Items tagged with 260

DRAM and storage-device maker Mushkin has announced their entry into the graphics card market with the release of no more than nine Nvidia-based graphics cards. The new graphics cards will be branded ultimateFX and start off with a very tame GTX 260 card, but work all the way up to a 2GB GeForce GTX285. Included are stock configurations to overclocked versions of each card.As everything Mushkin does, they like to keep things in special little wooden boxes they've trademarked as "WoodBox", which give the cards an upmarket packaging.The card list is as follows: Mushkin ultimateFX GeForce GTX260Mushkin ultimateFX GeForce GTX260 (1792MB)Mushkin ultimateFX GeForce GTX260 OCMushkin ultimateFX GeForce... Read more...
Today, we're going to take a look at an XFX version of the GTX 260 (Core 216) with their XFX GeForce GTX 260 (216) Black Edition.  The Black Editon takes the GeForce 260 (216) reference design to the next level by giving the GPU and Memory speeds a significant boost for added performance potential.  Along with its complete retail package, the XFX version of the GTX 260 (Core 216) is clearly out to make an impression, and from what we've seen, they are off to a good start.  ... Read more...
When first evaluated in June of 2008, we concluded that the GeForce GTX 260 and 280 series offered the most raw power of any gaming graphics cards available at that time.  This premium performance, however, came with a hefty price tag, making these models too costly to justify for some folks.  A week after their introduction, ATI unveiled the Radeon HD 4850 and 4870 which proved to be decent competitors to the GeForce GTX 260 while attempting to steal NVIDIA's thunder with a lower price as well.  Not to be outdone, NVIDIA quickly followed up by introducing price cuts of their own and upping the ante further with their next iteration of GTX 260, dubbed the GeForce GTX 260 (216). ... Read more...
In the conclusion of our coverage of the Radeon HD 4850 and 4870 launch, we posted this statement, "...dare we say a $300 graphics card represents an excellent value, from a price point perspective? These cards are definitely going to put significant price pressure on NVIDIA's GTX 200 series." At the time, the GeForce GTX 280 and GTX 260 were selling for upwards of $650 and $400 respectively, and ATI's newly released Radeon, which performed somewhat better than the GTX 260, was introduced at "only" $299.Of course, NVIDIA quickly responded with a hefty round of price cuts that brought the GTX 280's price down considerably and put the GTX 260 and Radeon HD 4870 on roughly equal footing, but it... Read more...
  In the conclusion of our coverage of the Radeon HD 4850 and 4870 launch, we made this statement, "...dare we say a $300 graphics card represents an excellent value, from a price point perspective? These cards are definitely going to put significant price pressure on NVIDIA's GTX 200 series." At the time, the GeForce GTX 280 and GTX 260 were selling for upwards of $650 and $400 respectively, and ATI's newly released Radeon, which performed somewhat better than the GTX 260, was introduced at "only" $299.Of course, NVIDIA quickly responded with a hefty round of price cuts that brought the GTX 280's price down considerably and put the GTX 260 and Radeon HD 4870 on roughly equal footing,... Read more...
NVIDIA has taken the wraps of their latest high-end GPU today and we've got complete coverage for your, from architecture to some impressive benchmark numbers we're sure you'll all enjoy. While the GT200 does borrow heavily from previous generation GPU architectures, it is simply in a class of its own at the moment.  And as you'll see, the jump in performance is similar to what we've all gotten use to and experienced again, when the GeForce 8800 GTX was first introduced.  The first two cards based on the GT200 GPU architecture are the GeForce GTX 280 and GeForce GTX 260.  As their names suggest, the GTX 260 is a pared down version of the flagship GTX 280.  And the GTX 280... Read more...
NVIDIA has held  a dominant position in the high-end GPU space ever since the introduction of the G80 architecture back in November of 2006.  When the G80 first arrived in the form of the GeForce 8800 GTX and the pared-down GeForce 8800 GTS, the cards were clearly superior to anything else at the time in terms of both performance and features.  As time has passed, rival ATI has closed the gap somewhat with the Radeon HD 3800 series, and has even surpassed NVIDIA in some ways, for example with  DX10.1 and native HDMI with audio support, but through it all NVIDIA offered enthusiast gamers what they arguably desired most - high performance.  And it shows in the discreet... Read more...
