Items tagged with dx11

The product we’ll be featuring here today, the AMD Radeon HD 6990, should come as no surprise to anyone that even remotely stays on top of the PC graphics scene. News of the Radeon HD 6990’s arrival has been circulating for many months now, although back in the early days it was referred to by its codename—Antilles. Antilles was the codename given to the dual-Cayman GPU powered graphics card that would eventually top AMD’s graphics card line-up and supplant the Radeon HD 5970 that’s served the company so well, since its release way back in November of ’09. While news of Antilles development wasn’t really news at all, considering AMD’s GPU design... Read more...
The product we’ll be featuring here today, the AMD Radeon HD 6990, should come as no surprise to anyone that even remotely stays on top of the PC graphics scene. News of the Radeon HD 6990’s arrival has been circulating for many months now, although back in the early days it was referred to by its codename—Antilles. Antilles was the codename given to the dual-Cayman GPU powered graphics card that would eventually top AMD’s graphics card line-up and supplant the Radeon HD 5970 that’s served the company so well, since its release way back in November of ’09. While news of Antilles development wasn’t really news at all, considering AMD’s GPU design... Read more...
The product we’ll be looking at today is the MSI R6950 Twin Frozr III. As its name suggests, the R6950 Twin Frozr III is powered by AMD’s Radeon HD 6950 GPU and the card sports MSI’s third-generation Twin Frozr cooler. MSI did more with the R6950 Twin Frozr III than swap the reference cooler with one of their own design, however. The R6950 Twin Frozr III is outfitted with a custom PCB and has a couple of other interesting additions as well. Check out the specs below and then we’ll move on to some of the more juicy details, benchmarks, and some overclocking action... MSI R6950 Twin Frozr III Power Edition Review... Read more...
Over the last couple of years, MSI has made a concerted effort to bolster their reputation as a premiere brand in the PC enthusiast space. MSI’s motherboards, graphics cards, notebooks, and virtually every other high-profile product family in their repertoire has been revamped and updated in some way to differentiate them from the competition. Whether or not MSI’s efforts have paid off across the board is a matter of debate, but there’s little doubt that the company’s “Twin Frozr” line of graphics cards stand out from plain-vanilla reference cards. The product we’ll be looking at today is the MSI R6950 Twin Frozr III. As its name suggests, the R6950 Twin... Read more...
Much of the talk about AMD products has centered around Bulldozer of late, but Llano is on track for launch this year as well. AMD has released a new video pitting Llano against Intel's Sandy Bridge, with results that (un)surprisingly favor AMD's own solution. According to Godfrey Cheng, AMD's director of Client Technology, Llano was designed on the following hypothesis:  "People are using more modern workloads like 3D graphics, HD video and Internet surfing in a much more prevalent manner...we all dabble with spreadsheets and word processing...but any modern x86 CPU-based PC can handle these workloads with ease.  But with these modern applications, the capacity to multitask, improve... Read more...
If you’ve been on top of the graphics space the last few months, you’ll no doubt be aware that NVIDIA recently introduced the GeForce GTX 580 and 570, which feature the GF110 GPU; an updated version of the GF100 which arrived with the GeForce GTX 480. In a similar move, the GF114 GPU that powers the new GeForce GTX 560 Ti is a fresh take on the GF104, which debuted on the GeForce GTX 460 a few months back. We’ve got a couple of GeForce GTX 560 Ti cards in the lab, a reference model from NVIDIA and a factory overclocked speedster from MSI, the N560GTX-Ti Twin Frozr II. Strap yourself in and come along for the ride as we check out what will undoubtedly be a popular card with budget... Read more...
Titanium. It’s a lightweight, yet relatively strong metal that conjures up images of sleek airplanes or powerful spacecraft. It’s used in a multitude of different machines and tools, from the Boeing 777 to surgical implants, where high tensile strength, low weight, and strong resistance to corrosion and high temperatures are desired. To us computer geeks though, Titanium, or more specifically its chemical symbol ‘Ti’, takes us back almost a decade to the release of NVIDIA’s GeForce 4 Ti series of graphics cards with its whopping 128MB frame buffers and the flagship Ti 4600 model’s impressive 10.4GB/s of memory bandwidth. Wow, time sure flies when you’re... Read more...
