Items tagged with Haswell

A few months ago, we detailed Intel's low-power plans with Haswell and how the company was planning to push mainstream x86 processors into much lower TDPs than it had previously discussed. Santa Clara still intends to deliver Haswell parts at 10W or below, but it's accelerated the delivery of sub-10W parts even further. Today, it officially announced a series of chips with a 7W "Scenario Design Power." SDP is a new-ish metric Intel is introducing with these new processors. SDP is defined as an additional thermal reference point based on mainstream workloads on tablet devices. This is the sort of change-up that tends to touch off allegations of lying and misrepresentation. I'm going to try to... Read more...
Intel’s upcoming fourth-generation Core-i7 CPUs (codenamed Haswell) promise to be game-changers, and we’ve reported on some of the specifications of its accompanying Z87 chipset, as well. Apparently, VR-Zone has gotten its hands on leaked details of the impending processor line, including the targeted launch date of April 2013. The naming scheme should pick up where the third-generation Ivy Bridge chips did, using “3000” and “4000” numbering for third- and fourth-generation CPUs, respectively, which will be helpful in identifying the fourteen individual SKUs that Intel plans to release. Intel's Dadi Perlmutter Standard voltage processors (which should come... Read more...
It's been a nice, long ride for the conventional PCI (Peripheral Component Interconnect) slot, but with the introduction of Intel's game-changing Haswell platform, the Santa Clara chip maker is reportedly doing away with support for the legacy ports. If you've been holding onto an earlier model Sound Blaster card or any other peripheral still using the old-school ports, go ahead and plan their retirement party now. Intel's Z87 chipset for Haswell isn't just about getting rid of old technologies. In a nod towards future-proofing, Z87 will reportedly boast support for half a dozen SATA 6Gbps connectors, rather than two SATA 6Gbps and four SATA 3Gbps as supported on the Z77 chipset. In other words,... Read more...
Intel's next-generation CPU, codenamed Haswell, was the major star of IDF. One aspect of the chip we haven't talked about at length, however, is its emphasis on reduced power consumption. When Intel announced that its Ivy Bridge mobile products would target 17W for mainstream systems, it made headlines. Pushing Haswell down to 10W is an even greater achievement, but hitting these targets requires a great deal of collaboration and cooperation... Intel's Game Changer, One Size Fits All Haswell... Read more...
Intel's next-generation CPU, codenamed Haswell, was the major star of IDF. One aspect of the chip we haven't talked about at length, however, is its emphasis on reduced power consumption. When Intel announced that its Ivy Bridge mobile products would target 17W for mainstream systems, it made headlines. Pushing Haswell down to 10W is an even greater achievement, but hitting these targets requires a great deal of collaboration and cooperation. Intel's Dadi Perlmutter, Executive Vice President, Architecture Group with Xeon Phi and Atom CPUs For most of the past 40 years, power consumption was treated as an afterthought at virtually every level. Unless you were building specialized hardware for... Read more...
Traditionally at IDF, Intel's Advanced Technology Zone is where all the cool stuff happens.  Whether it be public demos setup for hands-on opportunities with next generation Intel technologies or backroom sessions with Intel Advanced Engineering and Marketing teams showing early engineering samples to members of the press, this place is where we get up close and personal with many of the unveilings that Intel rolls out over the course of the conference. Yesterday we spent time with Intel's Performance Engineering and Benchmark teams discussing what encompasses a satisfying user experience on the ultra-mobile platforms that are all the rage in the market today.  On display were... Read more...
Intel’s Dadi (David) Perlmutter, General Manager Intel Architecture Group and Chief Product Officer, opened up the 2012 Intel Developers Forum by reflecting back on the significance of this day, the eleventh anniversary of the attacks on 9/11. Today, however, also marks the fifteenth anniversary of IDF, so Dadi ultimately moved on to a quick overview of the many advances and innovations that have taken place at Intel since the event began in 1997. Perlmutter showed off a Medfield SoC alongside a Xeon Phi, along with a number of Intel Atom and Core powered Windows 8 tablets and Ultrabooks, but he finished with a couple of live demos showing the company’s upcoming Haswell-based 4th... Read more...
