Items tagged with Europe

In America, there's HughesNet. It's usually a last-resort for people seeking high-speed internet, mostly for two reasons. For one, it's crazy expensive. Two, it's really slow, at least on the uplink. But satellite-based internet is still useful in rural places where no other broadband is available, and evidently those same demands are also present in Europe. Eutelsat has just launched satellite internet across Europe, and it's being called the most powerful satellite in the entire world. It just went into service this week, giving broadband speeds to over a million homes in Europe that are currently doing without. The KA-SAT was launched at the end of 2010, and just now went into service. It's... Read more...
Thousands of homes and businesses across Europe and the Mediterranean will soon have access to satellite-based broadband thanks to the successful launch of Eutelsat's Ka-Sat from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Yahoo News reports. This is the third broadband satellite launched in six weeks and is based on the same technology used in the SkyTerra-1, which was launched last month to provide service service across North America. Ka-Sat launch video A remarkable piece of equipment, the Ka-Sat comes equipped with 80 spot beams, or focused signals designed to cover an area around a few hundred kilometers across. Each of those beams boasts an overall capacity of 900Mbps to be shared among all... Read more...
Satellite Internet has been provided in America for years via HughesNet. But elsewhere, it has been somewhat difficult to come by. Now, the first satellite dedicated to bringing satellite Internet to Europe has launched, as the Hylas-1 has flown off on an Ariane 5 rocket in order to offer service to up to 350,000 customers. The Hylas is hoping to cover dead spots in Europe, which are seen as remote locations where broadband isn't yet available. The rocket has just launched this week, so it will still be a few weeks before it is correctly positioned and queued for service. The UK government alone has poured £40m in the Hylas development program, and they currently have a commitment to provide... Read more...
After Microsoft's Kin project failed miserably, more and more pressure is being put on Windows Phone 7 to bring the company back into the smartphone game. Although the upcoming mobile OS has gotten a fair share of positive reports, one key question that remains is when we'll actually see the OS in action for ourselves. Microsoft has not given a definite timeframe as to when the phones will actually ship. That is, until now. During a recent presentation, Microsoft Chief Operating Officer Kevin Turner let information about the release of Windows Phone 7 slip. Turner said, "Now let's talk about phones.  This has been tough.  This is a lowlight.  For me, the company -- it's tough. ... Read more...
One charger to rule them all? That's the idea, at least. We have heard conversation back-and-forth over this matter for some time now, with certain entities feeling that a single charging standard for all mobile phones would benefit the consumer greatly. Of course, ideas such as these are always easier stated than accomplished, but there's nothing wrong with lofty goals. And as we have seen in the past, the European Commission usually gets what the European Commission wants. Case in point: these guys and girls felt that Microsoft had a leg-up on the competition in the Browser space, so they required all copies of Windows to include a Browser selection window. And so it was. Now, the European... Read more...
We still aren't sure we've warmed to the name "Cookie" for a phone line, but considering just how well the "Chocolate" line did for LG, we guess we can't blame them for continuing the tradition of naming their handsets after treats. The latest from the company might just be a serious contender in the smartphone space, with the Cookie Gig boasting formidable specifications and a mean look that will taken seriously by more than just tweens. It's being marketed now at the European market, but as with everything, a positive reaction could mean a global release in the future. The new Cookie gig KM570 is a music-centric phone with 4GB of built-in memory, a 3" WQVGA display, resistive touch-screen,... Read more...
According to the latest stats from web tracking firm Statcounter, Internet Explorer has been losing ground in Europe, including big markets like France, Britain, and Italy. Hardly surprising given the sanctions imposed on Redmond by the European Union to include a so-called browser ballot with Windows.So far in March, IE's web surfing share is down in France by 2.5 percent from one month prior, while shares are down 1.3 percentage points and 1 point in Italy and Britain, respectively."We have seen significant growth in the number of new Firefox users as a result of the Ballot Choice screen," Mozilla recently stated. "We expect these numbers to increase as the Ballot Choice screen fully rolls... Read more...
