Items tagged with Lawsuit

As the end of the year draws near, it seems that we're starting to (finally) see some grace from the lawyers at Apple and Samsung. As the two were deadlocked in heated trials throughout the year, recently they've caved a bit in what feels like joint efforts to simply move on. Live and let live, as it were. Now, Apple has decided to drop patent claims against Samsung's Galaxy S III Mini -- a high-end phone that bears the Galaxy name that Apple so detests. Of course, it's not just because Apple is feeling completely peachy. The move came after Samsung made clear that it had no intention to sell the diminutive handset on U.S. shores, which is clearly the market Apple cares about most in the patent... Read more...
One has to wonder what the technology universe would feel like if Apple and Samsung weren't at each other's throats. For months now, we've just seen the two tech titans battling like no other in courtrooms all across the globe, largely bitter of patents and who infringed on who. But all told, it's all rather boring. For consumers, it's all just noise that's impeding innovation on both fronts, and that's no good for anyone. Thankfully, it seems that with the end of the year coming up, the two are inching closer to putting all of this aside. Just this week, Samsung decided to cease its efforts to block sales of Apple products in Europe. Earlier still, a U.S. judge rejected Apple's request to outright... Read more...
You rarely hear politicians talk about patent reform, but perhaps it's high time the topic merits some discussion. The alternative is to leave the system alone and let businesses pay the price, even if they can't afford it. According to researchers at Boston University School of Law, the cost for businesses paying royalties to patent owners has risen fourfold since 2005, and it's the so-called "patent trolls" that are running the system. The study found that companies in 2011 paid a cumulative $29 billion in expenses associated with nearly 6,000 infringement claims filed by non-practicing patent owners using their IP portfolios solely to collect cash rather than build products. In 2005, there... Read more...
Blizzard has been hit with a lawsuit over its $6.50 Battle.net Authenticator keychains that it sells online. According to the lawsuit, Blizzard makes millions of dollars by "deceptively and unfairly" charging customers for an after-sale security product, essentially shifting responsibility from the publisher to the consumer to protect their accounts from hackers. Even then, it doesn't always work, the lawsuit claims. "Most recently, on or about May 19, 2012, reports proliferated that class members' Battle.net accounts had suffered a security breach ('hack') at the hands of unknown parties ('hackers'), and on or about August 4, 2012, hackers massively breached Battle.net's security and acquired... Read more...
Apple may have won its case against Samsung in the US this past August, but in the UK, things haven't proven to be so successful. In the US case, which took much of Samsung's portfolio into question, it was deemed that the company did in fact mimic many of product design choices Apple itself had made well before Samsung. In the UK, it's only Samsung's Galaxy Tab that was brought into question, squaring off of course, against the iPad. In July, the judge in charge of the UK case claimed that Samsung's product wasn't "as cool" as Apple's, nor did it feature the same sort of "extreme simplicity". Apple countered that the physical design is only where things begin, while it's the user interface where... Read more...
Samsung owes Apple in the neighborhood of a billion dollars after a jury found the company guilty of copying the look and feel of Apple devices and running afoul of several design patents. The high profile trial was rarely without drama, often times at the dismay at Judge Lucy Koh, who warned both companies on numerous occasions to shape up and quit with the antics. The trial is over now, but as predicted, Samsung isn't done fighting. What's surprising is Samsung's strategy. In a court filing, Samsung has requested a new trial due to jury misconduct. In particular, Samsung accuses a single juror of lying during the jury selection process. "The jury foreman, Velvin Hogan, failed to answer truthfully... Read more...
While gamers move and gyrate in front of Microsoft's Kinect motion sensor for the Xbox 360, the Redmond outfit will have to do some maneuvering of its own...in court. A company called Intelligent Verification Systems claims in federal court that the Kinect infringes on a 2006 patent for an "Animated Toy Utilizing Artificial Intelligence and Facial Image Recognition." According to Courthouse News Service, the patent in question specifically calls attention to the technology's potential application for video games, video game systems, and other entertainment systems. The complaint states the invention was the first of its kind, and all previous facial recognition technology was found only in security... Read more...
One current and two former Hewlett-Packard employees have been named in a criminal bribery case brought on by German prosecutors. According to the indictment, a three-year investigation found that HP executives issued $10 million in kickbacks in order to secure a contract worth four and a half times as much with Russia's Prosecutor General Office. Why would Germany get involved? The three HP executives allegedly helped create a fund designed to funnel money to Russia through a German subsidiary, passing through a number of shell companies and accounts along the way. Those named in the indictment include Hilmar Lorenz (forming HP marketing executive in Russia), Ken Willett (Germany-based American... Read more...
Samsung is certainly feeling spunky these days. After launching a pretty hilarious ad campaign poking fun at Apple users who wait in long lines to purchase every new iPhone iteration, the smartphone maker is again going on the offensive, but in a more serous manner. Reportedly, Samsung said it expects to sue Apple for alleged patent infringement over the iPhone 5, a device that launches to retail tomorrow. "Based on information currently available, Samsung expects the iPhone 5 will infringe the asserted Samsung patents-in-suit in the same way as the other accused iPhone models," Samsung's legal team said in a court filing. Samsung will make the final decision "as soon as it has had a reasonable... Read more...
You knew it'd happen. Despite being handed down on a Friday, the ruling over the Apple vs. Samsung patent trial was going to evoke statements, and potentially more, from both sides. And now that the verdict is in, both Apple and Samsung are making public statements. Naturally, the tones on each side could not possibly be more different. Apple is celebrating the outcome as a victory for innovation, saying that it was "about values." Of course, the same Apple that celebrates these values says nothing of the Notification Center pull-down UI that it seemingly snagged from Android, nor of iMessage and its similarity to RIM's BBM protocol. At any rate, here's Apple's blurb: "We are grateful to the... Read more...
Dell and two other companies are going to receive a combined $198.5 million payment from Sharp to settle a civil lawsuit brought forth against a group of companies for setting artificially high prices for liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. Sharp, along with several other companies, was found guilty of price fixing following an investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice and was already dinged for $120 million in fines. This $198.5 million payment is in addition to money already paid. "After broadly considering factors such as the U.S. civil lawsuit system and the facts of this case, Sharp has determined that agreeing to a settlement is the best policy," Sharp said in a statement. As of... Read more...
"Rampant patent litigation." If you've followed consumer technology for any small amount of time, you'd know that it's happening. Apple vs. Samsung. Yahoo vs. Facebook. HTC, