Items tagged with Legal

Apple and Qualcomm are continuing to fight it out in court over patents and the huge sums of money that go along with licensing them for use in mobile devices today. The most recent turn of events in the Qualcomm vs. Apple case in courts right now came this week when U.S. Magistrate Judge Nathanael Cousins hit Apple with sanctions for being slow in turning over documents that were requested in the FTC’s lawsuit against Qualcomm. The lawsuit accuses Qualcomm Inc. of forcing Apple to use its chips exclusively inside devices like the iPhone and iPad. The judge in the case has hit Apple with a fine of $25,000 per day for each day that it fails to produce the evidence requested, starting on... Read more...
Uber has been on an incredible losing streak over the past year; granted much of its troubles have been at its own hands with scandal after scandal. The most recent of those scandals started with an ex-employee who sent a letter detailing all the hacking and bribery that Uber has allegedly engaged in over the years. The latest setback came as the European Union's highest court ruled that Uber is a taxi service. That means that Uber will now have to comply with tougher rules within the European Union that govern taxi associations. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons (Dllu) The ruling was handed down by the European Court of Justice, the highest court in the Union, and the ruling made it clear that... Read more...
Uber has been in hot water over the last few months for some very unsavory allegations. Among them was that Uber was hacked resulting in the data of 57 million customers being stolen. The company allegedly paid the hacker $100,000 to delete the data. The latest issue stems from a 37-page letter that Ric Jacobs, a former member of the Uber security team, sent to management earlier this year detailing all the shady things the company has done over the years. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons (Dllu) Until this week, only portions of the letter, called the Jacobs Letter, had been revealed, but now a redacted copy of the letter is part of the litigation between Uber and Waymo. The letter claims that... Read more...
The net neutrality debate is hard upon us, but not everyone understands what's at stake. Most tech-savvy folks understand the issues and have a thoughtful position based on their understanding of the technology and how it's used. But some have no position, mainly because they simply don't follow the tech press on a daily basis. This may be especially true when we're speaking of folks who are somewhat older or younger, or who simply don't have a tech background. The following is provided mostly as a resource for those folks. We have always had an "open Internet." In the old days (i.e., the early 2000s), we thought of the Web as an "information superhighway," and that was an apt analogy: the Internet... Read more...
Apple and Qualcomm are battling in court right now over alleged patent infringement. The legal war shows no signs of letting up as Apple this week countersued Qualcomm, alleging that it was infringing on Apple patents. Qualcomm has now pulled out some old Palm patents in an attempt to get the ITC to ban Apple's fresh iPhone 8 and iPhone X. Qualcomm filed the complaint in the U.S. district Court for the Southern District of California and alleges that Apple is infringing on five patents, with four of them originating from Palm. That other patent is from a patent portfolio that was previously owned by TouchTable. The patents include U.S. Patent Nos. 8,683,362, 8,497,928, 7,844,037 and 9,203,940.... Read more...
Apple has found itself the target of a raid by South Korean authorities on the day before the iPhone X was due to launch in the country. Apple's headquarters in the country was raided, with investigators looking for information on Apple's business practices. South Korea isn’t known as the friendliest of countries when it comes to foreign companies in the smartphone realm. The raid is sure to have some wondering if the real goal here was to try and dampen the success of the iPhone X launch. That smartphone has been selling extremely well globally and will put pressure on South Korean-native firms Samsung and LG. Apple and the South Korean Fair Trade commission have a history of butting heads... Read more...
In December 2015, a man in San Bernadino, California and his wife participated in a terrorist attack that left 14 people dead. In the wake of that attack, the FBI opened an investigation into the couple and ties to other potential terrorists living within the US. An iPhone 5C was discovered that belonged to one of the terrorists, and the FBI wanted Apple to create a tool that would bypass the security on the iPhone in question and allow law enforcement into the device to look for leads and other evidence. Apple refused to help the FBI develop a backdoor into the device leading the Justice Department to file a suit against Apple to force the company to participate in the investigation. However,... Read more...
