Items tagged with Micron

Before long, you'll need a microscope to see the DIMM you're trying to install in your new gaming rig. Sure, we're exaggerating somewhat, but process technologies continue to shrink at a record rate. Micron has been making news lately with their advancements in NAND technology, and now the company has partnered with Nanya in order to unveil a new 42-nanometer DRAM process technology, with a 3X-nanometer process working in the lab.As you would expect, the new 42-nanometer process uses the more efficient and reliable copper metallization technology, and this device can produce a 2Gb memory module that provides lower power, higher-performance, greater density and smaller die sizes. In plain terms,... Read more...
Our weekly video podcast with our friends at TechVi returns after a short CES-induced hiatus as we talk about some of the latest developments in the world of technology. In this show, we cover Intel and Micron's joint 25nm NAND Flash announcement, Alienware's new M11x tiny gaming notebook, the iPad, and the upcoming NVIDIA GF100. Show Notes: 0:16 — Intel and Micron Unveil 25nm NAND Flash 2:12 — Dell Alienware Diana Team Continues M11x Tease Tour 3:41 — iPad's Identity Crisis and Apple's A4 CPU Showstopper 7:03 — NVIDIA GF100 Architecture and Feature Preview 8:33 — Win a new rig from HotHardware... Read more...
IM Flash Technologies is a joint venture between Intel and Micron which produces NAND flash memory. With a focus on research and development, IMFT has doubled NAND density approximately every 18 months. In 2006, they started production with a 50nm process, then moved to a 40nm process in 2008. This inevitably leads to smaller, more affordable products featuring higher capacities, much like we have witnessed in the SSD market and among USB drives the past couple of years. February 1, 2010 marks the official announcement of 25 nanometer NAND technology--a major advancement for the company. Intel and Micron now lay claim to the smallest production ready semiconductor process technology in the industry.... Read more...
IM Flash Technologies is a joint venture between Intel and Micron that is targeted for producing NAND flash memory. With a focus on research and development, IMFT has doubled NAND density approximately every 18 months. In 2006, they started production with a 50nm process, then moved to a 40nm process in 2008. This co-development inevitably lead to smaller, more affordable NAND flash-based products featuring higher capacities, much like we have witnessed in the SSD market and with USB flash drives over the past couple of years.  February 1, 2010 will mark the official announcement of IMFT's 25 nanometer NAND technology--a major advancement for the company. Intel and Micron now lay... Read more...
Micron's no stranger to the world of flash memory, but it looks like the company is dead-set on going head-to-head with the Seagates and Western Digitals of the world. The new RealSSD C300 solid state drive is reportedly the first to deliver native SATA 6GB/s performance, which should mean that it does great in the benchmarks that are sure to come. The drive is based on 34nm MLC NAND flash and supports the high-speed ONFI 2.1 standard. It'll be available in 1.8" and 2.5" form factors, with both supporting 128GB and 256GB. Pricing has yet to be made known, but both should ship in Q1 of 2010. Rest assured we'll be doing everything we can to get one in the lab! Micron RealSSD™ C300 Solid-State... Read more...
For many, it's not difficult to remember back when USB flash drives topped out at around 8GB and demanded a near fortune. Today, these minuscule drives are near ubiquitous, and with flash prices in free fall, a rather sizable one (capacity wise, not size wise) can be had for not too much dough.But, even big corporations like Intel and Micron know that 128GB in your pocket just isn't enough for some (or even 256GB), so we're not surprised to hear that the two have joined together in order to spearhead development in the realm and pave the way for 1TB+ flash drives. Specifically, the duo today announced the development of a new 3-bit-per-cell (3bpc) multi-level cell (MLC) NAND technology, which... Read more...
You've heard of memory, and you've heard of RAM. Heck, you may even know a thing or two about DIMMs. But have you any knowledge whatsoever on LRDIMMs? Those very modules are being unveiled today courtesy of Micron Technology, which has introduced the industry’s first DDR3 load-reduced, dual-inline memory module (LRDIMM). In short, these reduce the load on he server memory bus, thereby providing the option to support higher data frequencies and significantly increase memory capacity.If you're looking for the "wow-factor," here goes: the server memory module triples memory capacity and increases performance by 57%. We're not sure about you, but 57% sure sounds significant to us. The new LRDIMMs... Read more...
Micron Technology announced the mass production of new NAND flash memory products using a 34-nanometer process technology. In coordination with the announcement, Lexar, a subsidiary of Micron, announced plans to take advantage of the new 34nm NAND products by offering a range of flash memory cards and USB flash drives that use the technology.Micron’s newly architected 32Gb multi-level cell (MLC) NAND chip is 17% smaller than the company’s first-generation 32Gb chip. Micron plans to offer 16- and 32-Gb NAND chips. The 16Gb MLC NAND provides lots of storage in a tiny package that’s just 84mm. Both of Micron’s new products feature an interface that delivers transfer speeds up to 200MBps. By comparison,... Read more...
Samsung just got done wowing us with a memory announcement of its own, and now Micron is dashing in to ensure that it too receives a bit of RAM attention this week. Catering to performance-oriented notebook users, Micron has announced that users can now take advantage of optimized battery life and portability with a new line of low-voltage, high-bandwidth DDR3 memory module.The new module--which is shipping now in 2GB and will ship in 4GB this fall--aim to operate in a power efficient manner while providing the stability and performance that users have come to expect from the Micron brand. The modules are designed using the industry’s lowest 1.35-volt 1-gigabit (Gb) DDR3 components, allowing... Read more...
