Items tagged with FTC

Intel, the largest chip maker on this or any other known planet, cleared at least one major hurdle in its attempt to acquire security firm McAfee. That hurdle? The Federal Trade Commission, which has given the proposed $7.68 billion deal its stamp of approval. "The Federal Trade Commission has concluded its review of the proposed McAfee transaction and has cleared it. We are continuing to work with the staff at the European Commission as they continue their review," Kevin Sellers, Intel VP of Investor Relations, said in a statement. The FTC's approval comes just days after mutterings that European regulators might not be too keen on the deal because of antitrust concerns. According to a report... Read more...
When the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) settled their investigation of Intel, one of the stipulations of the agreement was that Intel would continue to support the PCI Express standard for the next six years. Intel agreed to all the FTC's demands (without actually admitting that it did anything wrong), but Intel's upcoming Oak Trail Atom platform presented something of a conundrum. Oak Trail was finalized long before the FTC and Intel began negotiating, which means Santa Clara could have been banned from shipping the platform. The FTC and Intel have jointly announced an agreement covering Oak Trail that allows Intel to sell the platform without adding PCIe support—for now. Come 2013, all... Read more...
The Federal Trade Commission can close the books on its case against Intel, the world's largest chip maker, after the two sides were able to hammer out a settlement. Intel stood accused of anticompetitive practices, which is legal speak for being a bully in the marketplace, and under terms of the agreement, the Santa Clara chip maker must refrain from offering "conditioning benefits" to manufacturers who agree to roll with Intel exclusively, or "retaliating against" manufacturers who don't. "This case demonstrates that the FTC is willing to challenge anticompetitive conduct by even the most powerful companies in the fastest-moving industries," said Chairman Jon Leibowitz. "By accepting this settlement,... Read more...
At the time of this writing, the FTC's investigation into Intel's alleged monopolistic abuses is on hold as the government attempts to negotiate a settlement with the CPU and chipset manufacturer. If these negotiations don't result in a deal by July 22, the case returns to court, with arguments currently scheduled to begin on September 15. Intel is no stranger to these sorts of lawsuits; between AMD and the EU, the CPU giant has been battling such allegations for years. The lawsuit between NV and Intel, however, rests on different points than the AMD/Intel allegations. Here, the battle is over whether or not Intel's already-negotiated agreements with NVIDIA give the latter permission to produce... Read more...
Back in December of last year, the FTC filed an antitrust lawsuit against Intel, alleging that the CPU giant had abused its market position and limited sales of competitive products from the likes of AMD and NVIDIA. We've heard very little about the case since then, but the company and FTC have just jointly filed a request to suspend litigation proceedings until July 22 in order to evaluate a proposed deal. No details have been made public regarding the proposed resolution and both Intel and AMD have refused to discuss the arrangement. An unnamed spokesperson from NVIDIA told Mercury News that the GPU designer was similarly in the dark. "We don't yet know details behind the FTC's announcement,... Read more...
A few weeks after Apple announced its revised programming rules for iPhad devices, Adobe dropped the bombshell that it was abandoning Apple's platform. Up until late April, Adobe had tirelessly pledged Flash support for the iPhone, but certain changes to the developer license made it too risky for the company to continue development. Apple and Adobe have publicly sparred in the last week and the Flash developer may have deliberately upped the ante. Sources at the FTC revealed today that the regulatory agency is preparing to investigate Apple's developer license to see if it unfairly restricts competition—purportedly at Adobe's request. The troublesome section of Apple's developer license is 3.3.1,... Read more...
It's been a few months since we've talked much about the FTC's investigation of Intel's alleged abusive, monopolistic behavior but the case isn't sitting still. NVIDIA is a major party of the inquiry and the GPU manufacturer has just launched a new area within its own site dubbed "The Case For Innovation" detailing the findings and documents of the case. "One of the FTC's concerns is Intel's attempt to and behavior of blocking the GPU from getting into the marketplace," said Jen-Hsun Huang, NVIDIA's CEO. "Today if you were buying a high-end desktop PC you could have amazing graphics and the GPU inside is doing 3D graphics for you...in certain form factors, like notebooks, where Intel bundles... Read more...