Today, while ATI/AMD still doesn't have a "GeForce killer", it does have a number of competent and competitive low, mid and high-end cards that often score high marks for those evaluating performance from a dollar-for-dollar perspective.  One such model is the Radeon HD 2600 XT.  In this article, we will assess another 2600 XT class card in the form of the MSI RX2600XT Diamond Plus, an aggressively clocked Radeon HD 2600 XT backed with 512MB of high-speed GDDR4. Here's a HotHardware look at the card's gaming performance with a number of quality titles known to stress even the strongest of graphics cards.... Read more...
Speed.  It's the one thing that gets all the attention when most folks consider performance computer hardware.  Whether we're referring to the CPU, Memory, Hard Drive or Graphics card, one of the most important characteristics we consider is its raw performance, wanting to know just how fast a component is compared to others in its category.  Perhaps a better question to ask is how fast does it need to be?  Case in point is the constants battle between NVIDIA and AMD/ATI for who has the fastest graphics card on the market. This time last year the Geforce 8800 GTX was the new top graphics card on the scene, trouncing on every competitor it was pitted against.  This was... Read more...
Just in case you hadn't noticed the new link at the top of the page, we wanted to let you know that w e've just posted a new article here at HotHardware in which we look at three mainstream video cards.  The first is the Sapphire HD 2400XT which is an ultra affordable video card with some solid features.  The next two models aim to deliver improved gaming performance while maintaining respectable price points that can appeal to a broader market, the Sapphire HD 2600Pro OC and the Sapphire HD 2600XT.  We take a look at each model's bundle, feature set, overclockability, and performance to see how they stack up to similarly priced competition... Sapphire Radeon HD... Read more...
A lot of attention is paid to framerates when discussing graphics hardware, and rightfully so.  Some argue that they are an outdated method for assessing a video card's performance, but when assessing a potential purchase, buyers need some way to determine why one card is superior to the other.  We can talk about how a card "feels" during gameplay, but framerates quantify that performance.  While framerates should not be your sole purpose for deciding on whether a particular graphics card is the right fit for your needs, they can be a useful tool for assessing the overall value of a product. Case in point, back when reviewing an ASUS EN8800GTX in December, the card churned through everything... Read more...
We’re writing to let you all know that we have just posted a new article here at HotHardware in which we evaluate the features, performance, and overclockability of the HIS Radeon HD 2600 Pro IceQ Turbo 512MB graphics card.  Like the other members of HIS’ IceQ Turbo family of graphics cards, this Radeon HD 2600 features an oversized, near silent cooler and it’s overclocked right out of the box.  Click the link below and see how it stacks up to a stock Radeon HD 2600 Pro and to a similarly priced GeForce 8600 GT...   HIS Radeon HD 2600 Pro IceQ Turbo 512MB... Read more...
If you have ever been in the market for a graphics card, you are undoubtedly familiar with the constantly changing graphics card market. About every 8-10 months, new GPUs are introduced by NVIDIA and ATI, and after their introduction, dozens of graphics cards built by their add in board partners come to market. Because these add in board partners all use the same graphics chips supplied by the two major graphics card companies, they have to use their marketing savvy to create extra value and incentive for consumers to buy their products. Over the years we’ve seen companies bundle the hottest new games, add new video connections, new cooling units, and even build their... Read more...
AMD Unleashes The ATI Radeon HD 2600 and ATI Radeon HD 2400 Series, Delivering DirectX 10 Graphics with Built-In High-Definition Video Processing SUNNYVALE, Calif. — June 28, 2007 — AMD (NYSE: AMD) today announced the arrival of the ATI Radeon HD 2600 and ATI Radeon HD 2400 series, the mid-range and entry-level graphics processors in the ATI Radeon HD 2000 series. These next-generation graphics processing units (GPU) bring premium support for Windows Vista with feature-rich DirectX 10 graphics, and built-in multimedia functions for an immersive HD video experience on the PC. Ranging from USD $89-$149 (SEP) for the ATI Radeon HD 2600 series and USD $50-$85... Read more...
