Items tagged with 3D-printer

As we mentioned earlier today, Microsoft is really on board this whole 3D printing thing, loading Windows 8.1 with native 3D printing capabilities and working closely with MakerBot to develop a driver for the latter’s Replicator 2 3D printer, but that’s not all. Microsoft also now has an app called 3D Builder that lets users more easily set up a design for 3D printing. 3D Builder, which is available for free in the Windows Store starting today, lets users manipulate existing designs stashed in the app’s library or upload their own designs made in other applications. Features include the ability to scale, arrange, rotate, and adjust objects and even stack or push designs together... Read more...
When Microsoft announced its eagerly anticipated Windows 8.1 update, the company promised native 3D printing support. MakerBot worked with Microsoft to develop its own 3D printer driver for the MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D printer, which is now available via the Windows Update Service. The MakerBot 3D Printer Driver will enable users to print in 3D from within capable software applications just as you’d print any document. MakerBot CEO Bre Pettis said that the company worked closely with Microsoft to produce a driver that would be plug-and-play ready. It sounds like Microsoft got something out of it, too. “Working with MakerBot on creating the 3D printer driver has been a great... Read more...
Ultimaker is releasing its latest 3D printer, the Ultimaker 2, and the new machine features significant redesigns from the first iteration of the Ultimaker. The company says that the new version is more accurate, more efficient, and it’s even quieter at 49dB. Specifically, the Ultimaker 2 has a new CNC-milled case (that’s all white with glowing sidewalls) with an OLED display, and its glass and aluminum build platform is designed to cool quickly so you can peel completed projects off more easily. The Ultimaker 2 can print with multiple materials, including PLA, ABS, and PVA, and it’s WiFi-compatible so you can print from a mobile device or computer (so long as the printer is... Read more...
Back in April, botObjects sent word that it was developing a full-color 3D printer called the ProDesk3D, a device that would use a 5-color PLA cartridge to print mulitcolored items and offer a huge array of color options. At the time, there wasn’t apparently a working prototype, and preorders weren’t even available for two months hence. Fast forward a season, and botObjects does indeed have a working prototype, and the video of the thing in action is amazing. The FDM/PLA ProDesk3D can print at a 25 micron resolution with 1.75mm filament at 175mm/s, and botObjects now has translucent colors available, as well. Note the smooth transition between colors on the vase below. The ProDesk3D... Read more...
A company called AIO Robotics announced that it will be launching a Kickstarter campaign on September 4th to raise money for a 3D printer that also offers 3D “copying” (i.e., 3D scanning), and 3D faxing. (Yes, 3D faxing, as in you could “fax” someone a 3D file that would automatically print on their 3D printer. The use case on that seems quite narrow, although we suppose that if it’s perfected, it could have some benefit over time.) The printer may be given the name “Zeus”. More notable features of this prototype include that it will run on its own ARM-based onboard computer that you can navigate with a 7-inch touchscreen. Thus, it wouldn’t need... Read more...
How much would you pay for a desktop 3D scanner that let you recreate, via your 3D printer, anything that could fit on it small turntablet? MakerBot thinks you’ll be willing to cough up $1,400, plus another $150 for its MakerCare service and support program, to have a MakerBot Digitizer Desktop 3D Scanner on your desk. For hobbyists, that might be stretching it too much, for makers and designers, it sounds like a bargain--at the end of the day, the machine only costs as much as a well-appointed laptop. The Digitizer Desktop 3D Scanner works by using a camera and two lasers to capture a rotating object and creating a 3D file out of it using the included MakerWare software. It’s designed... Read more...
We’re seeing 3D printing incorporate itself into the mainstream rather quickly, from a sudden presence on Amazon, eBay, and Staples to driver support in Windows 8.1. The latest indication that 3D printing is the Next Big Thing is the fact that Microsoft is carving out space in its retail outlets to showcase MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D printers. 18 total Microsoft stores in states including California, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Texas, Virginia, and Washington are now offering a “MakerBot Experience” that lets customers see 3D printing in action. You can buy a Replicator 2 and the filament you need right... Read more...