Intel's Dadi Perlmutter took to the stage in the opening keynote of Intel Developer's Forum 2012 to greet an enthusiastic crowd and evangelize the company's vision of what they call the rise of "natural, intuitive computing."  On stage with Dadi were a number of Intel-powered devices including a myriad of Windows 8 tablets and new Ultrabooks from various manufacturers.  To be honest, Intel didn't disclose a lot of juicy detail on next generation hardware for the first 20 minutes or so of Dadi's presentation but they focused on a few very innovative new usage models, user interfaces, capabilities and features that are now possible as a result of Intel's relentless, continuous advancements... Read more...
Intel's Dadi Perlmutter took to the stage in the opening keynote of Intel Developer's Forum 2012 to greet an enthusiastic crowd and evangelize the company's vision of what they call the rise of "natural, intuitive computing."  On stage with Dadi were a number of Intel-powered devices including a myriad of Windows 8 tablets and new Ultrabooks from various manufacturers.  To be honest, Intel didn't disclose a lot of juicy detail on next generation hardware for the first 20 minutes or so of Dadi's presentation but they focused on a few very innovative new usage models, user interfaces, capabilities and features that are now possible as a result of Intel's relentless, continuous advancements... Read more...
Intel’s Dadi (David) Perlmutter, General Manager Intel Architecture Group and Chief Product Officer, opened up the 2012 Intel Developers Forum by reflecting back on the significance of this day, the eleventh anniversary of the attacks on 9/11. Today, however, also marks the fifteenth anniversary of IDF, so Dadi ultimately moved on to a quick overview of the many advances and innovations that have taken place at Intel since the event began in 1997. Perlmutter showed off a Medfield SoC alongside a Xeon Phi, along with a number of Intel Atom and Core powered Windows 8 tablets and Ultrabooks, but he finished with a couple of live demos showing the company’s upcoming Haswell-based... Read more...
Ahead of this week's IDF, Intel's annual Developer's Forum, the company let an interesting number slip through the cracks: 10W. With all of the leaks we've seen so far, along with information Intel itself has revealed, it's clear that the company has been focusing like never before on power efficiency with its Haswell microarchitecture. "10W" highlights that well. As Intel's TDP ratings include the GPU, that number becomes all the more impressive. Whereas Ivy Bridge was an evolutionary update to Sandy Bridge, Haswell has been built from the ground-up, as part of Intel's "Tock" phase. The ultimate goal? To take full advantage of both the 22nm process and 3D "tri-gate" transistors. Haswell will... Read more...
Today at the Hot Chips Symposium, AMD's CTO Mark Papermaster is taking the wraps off AMD's upcoming CPU core, codenamed Steamroller. Steamroller is the third iteration of Sunnyvale's Bulldozer architecture and an extremely important part. Bulldozer, launched just over a year ago, was a major disappointment. The company's second-generation Bulldozer implementation, codenamed Piledriver, made a number of important changes and was incorporated into the Trinity APU family that debuted last spring. Steamroller is the first refresh of Bulldozer's underlying architecture and may finally deliver the sort of performance and efficiency AMD was aiming for when it built 'Dozer in the first place. In the... Read more...
Intel's presentations at the International Solid State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) this year are focused on one of the biggest problems facing modern CPU designers—how to improve power efficiency without sacrificing compute performance. Intel isn't just tackling this problem through conventional process shrinks and smaller dies, however; the company detailed multiple new approaches. First up is Claremont, Intel's first chip built to run on Near Threshold Voltage (NTV) technology. The term "Near Threshold Voltage" refers to the amount of voltage required to switch a transistor from 0 to 1. Normally, the voltage variation between the two states is significant in order to prevent transistors... Read more...
The CPU design firm Venray Technology announced a new product design this week that it claims can deliver enormous performance benefits by combining CPU and DRAM on to a single piece of silicon. We spent some time earlier this fall discussing the new TOMI (Thread Optimized Multiprocessor) with company CTO Russell Fish, but while the idea is interesting; its presentation is marred by questionable conceptualizing and suspect analytics. The Multicore Problem: There are three limiting factors, or walls, that limit the scaling of modern microprocessors. First, there's the memory wall, defined as the gap between the CPU and DRAM clock speed. Second, there's the ILP (Instruction Level Parallelism)... Read more...