Nintendo has been fighting a legal battle in Texas against a company called iLife since 2013. The patent infringement case brought forth by iLife involves Nintendo's use of its patented technology in the Wii controller. When iLife originally filed a patent on the tech, the company had no thought of using the technology in video games. iLife originally devised its technology to detect when the elderly people had fallen and to monitor babies to prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The suit sought a massive $144 million in damages, working out to $4 for every Wii game system sold. Nintendo sold about 36 million Wiis. iLife also wanted an injunction that would prevent Nintendo from using its... Read more...
Sony made a number of smartphones and tablets that it claimed were water resistant and could survive rain and spills without damage. There was only one problem though; Sony didn't do ta great job making the devices water resistant. When customers initiated warranty claims citing water damage, Sony didn't do much to help them, which resulted in a class action lawsuit against the electronics maker. That class action suit is now wrapping up and owners of certain affected devices can get up to 50 percent refund on the purchase price of the smartphone. There are 24 Sony smartphone models in the suit, all advertised with having water resistant IP ratings. These are the devices included in the suit:... Read more...
Anyone who watched Saturday morning TV back in the late '80s will remember the KitKat commercials that flooded the airwaves. The commercial that most sticks out from that period is the one with the dude balancing all the things on his head as the "Give Me A Break" song plays. KitKat might be crispy, creamy and meant for sharing but Nestle, the maker of KitKat, has landed in hot water with Atari for using the look, feel, and name of a classic Atari game without permission. Atari has filed a suit that accuses Nestle of knowingly exploiting the look and feel of the 1970s game Breakout. This was one of the most frustrating games for many gamers of the era, involving controls with spinning knobs on... Read more...
With the boom of cryptocurrencies, many geeks have flocked to the virtual mining of Bitcoin and Ethereum. The boom in Ethereum mining recently was so massive that it was hard for gamers to find AMD Radeon graphics cards for gaming PCs because so many Ethereum speculators had gobbled up all the cards on the market. Even the co-founder of Ethereum, Charles Hoskinson, has said that cryptocurrency ICOs (initial coin offerings) are a "ticking time bomb." Part of the issue with these ICOs, which often drawn large sums of money very quickly, according to Hoskinson is that they are unregulated and sidestep safeguards required in traditional securities trading. Brad Garlinghouse, the CEO of money-transfer... Read more...
Fire-prone batteries are nothing new when it come to electronics. Roughly a decade ago, Sony-manufactured batteries were under the microscope for defects. More recently, Samsung found itself forced to issue multiple recalls on its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone due to defective batteries causing fires. In that case, Samsung eventually fingered the "irregularly sized" battery inside the smartphone as the culprit. Apple has stayed clear of any major battery issues with its iPhone line until now. A suit has been filed against Apple by State Farm insurance company and Wisconsin resident Xai Thao. Thao was a State Farm customer and according to the lawsuit, a defective iPhone 4S "failed" and "started a... Read more...
Take-Two clearly doesn't look at the modding scene with the same love as many of its peers. The Grand Theft Auto series has had a rich modding community for years, with its creative fans adding an incredible amount of content to Rockstar's most important series. Sometimes, even new mechanics are added. While most people who pick up the latest GTA don't even have modding on their mind, there are some others who buy the game with only modding in mind. That says a lot not just about modding, but about what a great base for such mods Grand Theft Auto is. And that's despite the fact that the games are in no shape or form designed to support modding.... Read more...
The folks at Kaspersky, one of the biggest antivirus companies on the planet, are not too pleased with Microsoft's recent Windows design cues. Last year, the company filed a complaint against the Redmond company with Russia's Federal Antimonopoly Service (FAS), and recently, it did the same thing in Europe. Any mention of Windows and "monopoly" make this complaint easy to figure out without even looking at it. Kaspersky has a beef with how Microsoft promotes the use of its Defender antivirus / anti-malware app over third-party solutions. One issue in particular is how Windows acts as a bit of a roadblock when a third-party antivirus application is installed, giving a modest warning of "You should... Read more...