When the FTC sued Intel last week over the company's alleged anti-competitive behaviors, we noted that NVIDIA could be one of the main proponents (and beneficiaries) of such a lawsuit, particularly given the price structure of Intel's Atom products. It's now been alleged that NVIDIA's interest in the FTC's investigation goes beyond Atom's chipset; The New York Times claims the GPU designer may have been working on an x86 processor since 2007. This particular rumor has been kicked around a time or ten before, but the FTC complaint does raise the question. (If you want to see the full FTC complaint, you can view it here.) According to the FTC, Intel's decision to sell Atom+chipset packages at a... Read more...
AMD and Intel may have settled their court case and bills—Intel paid the smaller company $1.25 billion last week—but the manufacturer has been hit with an additional charge of unlawful behavior, this time from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). According to the FTC's complaint, Intel has systemically waged a campaign to "shut out rivals’ competing microchips by cutting off their access to the marketplace. In the process, Intel deprived consumers of choice and innovation in the microchips that comprise the computers’ central processing unit, or CPU." “Intel has engaged in a deliberate campaign to hamstring competitive threats to its monopoly,” said Richard A. Feinstein, Director of the FTC’s... Read more...
Facebook's Terms of Service (TOS) changed a couple of weeks ago, but wasn't noticed until brought to people's attention by the site Consumerist. Despite some fast tap-dancing by Facebook, the cat's out of the bag, and it's not going back in. In fact, the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) is preparing a formal complaint to be sent to the FTC. EPIC Executive Director Marc Rotenberg said: "We think that Facebook should go back to its original terms of service"Facebook made changes to their TOS which seemed to imply they owned you information in perpetuity. While denying it in a blog post and explaining it in a way that made sense:One of the questions about our new terms of use is whether... Read more...
If you've been wondering if Intel's 80+ percent market share of the microprocessor market amounted to a monopoly worth investigating, wonder no more. The Federal Trade Commision has started a formal review of Intel's business practices to see if they run afoul of any anti-competitive laws. They're sending out subpoenas to AMD and some of the many computer manufacturers that use Intel's chips in their units as well. A.M.D. has waged a global legal and public relations campaign against Intel hoping to persuade American and foreign regulators that Intel’s pricing practices violate antitrust laws. The fight between the two — over a market that generates revenue of more than $225 billion a year —... Read more...
Well, we are trying to imagine just how the Wii's innovative controller could be used in this case, but we would prefer to ... make no comment.Within a game display in a random Japanese game store an ad for Osouji Sentai Clean Keeper reads “worldly desires are completely open.” Whenever you see something like that used to advertise a game in Japan you’re usually in for a graphic adventure novel on a disc and low and behold that’s what it is.In Osouji Sentai Clean Keeper you basically save underage looking scantily clad women, who are actually in their 20s, from some kind of devil. When you do, by basically choosing numbered options with the Wiimote, you get a victory video of one of the girls... Read more...
The Consumerist featured a story a year ago about a woman that wasn't allowed to buy an Apple computer because she wanted to purchase it solely using Apple-issued giftcards. Stung by negative publicity, Apple relented and she got her computer. But instead of liberalizing their giftcard policy, Apple simply gave the one customer a computer paid for with giftcards and then changed their giftcard FAQ. Others shut out in Apple's giftcard eligibility maze want a computer too. Or maybe their money back. I have 7 gift cards totaling $1250. Apple refuses to sell me a computer despite having $1250 upfront.As soon as I found I could not enter more than half my gift cards on the Apple website, I used their... Read more...
The latest victim of the FTC's Spyware crackdown is the well known Zango software. Zango, formally known as 180solutions, has been charged with installing advertising software along with its free games without proper notification to users and will be fined to the tune of $3 million. We're sure most of you recognize the name as it's estimated that the software was installed on over 7 million machines, causing around 6.9 billion pop-up ads. "The FTC also prohibited the company from installing software without a consumer's express consent, which it defined as "clear and prominent disclosure" of the terms of the software installation,... Read more...
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