Items tagged with Adobe

Adobe has added support for Microsoft's puck-shaped Surface Dial accessory to Photoshop CC, the hugely popular photo editing program that is both feature-rich and at times complex. This is a big win for Microsoft, as app support for the Surface Dial has not exactly been robust to this point. It originally launched as a companion device to the Surface Studio all-in-one PC, but with Photoshop CC compatibility, the Surface Puck gains street cred, and a potentially bigger audience. "There is something magical about the combination of Surface Dial and Surface Pen. When you fold these capabilities in... Read more...
Are you guys ready to get rid of Flash? We here at HotHardware definitely are, and thankfully, Adobe has already seen the writing on the wall. Adobe gave us our first glimpse at the impending death of Flash back in late 2015 — we just didn’t think that it would take five years for the blood to finally drain from the plugin’ increasingly lifeless body. Adobe today confirmed that it will no longer distribute or update Flash by the close of the year 2020. Hopefully, the “true” demise of Flash will happen quickly after that point since there will be no security updates to protect users from the scores... Read more...
For over 13 years, Microsoft has been issuing monthly security updates for Windows on what is known as Patch Tuesday, typically the second Tuesday of every month. This month's update would have fell on Valentine's Day, except that Microsoft did something highly unusual—it delayed the Patch Tuesday rollout following the discovery of a "last minute issue that could impact some customers." Now a week later, Microsoft has issued an emergency patch for a flaw in Adobe Flash Player. The out-of-band release pertains to a critical vulnerability in Adobe Flash Player that could allow an attacker to execute... Read more...
Once again Google and Microsoft are at odds over the former's decision to disclose a zero-day vulnerability affecting the latter's Windows operating system. Google alerted both Adobe and Microsoft on October 21, 2016, of previously disclosed security flaws it discovered and in the time that has passed Adobe has issued patch (CVE-2016-7855) and Microsoft has not. Google's policy on zero-day and other critical vulnerabilities it believes are being actively exploited in the wild is to give software makers seven days to issue a patch or advisory. Once that time period elapses, Google discloses the... Read more...
Flash's days on the web are numbered. That's been evident for the past couple of years as the anti-Flash movement has gained steam. Little by little, software developers and online services have been removing Flash support from their products, and starting in August, you can count Firefox among them. Well, partially anyway. Firefox isn't getting rid of Flash altogether, but the browser will begin blocking certain Flash content that Mozilla feels is not essential to the user experience. The decision to crack down on Flash plugins is one of several things Mozilla has planned to ultimately bring Firefox... Read more...
At its annual WWDC conference being held this week in San Francisco, Apple announced that it would be transitioning its long-running Mac OS X to "macOS". Based on the initial screenshots we've been given, there's not going to be a large departure from what we're used to from OS X, but the move is still notable considering OS X has been the chosen name for 15 years. There's a lot of history there. Well, there's also going to be history made with macOS Sierra, as Safari 10 is going to be shipping with common 'legacy' plugins disabled by default. That of course includes Adobe's much-loathed Flash... Read more...
Adobe recently published a security advisory APSA16-03, which details a vulnerability in Adobe Flash Player version 21.0.0.242 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh, Linux, and Chrome OS. This comes after a patch for a zero day exploit was released in early April. Adobe believes the attackers are a group called “ScarCruft”. ScarCruft is a relatively recently APT group that has launched attacks in countries such as Russia, Nepal, South Korea, China, India, Kuwait, and Romania. The group recently has taken advantage of two Adobe Flash and one Microsoft Internet Explorer exploits. ScarCruft... Read more...
It seems as though most (if not all) Internet users are awaiting the day when Adobe Flash is finally eradicated from the face of the earth. The Adobe Flash Player plugin has long been a security liability, resource nightmare and battery hog (for mobile users). Although Adobe has announced that it is winding down the use of Flash in favor of HTML5 development, we still have to deal with critical exploits until judgment day arrives. Hence the company has rushed out an emergency patch for Adobe Flash player. According to Adobe, the most serious exploit, CVE-2016-1010, has already been “used in limited,... Read more...
Adobe acknowledged that it muffed an update to its Creative Cloud Desktop application last week, one that caused it to delete files on a "small number" of Mac systems. Once it became aware of the issue, Adobe pulled the plug on the update and has since made another one available for both Mac and Windows systems (there's no indication that the issue affects Windows PCs). "In a small number of cases, the updater may incorrectly remove some files from the system root directory with user writeable permissions. We have removed the update from distribution, and are in the process of deploying a new update... Read more...
2015 has proven to be a massive year for Adobe's Flash plugin, but for all the wrong reasons. Flash is already infamous for being one of the most vulnerable pieces of software on the planet, but in 2015, 316 bugs were found and squashed. That comes out to about 6 bugs per week for a piece of software that's used by the vast majority of notebook and desktop users. What's most impressive about the sheer number of bugs Flash has is the fact that ultimately, we're dealing with a mere plugin here, not a massive software package. While Flash was once considered "cool", a de facto choice for Web animation,... Read more...
As if Adobe's Flash Player needed another nail in its coffin, it nevertheless received yet another one this weekend from Facebook. The world's largest social playground announced that it recently flipped the switch over to HTML5 to be the default video player for videos on its website, and that includes the ones that appear in its News Feed. "From development velocity to accessibility features, HTML5 offers a lot of benefits. Moving to HTML5 best enables us to continue to innovate quickly and at scale, given Facebook’s large size and complex needs," Facebook stated in a blog post. You could see... Read more...
We’ve been saying it for years: Adobe needs to go ahead and kill Flash. Late Apple CEO Steve Jobs called for Flash’s demise five years ago and at the time, it seemed like an impossibility. But after a half decade of increasing security exploits and performance degradation in even the most powerful PCs, the Internet has quite effectively turned its back on Flash. Companies like Amazon, Google and Firefox have all given Flash the cold shoulder in recent months and the lapses in security show no signs of slowing down. Adobe has finally gotten the hint and is retiring the Flash brand. “Flash has played... Read more...
At this point, we are no longer surprised that Adobe Flash is being used as an easy vector to exploit computers and entire network. Back in the day, late Apple CEO Steve Jobs trashed Adobe Flash, calling it buggy, full of security holes and detrimental to the battery life of mobile devices. Five years later, Flash is still with us and it is still wreaking havoc on all three of those fronts.  The latest Flash vulnerability was revealed this week, and it affects ALL version of the software — yes, even version 19.0.0.207, which was released on Tuesday. The exploit, which is labeled CVE-2015-7645,... Read more...
The security gurus at Trend Micro believe that the cyber attackers behind Pawn Storm are performing their dirty deeds by way of a new zero-day vulnerability in none other than Adobe's Flash platform. Shocking that Flash is at the root of it all, isn't it? This is where we all feign surprise, sarcastically of course.In case you're not familiar, Pawn Storm is the name of a cyber espionage campaign that's had high profile targets in its sights. Trend Micro also says that Pawn Storm represents the first use of a Java zero-day that it's seen in the last couple of years, with the affected vulnerability... Read more...
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