Items tagged with RIAA

The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) has released its report on Digital Music 2009. According to the report (.PDF). It concludes that despite initiatives by the music industry, 95% of music downloads continue to be illegal. Yes, the IFPI, or as it's known, the global version of the RIAA, says that 40 billion songs were illegally downloaded in 2008, and the report goes on to state that:The debate has a huge way to go, but the campaign for ISPs to act as proper partners in helping protect intellectual property is making progress. Yes, they're talking about "three strikes rules" the E.U., France, and now the RIAA are considering / embracing. Nothing like really, really,... Read more...
According to a report today in the Wall Street Journal, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has decided to give up on its practice of mass lawsuits as a way to deter illegal file-sharing. Instead the industry is apparently going to use a "three strikes" policy, similar to that under consideration in the E.U. and France. The WSJ says that the RIAA is negotiating with ISPs over the "three strikes" policy. If the RIAA detects illegal file-sharing taking place, it will send an email to the ISP, and then:Depending on the agreement, the ISP will either forward the note to customers, or alert customers that they appear to be uploading music illegally, and ask them to stop. If the customers... Read more...
An interesting new conspiracy theory has arisen today. It appears that several laptop OEMs have been having "issues" with their sound card drivers: specifically, the Stereo Mix option is missing from their drivers, which basically means you can't record audio (except from Mic In). Whoops! Is this a case of Dell and others working with the RIAA? A ripten writer noticed this on his Dell laptop. Linkage between Dell (and other OEMs) and the RIAA were posited an obvious theory. Now, while we wouldn't put it past the RIAA to do this, we have what's probably a more likely theory: driver bug. Notably, these incidents seem to have occurred on laptops using a SigmaTel sound card. SigmaTel pretty much... Read more...
The lawsuits that the RIAA bring against illegal downloaders garner most of the attention paid to online music royalties, but suing grandmas and college kids is never really about the money; it's about discouraging many by suing a few. The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers, better known as ASCAP, took a more direct approach. They asked a court to establish a framework of payments to artists represented by ASCAP from three large online music services. A decision was recently handed down, and it's a doozy: AOL, Yahoo, and Real Networks might be on the hook for as much as $100 million dollars for offering ad-supported streaming music on their websites from as far back as 2002,... Read more...
It's a weekend, and a holiday weekend to boot, so the site might stay this way for some time. Someone apparently used SQL injection to wipe, and we do mean wipe, the RIAA's website clean of content.Apparently the RIAA is so busy suing consumers that they forgot to hire a decent programmer. With a simple SQL injection, all their propaganda has been successfully wiped from the site.It started out on the social news website Reddit, where a link to a really slow SQL query was posted. While the Reddit users were trying to kill the RIAA server, someone allegedly decided to up the ante and wipe the site’s entire database.Anyone have a backup?... Read more...
Not deterred by bad press, it seems that the RIAA is content to continue their latest campaign against piracy.Their latest group of lawsuits has included numerous institutes of higher education:“The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), on behalf of the major record companies, this week sent a new wave of 407 pre-litigation settlement letters to 18 universities nationwide as part of an ongoing campaign against online music theft. The letters reflect evidence of significant abuse of campus computer networks for the purpose of copyright infringement.”Strangely enough, it would seem that the University of Texas at Austin is the recipient of more settlement offers than any of the schools... Read more...
Let's all calm down, shall we? There are a lot of news reports about the RIAA suing Jeffery Howell for ripping copies of his legally purchased music CDs for his own use.  But according to engadget, that's not the case at all; he's being sued for the plain old-fashioned crime of participating in illegal downloading.As we're all unfortunately aware, that's pretty standard stuff; the big change from previous downloading cases is the RIAA's newfound aggressiveness in calling MP3s ripped from legally owned CDs "unauthorized copies" -- something it's been doing quietly for a while, but now it looks like the gloves are off. While there's a pretty good argument for the legality of ripping under... Read more...
Ripping CDs that you own for your personal use should be OK, right?  Not according to the RIAA.Now, in an unusual case in which an Arizona recipient of an RIAA letter has fought back in court rather than write a check to avoid hefty legal fees, the industry is taking its argument against music sharing one step further: In legal documents in its federal case against Jeffrey Howell, a Scottsdale, Ariz., man who kept a collection of about 2,000 music recordings on his personal computer, the industry maintains that it is illegal for someone who has legally purchased a CD to transfer that music into his computer.The industry's lawyer in the case, Ira Schwartz, argues in a brief filed earlier... Read more...
The recent RIAA victory in Capitol v. Thomas garnered a lot of media attention, and HotHardware was certainly no exception.  The end result of the case was that Jammie Thomas was ordered to pay $220,000 in damages.  After announcing she wouldn't appeal the ruling, she promptly reconsidered and filed for an appeal which has just been shot down:“In its reply to Thomas' motion, the RIAA argued that statutory damages need not have any relationship to actual damages. Furthermore, the group said that she had no basis to challenge the constitutionality of the damages since she had not objected to the jury instructions.The Department of Justice agrees. "This Court may find that defendant has... Read more...
By now just about everyone has heard of the RIAA and their law suits against people who have allegedly pirated music over the Internet.  The stories of the RIAA suing grandmothers, minors, and the deceased are common place, but it seems that the RIAA's latest step might have taken things too far: they're asking that a new law be passed that will require schools seeking federal funding for their programs and student body to police their own networks and keep them piracy-free.The request isn't unreasonable, and ought to be a goal of any IT staff at an organization where piracy is probable, but the repercussions of failure (not to mention what constitutes failure) could have a major impact... Read more...