We have been hearing rumblings about the products we’ll be showing you today, which are based on AMD’s next-gen “Cayman” GPU, for months now. In fact, back in October we were able to leak a tiny bit of official information in our coverage of the AMD Radeon HD 6800 series, but there’s been rampant discussion, spy images, and other leaks from all around the web for ages. And why not? It has been almost 15 months since AMD launched the Radeon HD 5870, which remains the company’s fastest single-GPU. That’s a freakin’ eternity in Internet time. As many of you may be aware, Cayman is the codename given to AMD’s newest flagship GPU, which will power... Read more...
As many of you may be aware, Cayman is the codename given to AMD’s newest flagship GPU, which will power the Radeon HD 6900 series (Antilles, aka the Radeon HD 6990, will uses a pair of Cayman GPUs when it arrives sometime next year). Cayman is the successor to the Cypress XT that was employed on the Radeon HD 5800 series, and while it does leverage many of the technologies from that generation, Cayman is a new chip that embraces a fresh core architecture designed to increase efficiency, performance and feature-set. Initially, the Cayman GPU will power two graphics cards, the Radeon HD 6970 and the Radeon HD 6950. And wouldn’t you know it; we have a pair of each in house and have... Read more...
Last week, Futuremark released the latest version of 3DMark.  We've taken the new benchmark for a spin using CPUs from Intel and AMD as well as GPUs from AMD and NVIDIA. The new version, dubbed 3DMark 11 (in reference to its level of DirectX support, not the upcoming year) includes a fresh set of tests, a game demo sequence, and measures CPU performance rather differently than its predecessor, 3DMark Vantage. We ran the benchmark through multiple tests, comparing it across AMD and Intel CPUs as well as AMD vs NVIDIA GPUs.... Read more...
Last week, Futuremark released the latest version of 3DMark.  We've taken the new benchmark for a spin using CPUs from Intel and AMD as well as GPUs from AMD and NVIDIA. The new version, dubbed 3DMark 11 (in reference to its level of DirectX support, not the upcoming year) includes a fresh set of tests, a game demo sequence, and measures CPU performance rather differently than its predecessor, 3DMark Vantage. 3DMark 11: Now with additional oceanic encrustations. We've run the benchmark through multiple tests, comparing it across AMD and Intel CPUs as well as AMD vs NVIDIA GPUs. According to Futuremark, 3DMK11 was designed meet four specific goals. These are: Produce consistent results that... Read more...
Hot on the heels of the arrival of their flagship GeForce GTX 580, NVIDIA is launching another new graphics card today, based on the GF110 GPU. As we’ve come to expect from NVIDIA, and AMD for that matter, when a new GPU arrives, derivatives based on pared down version of the chip typically get introduced at some point, but with somewhat lower specifications. Such is the case with the GeForce GTX 570 we’ll be showing you here today. It’s almost funny to say “somewhat lower specifications”, however, because the GeForce GTX 570 is one heck of a powerful graphics card, as you’ll see. We’ve got the full specifications outlined, followed by a complete set... Read more...
Hot on the heels of the arrival of their flagship GeForce GTX 580, NVIDIA is launching another new graphics card based on the GF110 GPU. As we’ve come to expect from NVIDIA, and AMD for that matter, when a new GPU arrives, derivatives based on pared-down version of the chip typically get introduced, but with somewhat lower specifications. Such is the case with the GeForce GTX 570 we’ll be showing you here today. It’s almost funny to say “somewhat lower specifications”, however, because the GeForce GTX 570 is one heck of a powerful graphics card, as you’ll see. We’ve got the full specifications outlined below, followed by a complete set of performance... Read more...
Even before the GF100 GPU-based GeForce GTX 480 officially arrived, a myriad of news reports and rumors swirled claiming the cards would be hot, loud, and consume a lot of power, not to mention, be late to market. Unfortunately for NVIDIA, in the end, all of those things ended up being true to some degree. In all fairness, the GeForce GTX 480 did end up being the fastest single-GPU available, and things have only gotten better with recent driver releases, but it’s no secret that the GeForce GTX 480 wasn’t everything NVIDIA had hoped it would be. Of course, NVIDIA knew that well before the first card ever hit a store shelf. And it turns out the company got to work on a revision of... Read more...
Futuremark hasn't told anyone when it plans to launch 3DMark 11, but the video and screenshots the company has released thus far point towards a gorgeous application. It's arguably timely; the three-year-old 3DMark Vantage doesn't support DirectX 11. This could probably be fixed via an update, the same way 3DMark 2005 was rebuilt as 3DMark 2006, but Futuremark apparently has enough changes in mind to justify a new program. These tidings are virtually guaranteed to kick off a fresh round of debate over whether or not 3DMark is a "real" test, or whether it deserves to be considered a benchmark at all. In addition to providing news of the actual video, we've decided to tackle this question. It's... Read more...