With Mobile World Congress just around the corner, not to mention rival SanDisk pumping out a few self-flattering press releases regarding NAND memory earlier this week, Micron has dropped a bomb of new information in the mobile memory space.For starters, Micron is introducing a suite of NAND software solutions for mobile handset designers looking to simplify the development process of NAND technology into their applications. NANDcode supports all major mobile operating systems including Windows Mobile 6, Linux and Symbian (though there's no mention of Apple's OS X and Google's Android systems), and is "optimized to derive the greatest benefit and full feature set of Micron's ONFI-standard SLC... Read more...
When it comes to memory technologies, there are a few major names in the industry that are essentially the primary sources of the chip-level technologies that drive the market.  When it comes to DRAM and Flash memory, Samsung, Intel and of course Micron, are a few of the big names.  Lately, though DRAM technologies have taken a sleepy development curve, Flash memory for SATA-based Solid State Disk technologies, has been on fire. Recently we showed you what Intel's new X25 series of SSDs could do and without question, they're some of the fastest SATA Solid State Disks on the market.  In addition, there are various incarnations of Samsung's SSD product on... Read more...
Solid-state memory is the future. Micron and Intel, working together, have brought us closer to that future with the announcement of  a new flash  memory architecture that more than doubles both read and write speeds for solid-state memory devices.IM Flash Technologies, a joint venture between Intel and Micron, has developed an 8G-bit SLC (single-level cell) high-speed NAND chip which can reach read speeds up to 200M bytes per second and write speeds of up to 100M bytes per second, which could mean faster data transfer between devices like solid-state drives and video cards."With the popularity of digital video cameras and video-on-demand services, high speed NAND can enable a high-definition... Read more...
It is no secret that Advanced Micro Devices hasn't had the best couple of quarters, but they seem to have a very deep strategy for getting back in black.  Obviously that strategy includes excellent new products such as the Radeon HD 3000 series and the Phenom CPUs and chipsets, but that's only part of the picture.Apparently AMD has entered into a deal with Russian tech firm Angstrem to provide them with the technology and know-how necessary to fabricate chips using the now 'old' 130 nm process.“On November 22nd at a press conference Pierre Brunswick, AMD Sales and Marketing Vice President in Russia, disclosed some of the company's plans regarding the equipment and technology supply to Zelenograd... Read more...
According to a story on EETimes, rumors were circulating last week that claimed AMD and Micron (among others) were planning to go private. We don't know how much truth there is to this rumor, but considering AMD's current financial situation, it's likely the company is exploring a number of possible routes and going private is just one of their options.  "Rumors are running rampant that AMD, Micron and Lexmark are separately mulling over plans to go the private-equity route, according to various reports. There were other rumors last week. Oracle was rumored to make a bid for SAP, Nokia would make a bid to buy Research in Motion, and Tokyo Electron Ltd. (TEL) would buy Lam Research... Read more...
Intel and Micron Announce Advancements in NAND Flash Memory Joint Venture SANTA CLARA, Calif., and BOISE, Idaho, Nov. 6, 2006 - Intel Corporation and Micron Technology Inc., today announced they are ahead of schedule on their development of the NAND flash memory joint venture, IM Flash Technologies. Since the formation of IM Flash in January, the companies have brought online a state-of-the-art 300 millimeter (mm) NAND fabrication facility in Manassas, Virginia, and a Lehi, Utah, 300mm facility is on track to be in production early next year. The venture also currently produces NAND memory through existing capacity at Micron's Boise, Idaho, fabrication facilities.  READ MORE...... Read more...
With shrinking feature sizes, smaller and smaller form factor devices are coming to market. Imagine this little image processor coupled with bluetooth embedded in such devices as key chains, pens and other small form factor devices. James Bond would have a ball with this type of technology. I wonder what the power requirements will be? The new Micron image sensor (product number MT9M019) captures 30 frames per second (fps) at full 1.3-megapixel resolution (1,280 by 1,024 pixels) or 60 fps at VGA resolution (640 by 480 pixels), allowing for high-quality, seamless video. Additionally, another critical design factor is its small 1/5-inch form factor, allowing it to fit into applications requiring... Read more...
Intel and Micron Sample Industry's First 50 Nanometer NAND Flash Memory Devices BOISE, Idaho, and SANTA CLARA, Calif., July 25, 2006 - Demonstrating their commitment to move quickly up the technology leadership curve, Micron Technology, Inc., and Intel Corporation today announced they are sampling the industry's first NAND flash memory built on industry-leading 50 nanometer (nm) process technology. The samples were manufactured through IM Flash Technologies, a joint development and manufacturing venture from Micron and Intel. Both companies are sampling 4 gigabit (Gb) devices now, with plans to mass produce a range of densities on the 50nm node in 2007. This move to 50nm process technology... Read more...
Good Afternoon HotHardware fans! Just in case you didn't see the link at the top of the page, I'm here to let you know that we've just posted a new article investigating the overclocking potential, thermals, and power consumption of AMD's .09 micron, Winchester core based Athlon 64 3500 processor. Our results were fairly interesting. Click here and see what we found out...... Read more...
When Intel released the first batch of Pentium 4 processors based on their Prescott core, which were built using a .09 micron manufacturing process, analysts found that the CPUs generated more heat and consumed more power than similarly clocked Pentium 4 processors based on the .13 micron Northwood core. These findings flew in the face of tradition, as a die shrink usually yielded processors that would run at higher clock speeds and consume less power. But the Prescott core wasn't a simple die-shrunk Northwood.  The Prescott architecture consists of millions of more transistors than Northwood and it has a deeper pipeline. The combination of building a new core on a relatively new and unproven... Read more...
Prev 1 2 3 4 5