Long before P2P networks, Usenet was a popular way to share binary files, besides of course, conversations.  What with the RIAA already targeting P2P networks, why should it forget the old standby?In a lawsuit filed on October 12, the RIAA says that Usenet newsgroups contain "millions of copyrighted sound recordings" in violation of federal law.Only Usenet.com is named as a defendant for now, but the same logic would let the RIAA sue hundreds of universities, Internet service providers, and other newsgroup archives. AT&T offers Usenet, as does Verizon, Stanford University and other companies including Giganews.That's what makes this lawsuit important. If the RIAA can win against Usenet.com,... Read more...
We just can't get enough of the recent story about the RIAA's recent victory over Janie Thomas of Minnesota, and we know you can't either.  It had everything from a defendant that told different and mutually exclusive stories while under oath (albeit she did so at seperate trials) to a rare-as-hen's-teeth guilty verdict in favor of the RIAA resulting a $220,000 fine that Thomas plans to appeal after saying she was going to pay it all by herself without asking for help.Now we're hearing that the $220,000 victory could have been a $3.6 million victory if two jurors had gotten their way.  Here's the math:“While some may feel the $9,250 per song fine levied against Thomas was extreme and... Read more...
For years there has been concern over just who has been using peer to peer networks that offer illicit copies of copyrighted material.  Not all of those concerns come from copyright holders or their agents.In fact it seems that there is, and has been, a large concern from those using P2P networks.  It might seem strange on the surface for alleged pirates to be worried about spies in their midst, but there are lots of people who claim to have reasons to want to use P2P networks that seem reasonable such as: backups for lost discs, etc.Here's the scoop:“For years, P2P communities have suspected that affiliates of the RIAA, the MPAA, and others have been haunting P2P networks to look for... Read more...
Minnesotan Jammie Thomas was recently found guilty of file-sharing and ordered to pay $220,000 in restitution, but has decided that she's going to appeal the verdict instead.  This probably isn't surprising considering the amount of the fine compared to her stated annual salary of $36,000 and because like everything in this case, it seems that Thomas changes her mind quite often.Case in point: less than 48 hours ago she stated in an interview that she wasn't going to ask for any financial support to pay the fine, but would gladly accept donations.Of course, depending on when she was asked about file sharing she claims that she either didn't own the drive in question at that time, or was... Read more...
The first RIAA court case against an accused "music downloader" begins today.  Jammie Thomas will become the first of 26,000 people who have been sued by the RIAA to have their case reach trial.  The rest of those sued have settled out of court.The Brainerd, Minn., resident is accused of illegally sharing 1,702 songs for free on a file-sharing network. Her trial offers the first chance for both sides in the debate over online music sharing to show a jury its version of the facts. Thomas is accused of violating the song owners' copyrights. Her lawyer says the record companies haven't even proved she shared the songs.Thomas was initially offered a $3,000 settlement.  Now she would... Read more...
RIAA Loses Another Case The good news is: The RIAA lawyers have lost another round in federal court, and they weren't even picking on dead people or grandmothers this time: "A federal judge has dismissed Elektra v. Santangelo with prejudice, leaving the door open for defendant Patti Santangelo to recover attorneys' fees from the RIAA. Last month, Judge Colleen McMahon denied the RIAA's motion to dismiss the case without prejudice, ruling that the case should either be dismissed with prejudice or proceed to trial so that Santangelo could have a shot at being exonerated of the RIAA's accusations of file-sharing and copyright infringement."... Read more...
We made that up. It's not a real award. But the RIAA has a webpage, written as if they were addressing Special Olympians, that explains how marvelous, hardworking and underpaid rock stars and record company executives are, and explains that the real price you  should be paying for a Celine Dion CD is $33.86 -- and I can't believe there is a webmaster skilled enough to keep this thing on the internet. In a USA Today article entitled, "Spending a Fortune for Fun: The cost of entertainment is rising along with our willingness to pay it ," the reporter observes, "though some factions of the industry see price resistance -- CD prices are relatively low and home videos rentals are... Read more...
The RIAA has launched a fresh wave of 8000 lawsuits against alleged file-sharers world wide. This brings the total to more than 18,000 in the US and another 13,000 world wide.  In this most recent wave 17 countries were affected, including Brazil, Poland, and Mexico which had previously avoided lawsuits.  The music industry claims they loose billions of dollars annually to music piracy and is determined to set an example by filing civil and criminal suits to stomp it out. To date approximately 2300 people have settled these suits in amounts averaging $3,000. LONDON (Reuters) - The music industry has launched a fresh wave... Read more...
Though the RIAA has filed lawsuits against thousands of people, many of the cases are settled out of court. Those who defend themselves have found mixed success fighting the RIAA, with results ranging from successfully winning their case, to loosing to the RIAA by default. In a recent case, the defendant has requested that their hard drive be examined by an independent party, much to the dismay of the RIAA. "As one might expect, Arellanes isn't too keen (PDF) on the idea of sending her hard drive to an RIAA star chamber for examination. Citing the RIAA's numerous missteps in its ill-conceived crusade against music fans, she requests that the... Read more...
Though the RIAA has been suing people over copyright infringement for a few years now, they've been starting to run into some roadblocks as of recent. Despite using such tactics as trying to sue deceased people, or even people without a computer, many of their lawsuits have been successful due to folks not wanting to fight the charges. A recent court battle has complicated matters for the RIAA though, as they've lost a case to an Oklahoma mother after they were unable to produce information concerning the number of songs downloaded, and the time of the downloads. This isn't the only suit giving them trouble though, more than a few people have decided to start fighting back.... Read more...
Prev 1 2