NVIDIA is launching a new entry-level graphics card today, the affordable GeForce GT 430. With the release of the GeForce GT 430, NVIDIA aims to better position itself in media PC market, where hardcore, high resolution PC gaming takes a backseat to things like HD video playback, photo and video editing, and Blu-ray 3D capability. Read on to find out just how well the new GeForce GT 430 performs, and where it stands in comparison to its AMD Radeon-based counterparts... NVIDIA GeForce GT 430: Cheap DX11 Graphics... Read more...
Throughout the third and fourth quarters of '09, and right through the beginning of this year, we watched as AMD launched graphics card after graphics card, until their full product line of DX11 Radeon HD 5000 series parts filled virtually every possible market segment. More recently, NVIDIA has had the chance to answer with a number of video cards of their own based on the company's Fermi architecture. Although it was released much later than NVIDIA would have liked, the current flagship GTX 480 ended up taking the crown as the fastest single GPU on the market. And since then, the GF104 based GeForce GTX 460 has made a strong statement as one of the best... Read more...
As its GTS moniker denotes, NVIDIA's new GeForce GTS 450 is targeted at the mainstream market. That card's reference specifications call for a 783MHz GPU clock, with 1566MHz CUDA cores, and 902MHz GDDR5 memory (3608MHz effective data rate). With those frequencies, stock GeFore GTS 450 cards offer 57.7GB/s of memory bandwidth with a 25.1GigaTexel/s textured fillrate. As is typically the case with mainstream NVIDIA GPU’s, however, board partners will be releasing cards clocked somewhat higher than the reference specifications recommend.  Along with a $129 (give or take) price tag, the GeForce GTS 450 is certainly more affordable than any other DX11-class GPU out there right now. Whether... Read more...
NVIDIA has just taken the wraps off an entire line-up of Fermi-based GeForce GT and GTX 400M mobile GPUs—seven in total---and revealed a number of notebook design wins from major OEMs using the GPUs. Like their desktop-targeted counterparts, the mobile GeForce GT and GTX 400M series GPUs leverage technology from NVIDIA’s Fermi architecture, which debuted in the GF100 GPU at the heart of the company’s flagship GeForce GTX 480. GeForce GT and GTX 400M series GPUs are DirectX 11 compatible and support all of NVIDIA’s “Graphics Plus” features, including PhysX, 3D Vision, CUDA, Verde drivers, and 3DTV Play. All of the GeForce GT and GTX 400M GPUs support NVIDIA’s... Read more...
A few weeks back, AMD quietly released a couple of new graphics cards in the Radeon HD 5500 series. For a while there, starting with the Radeon HD 5870 in late September of last year, it seemed like AMD was releasing a new series of graphics cards aimed at different price points, practically every few weeks. Things slowed down a bit once the company had a complete top-to-bottom line-up of DX11 and Eyefinity capable cards from prices ranging from about $49 to $600, but obviously AMD wasn’t quite done beefing up the Radeon HD 5000 series. The recently released Radeon HD 5500 series cards differed from their predecessors in only one meaningful way—they were equipped with GDDR5 memory.... Read more...
A few weeks back, AMD quietly released a couple of new graphics cards in the Radeon HD 5500 series. For a while there, starting with the Radeon HD 5870 in late September of last year, it seemed like AMD was releasing a new series of graphics cards aimed at different price points, practically every few weeks. Things slowed down a bit once the company had a complete top-to-bottom line-up of DX11 and Eyefinity capable cards from prices ranging from about $49 to $600, but obviously AMD wasn’t quite done beefing up the Radeon HD 5000 series. The recently released Radeon HD 5500 series cards differed from their predecessors in only one meaningful way—they were equipped with GDDR5 memory.... Read more...
Today, NVIDIA is unleashing another Fermi-architecture based graphics card, but unlike its predecessors, this one isn't based on the GF100 GPU. The GeForce GTX 460 we'll be showing you today is actually based on a new-class of Fermi-based GPU, the GF104. The GF104 borrows heavily from the GF100 design, but it features fewer CUDA cores and is pared down in a couple of other areas as well. In fact, it features over a billion fewer transistors than the GF100. Overall though, as you'll see on the pages ahead, the new GeForce GTX 460 is surprisingly potent given its relatively affordable price point and scaled down GPU... NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 Debut: ZOTAC, EVGA... Read more...
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next