Intel announced its Q4 and end-of-year results with $54B in revenue and $17.5 billion in operating income, both records for the CPU giant. Q4 income was $13.9B, driven by a 17% rise in sales from the PC Client Group. Revenue growth was positive across all sectors save for Atom; sales of the diminutive processor fell 57% year on year, to $167 million.  Growth continues to be driven primarily by the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) countries; sales in Indonesia and India grew 22% and 37% year-on-year, while China now accounts for 20% of Intel's worldwide demand. 2011 was an excellent year all around for Intel, and the company had quite a bit to crow about on its earnings call, including... Read more...
The second day of IDF began with Mooly Eden, Intel VP and General Manager of the PC Client Group, and his keynote discussion, detailing the current state of the company’s business and Ultrabook plans. Eden also spoke of the adaptability of the PC and the many transformations it has made over the years to meet market demand and dictate new usage models and experiences. From Ivy Bridge DX11 performance to new power saving LCD technologies, Intel's new Identity Theft Protection suite, Haswell demos and Thunderbolt IO for PCs, Mooly covered a lot of ground as usual.... Read more...
Intel's got a bright future, and if you're planning to buy an Intel-based notebook in 2013 or beyond, that bright future will include you. Of course, Intel's been talking the talk with regard to power savings for years, but it's always a challenge to integrate more functionality and increase performance, while keep power in check. Intel's Atom line-up was successful, but not stellar, and we're still waiting on a commercial Intel-based smartphone. ARM-based systems have been eating Intel's lunch in the low power arena but Haswell, according to Intel, could be a game-changer. Intel is currently developing their 2013 line of Haswell CPU products for Ultrabooks. That's in addition to the Ivy Bridge... Read more...
As is traditionally the case, Intel’s CEO Paul Otellini opened up the Intel Developer’s Forum with a keynote address in the theater at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. The focus of Otellini’s talk was the “future of computing” and how Intel plans to capitalize on current trends and growth in the mobile device market. Otellini’s opinion is that we are still in the early stages in this evolution of computing and moving forward, no one device will be at the center of the computing experience.  But of course, Intel plans to capitalize on all of them.... Read more...
As is traditionally the case, Intel’s CEO Paul Otellini opened up the Intel Developer’s Forum with a keynote address in the theater at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. The focus of Otellini’s talk was the “future of computing” and how Intel plans to capitalize on current trends and growth in the mobile device market. Otellini’s opinion is that we are still in the early stages in this evolution of computing and moving forward, no one device will be at the center of the computing experience.  But of course, Intel plans to capitalize on all of them.           To power all of the different devices, whether they be... Read more...
All-in-one (AIO) systems like Apple's iMacs or the Asus 2400ET that were reviewed earlier this year are much like notebooks, in that they trade potential upgradeability for convenience and a smaller footprint. RAM is the one component users can count on being able to upgrade, though some models may offer an additional hard drive bay or a slot for a mini-PCIe card. The ECS G11 is a different sort of animal; ECS is marketing the system as featuring a user-replaceable motherboard. The system ships with a bog-standard mini-ITX board based on Intel's H61 chipset, supports up to 8GB of DDR3-1333, includes a slim DVD optical drive, a 150W power adapter, and wireless support. USB 2.0 connectivity is... Read more...
AMD has revised its purchase agreement with Global Foundries in a move that will allow the CPU design firm to recognize a $492 million non-cash gain in Q1. Instead of purchasing 45nm and 32nm wafers on a "cost-plus" basis, Sunnyvale will pay GlobalFoundries a fixed price for products through the end of the year. Reactions to the change have been mixed. The fixed-price model allows AMD to only pay for viable 32nm parts, but raises questions about GlobalFoundries' 32nm yields. AMD's ownership stake in GF has fallen considerably in the past two years, but GloFo remains Sunnyvale's premier foundry partner by a sizeable margin. According to the company's presentation, the original wafer purchase agreements... Read more...
Both TSMC and GlobalFoundries have released new information on their respective plans for the next few years. TSMC has announced its intention to double its 2011 R&D capital expenditure to $700 million, while it simultaneously spends $7.8B over the next year in order to increase its manufacturing capacity by approximately 20 percent. This is presumedly over and above what the company has spent thus far on constructing its new "gigafab" foundry, Fab 15. TSMC began work on Fab 15 last summer, but the plant isn't scheduled to come online until 2012; TSMC is most likely building out capacity at an already established plant. TSMC's production growth over the past few years. Information provided... Read more...
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