At the time of the HD 2900 XT's debut, AMD disclosed a multitude of details regarding mobile and mainstream GPUs derived from the R600 architecture.  In our coverage of the Radeon HD 2000 series as it became known, we talked about not only the Radeon HD 2900 XT, but five other members of the family, including the Radeon HD 2600 XT (GDDR3 and GDDR4 versions), the 2600 Pro, and the Radeon HD 2400 XT and Pro.  Unfortunately, cards weren’t ready in time to launch alongside the 2900 XT, but they are now and we’ve got a trio of them in house for a benchmarking throw-down.  Click the link below and check them out… ATI Radeon HD 2600 XT, 2600 Pro,... Read more...
About six weeks ago, after an extended development cycle, AMD launched their latest flagship ATI-GPU based graphics card, the Radeon HD 2900 XT.  The Radeon HD 2900 XT is built around the company's unified, DirectX 10-class, R600 GPU and offers a number of key features over an above the older X1000 series of products, like new anti-aliasing modes and support for shader model 4.0. At the time of the HD 2900 XT's debut, AMD also disclosed a multitude of details regarding mobile and mainstream GPUs derived from the R600 architecture.  In our coverage of the Radeon HD 2000 series as it became known, we talked about not only the Radeon HD 2900 XT, but five other members of the family, including... Read more...
Last night in our Pre-Computex coverage, we saw that ASUS had some interesting looking displays set up at the front of their booth, but they were covered up and we weren’t able to take a close look at what was underneath.   Today, we were able to dig a little deeper into ASUS' booth, however, and hiding in one display was their new Crosslinx-enabled Republic of Gamers motherboards. Crosslinx is going to be featured on a couple of P35-based motherboards to enhance their PCI Express lane configurations for optimal performance in a multi-GPU configuration.                    At the heart... Read more...
Hey folks, just thought I'd stop in and give you something to read for Friday night. If this is your first visit of the day, Andrew has reviewed the ATI TV Wonder Elite, so check it out. As for other news, we have an article on Linux Gaming, a look at the AMD Sempron 2600+, and some pondering of the age old question... computers: to build or to buy ;) Enjoy! Linux Gaming @ HEXUS "Well, Linux certainly isn't most peoples' thought for a games-based PC. Especially one being taken to a big tournament LAN party. However, by design or trickery, none of the tournament games at the event were out-of-bounds to my Linux machine, and rousing games of Call of Duty, Quake 2 and Unreal Tournament 2004... Read more...
I have come to a realization today... I collect way too much computer related junk. All I was looking for was a CD-Rom drive, so I go into my closet to see what I have. I pull out a few boxes, and find 6 CD-Rom drives, 5 USB cables, 4 sound cards, 3 hard drives, 2 PSUs , and a partridge in a pair tree ;) There was of course much more, but there's also news to post... Sony VAIO VGN-A260 Laptop Review @ Designtechnica "We have to give Sony credit for designing a system that not only features a 15.4-inch widescreen display with Xbrite technology, but does it all in a chassis that is slimmer than the competition. We are on the fence about whether they should have gone with a desktop processor... Read more...
The AMD Athlon XP 2600+ The Thoroughbred Core Gets a Shot in the Arm... By, Marco Chiappetta August 21, 2002 It's hard to believe that it has been three years since the introduction of the first AMD Athlons.  To celebrate the occasion, AMD has unveiled two new processors in their Athlon XP lineup, the 2600+ and the 2400+.  The Athlon XP 2600+ is clocked at 2133MHz, and the 2400+ is clocked at an even 2GHz, making these two new processors the first AMD CPUs to officially break the 2GHz barrier.  The road to 2GHz was a rough one for AMD though.  They may have beaten Intel to the 1GHz mark in the Pentium III days, but with the release of the Pentium 4 Intel has been able to increase... Read more...