A ground-breaking event is about to occur in Europe, and it's probably not something that most will expect. It's not some sort of UFO landing or global climate pattern; instead, it's a move by Microsoft that could very well change the browser world forever. Awhile back, the European Commission found it unlawful for Microsoft to sell their operating systems with a single, pre-built-in Web browser. Basically, the EU argued that Microsoft wasn't giving consumers a choice in their Web browser, while no integrated document processors or A/V editing software was bundled (as an example). Microsoft has just announced that "internal testing of the choice screen is underway now," and that a limited roll-out... Read more...
LTE, or Long Term Evolution, isn't looking to be very "long term." The next generation mobile broadband protocol, or 4G, isn't even being deployed commercially yet, and already the European Commission is looking to spend some big bucks in order to research the next-next big things.Starting on New Year's Day 2010, the EU will release right around $25 million in order to research "ultra high-speed" mobile internet, which it hopes will act as the underpinning on the next generation of mobile services. Details are pretty vague about what it hopes to accomplish by doing this, but given the size of the investment, we suspect it's not just doing this on a whim. EU Telecoms Commissioner Viviane Reding... Read more...
It's already been made clear by Microsoft that Internet Explorer 8 can be uninstalled, or disabled, from Windows 7, which is due to launch on Oct. 22nd. However, the company is going still further in Europe, where it will not sell any versions of Windows 7 that contain IE. C|Net first uncovered the change, via a leaked memo. This is obviously a pre-emptive "strike" at E.U. regulators, who have looked askance at some of Microsoft's practices. In part, the memo, which has already been delivered to OEMs, said: "To ensure that Microsoft is in compliance with European law, Microsoft will be releasing a separate version of Windows 7 for distribution in Europe that will not include Windows Internet... Read more...
Man, Intel sure hasn't been shy about breaking out the checkbook of late. Just a few months after it allocated $7 billion for investments in chip plants, the company has decided to set aside another $12 million in order to create a Visual Computing Research Center in Europe. What for, you ask? To "explore advanced graphics and visual computing technologies."The facility opens up today at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, and we're told that the five year investment represents the company's largest European university collaboration. Intel goes on to explain that visual computing is the analysis, enhancement and display of visual information to create life-like, real-time experiences... Read more...
Intel Statement on Latest European Commission Action SANTA CLARA, Calif. – Intel Corporation today issued the following statement in response to allegations contained in the new Statement of Objections (SO) issued by the European Commission: We're naturally disappointed the Commission has decided to issue a new SO. The issuance of a second SO suggests that the Commission supports AMD's position that Intel should be prevented from competing fairly and offering price discounts which have resulted in lower prices for consumers. We will evaluate this newest SO and respond fully, but it's clear that the allegations stem from the same set of complaints that our competitor, AMD, has been making to regulators... Read more...
The EU's antitrust regulators launched a fresh offensive against Intel while still awaiting an official response from the company.  The newest round of raids encompasses Intel's offices in Munich as well as retailers in Germany, France and the U.K.  The raids were supposedly carried out in order to discover if Intel was using noncompetitive business practices to keep AMD down.Asked whether he was surprised that the European Commission had raided Intel in a new probe while still pursuing it on other charges, Craig Barrett said: "You have to ask the EU why they are expanding it at this stage."Barrett's comment might seem to indicate that this action taken by the European Commission is... Read more...
Once again, no one (except maybe cellular carriers and those supplying the content) should be surprised. Europeans' interest in watching mobile television is as tiny as cell phone screens, a new study showed on Monday, even though the industry has been buzzing about offering TV on handsets for years. Mobile operators hope that mobile TV could encourage users to spend an extra 5 to 10 euros a month, compensating for declining revenues from voice calls, but mobile television and video downloads ranked close to the bottom of consumer interest in a Gartner study in Europe. Honestly, why would anyone be surprised at a lack of interest in watching TV on a tiny screen?!  Or, more to the point,... Read more...
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