months is an eternity. The new six-core AMD Opteron (codenamed "Istanbul") is shipping out to OEM customers today, and the chip should be available to consumers by the end of this month. Hailed as the world’s first six-core server processor with Direct Connect Architecture for two-, four- and eight-socket... Read more...
While most of the buzz surrounding AMD of late has focused on its all new Phenom II X4 955 processor and its plans for 12- and 16-core processors in 2011, the company celebrated Earth Day earlier this week with a less notable, less energy-intensive option. The newly introduced AMD Opteron EE processor includes the company's lowest x86 quad-core server power band, offering 13$ power savings in platform-level power consumption compared to previous generation )the quad-core Opteron HE).The 40-watt chip is engineered for very dense data center environments such as those built for cloud computing, web serving, or other highly dense environments, and it offers up a full suite of virtualization and... Read more...
History has shown that Advanced Micro Devices doesn't have the greatest track record for delivering chips as promised (at least right on schedule), but the company's looking to make a change for the better starting with its highly anticipated six-core Istanbul. Said CPU, which falls in the Opteron family, promises to provide up to 30 percent more performance within the same power envelope and on the same platform as current Quad-Core AMD Opteron processors, and while we've already seen it demonstrated and slated for a 2H 2009 launch, AMD's bringing cautious smiles out everywhere with its latest update. AMD Istanbul Die - Image courtesy: AMDAs the company revamps and refreshes its processor roadmap,... Read more...
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