If you've been drinking, it's not outside the realm of possibility to believe that you might gain a hankering for some Tostitos. Apparently, the company understands this demographic well, as it decided to integrate a breathalyzer into a special edition bag of chips that aims to tell those who might think about driving home after watching the Super Bowl to shelve the idea. The only downside is that this special edition bag was only sent out to media and other VIPs, and is not intended for a commercial release. With a sensor placed in the bag, alcohol detected on your breath will light up a steering wheel graphic, as well as the words "Don't Drink And Drive". Bonus: an Uber code will... Read more...
Given the fact that Apple is one of the biggest companies on the planet, it's sometimes easy to get impression that the company is unstoppable and can't be touched. In terms of sales, that might be true for now, but in legal matters, being a Goliath means very little and often times you're a target. This latest case is a perfect example, and while Apple won't face time clinging to steel bars or picking up rubbish around a park, it is required to open its wallet ever-so-slightly to pull out $302.4 million in chump change to pay VirnetX Holding Corp for infringing on two of its patents. The infringements are tied to Apple's FaceTime calling feature, which lets users see who they're talking to,... Read more...
As much as some companies would love to ignore the issue, sexism in the workplace is a serious problem, and no company is devoid of it by default. Even Apple, one of the world's largest and richest companies, has sexism running through its veins. In an article over at Mic, a group of women and some men who worked or work at Apple were interviewed about their experiences. This comes hot on the heels of a complaint that was filed against Apple last month, which claims the company isn't doing enough (or anything) about sexism in the workplace, especially with regards to leadership positions. Some of the accounts are downright disgusting by most measures. Flickr: Michael Wyszomierski The biggest... Read more...
Tired of reading about the FBI and Apple trading blows over an encrypted iPhone yet?  Well relief may be in sight.  This evening, the FBI filed a request to delay Tuesday's court hearing on the matter, and now that request has been accepted by U.S. Magistrate Judge Sheri Pym. Why has the FBI suddenly changed course?  According to the brief, the FBI has not stopped working on trying to access the data on Syed Farook's government issued iPhone 5C.  They state that an "outside party" demonstrated a possible method for unlocking the phone on Sunday, March 20th, sparking this about face.  The FBI has previously stated that they have exhausted all other known options. This... Read more...
If you've ever been late on paying a bill, it's unlikely that you ever thought that you were running the risk of being publicly shamed about your shortcomings. That said, whether you're late for a good reason or not, business is business, and your business with a service provider is generally intended to be kept private and not loosely for public knowledge.  However, for a few unfortunate individuals, one Canadian cable TV provider doesn't see things quite the same way. Recently, Senga Services, which is located in Canada's Northwest Territories, decided to begin posting the names of customers that had overdue payments to its Facebook page. As some of these late payments started at... Read more...
It might have once sounded like a pipe dream, but more than one company is trying to convince us that hoverboards are going to be a thing of the future. Last year, a company called Hendo hit the Web in a big way with a prototype that looks just as cool as we'd hope. This past August, a few months in advance of "Back to the Future Day", Lexus showed off its own prototype, one that arguably looks quite a bit better than Hendo's. It's important to note that neither of the boards we've seen up to this point are consistent with the kind of hoverboard we saw in Back to the Future 2, where they could be used on any surface - water or pavement proves no problem. Instead, magnetic fields are required,... Read more...
YouTube is an amazing service for a huge number of reasons, but if there's one thing that's not fun about it, it's the ever-existing threat of a company taking legal action against you because of a video upload. We see this happen all of the time, and often, users don't even know what they're actually allowed to upload. Uploading a song or parody, for example, is a hit-or-miss endeavor: you may get away with it or simply have the company monetize it on its own; or, if you catch a particular company on a bad day, you may wake up to a disabled video and a hit against your account. Some might argue that anyone who uploads a video should know whether or not they're allowed to, but as we've seen in... Read more...
As the years pass, our lives continue to become intertwined even more with the Internet. Today, the Internet acts as a backbone to critical infrastructure, and much like the risk of someone exploiting a flaw to break into our home PC, a real risk exists that enemies of the government could break into and cause harm to utilities. It's for that reason that all governments are overdue on penning up agreements with friendly countries to lessen the chance of a cyberattack. Nonetheless, it's being reported that President Obama is going to be taking some important steps in this when he meets with Chinese resident Xi Jinping during a state visit. These are going to be early discussions,... Read more...
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