Speaking of 3D printing, researchers at Harvard University have developed a 3D-printable battery that’s just 1mm wide; the tiny component will ostensibly be used to power computers and even robotic drones of commensurate size, from hearing aids to the (frankly, quite terrifying-sounding) Robobees that have also been developed at the university. The team built the tiny battery with a custom 3D printer and ink, according to Gigaom, with a nozzle that’s just 30 microns wide. As you can see in the brief video, the machine prints comb-like parts, using multiple layers of “nanoparticle-packed paste”; when two “combs” are interlocked, they form an electrode and can... Read more...
It was just this past autumn that MakerBot opened a 3D printing retail outlet, and the New York store was a first of its kind (a novelty, or a marvel) for those who are into this emerging technology. Staples also recently added Cube 3D printers to its inventory, and suddenly, things have gotten significantly more mainstream for 3D printing, as Amazon opened up a 3D printing section of its online megastore. The “3D Printers and Supplies”page is actually nestled under the Industrial & Scientific--> Additive Manufacturing Products subsection, but the whole area is dedicated to 3D printers, their parts and accessories, and print media. There are 29 printers in the stable as of... Read more...
Little Kaiba Gionfriddo was born with a condition where his bronchus would collapse and cut off airflow to his lungs. He would stop breathing from time to time, and eventually he was admitted to the hospital and diagnosed with tracheobronchomalacia. His parents were told that he had a low chance of survival. Baby Kaiba’s doctors reached out to doctors Glenn Greene and Scott Hollister at the University of Michigan, who were developing a 3D printed bioresorbable device that could save Kaiba’s life (and anyone else born with that particular affliction). The tiny tracheal splint essentially widens the bronchus and also provides support and stability so it doesn’t collapse. 3D-printed... Read more...
Last year, we caught wind of a one-man operation called Defense Distributed run by Texas law student Cody Wilson that was developing a 3D-printable handgun. At the time he was thwarted from prototyping the weapon as the company that leased him the necessary 3D printer, Stratasys, promptly reclaimed the printer. Even so, plans for 3D-printable gun parts such as ammunition magazines and receivers were proliferating online; 3D printer manufacturer Makerbot noticed this trend and purged all gun-related blueprints from its Thingiverse database. The Liberator - Image credit: Forbes In response to Makerbot’s takedown, an undeterred Wilson launched his own online repository for 3D-printable weaponry... Read more...
It’s a beautiful thing to watch a technology emerge before your very eyes, and that’s exactly what’s happening in the field of 3D printing. In fact, it was just recently that we first put any 3D printers on the test bench, and now you can buy the things at your local Staples store. Staples said today that it now offers the Cube 3D Printer from 3D Systems for sale on its website, and the printer will be available in a a few brick-and-mortar locations starting this June. The device will retail for $1,299.99 and features plug-and-play setup, Wi-Fi, 25 free 3D templates, and a small enough size that it can be used just as easily in large offices as in small homes. It also comes... Read more...
While even the ability to print small plastic tchotchkes in 3D with a large printer is still a bit of a marvel, a company called botObjects is attempting to take things a step further with the ProDesk3D printer, which is a full color 3D printer that can sit comfortably on your desk. What’s most notable about the ProDesk3D is that it uses a 5-color PLA cartridge, so users can specify a huge array of different colors for the object they’re creating. The ProDesk3D also features easy-to-use software designed to offer a user-friendly way to choose colors, tweak designs, and print objects, as well as automatic setup and build platform auto-leveling. It’s also a product with an attractive... Read more...
From the first time any of us saw a replicator on Star Trek, we’ve been dreaming of the day when we could just dial up whatever we wanted and watch it magically appear in front of us thanks to a powerful machine. We’re obviously a ways off from that reality even with the advent of 3D printing, but according to Gartner, 3D printing capabilities are going to skyrocket in the near future, even as prices drop. To put a number on it, the research firm believes that enterprise-class 3D printers will be available for a price tag under $2,000 within three years’ time. Still, it’s reasonably affordable even now. “The hype leads many people to think the technology is some... Read more...
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