Items tagged with ORNL

AMD has definitely been on an serious upswing in recent years thanks to its Zen CPU microarchitecture, and the company has gotten the attention from some big names in the computing industry. Now, AMD is definitely showing its computing muscle thanks to a collaboration with the Cray, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).  It has been announced that AMD's EPYC processors will power what will be the world's fastest exascale supercomputer. Called Frontier, this new supercomputer will deliver in excess of 1.5 exaflops of compute performance and will be delivered to ORNL rough two years from now. Although AMD is currently being a bit light... Read more...
NVIDIA and IBM have helped the United States lay claim to the fastest supercomputer ever made. Called Summit, the remarkable machine sits at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where it is capable of crushing workloads via a staggering 200 petaflops of high-precision computation, making it eight times more powerful than Titan, previously the fastest supercomputer in the US. "Summit is fast, but what Summit means is even more remarkable," NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang said at Summit’s debut. "Summit is a magnificent scientific instrument that will attract the world’s great scientists...Summit is a milestone in a global race. Not a race to space, but a race... Read more...
The Titan supercomputer buildout at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was a much-publicized upgrade of the older Jaguar supercomputer that already existed on-site. Nvidia and AMD heavily publicized the facility's decision to combine Opteron processors with Nvidia's new K20/K20X-based graphics cards. When it launched the GTX Titan last month, Nvidia told us that one reason it settled on that name was because of the association with the Titan project. That deployment, it turns out, isn't working like it should. Stability problems have kept the supercomputer from passing final stability tests. The system needed to hit a 95% successful completion rate in a 14-day series of stress tests, but only managed... Read more...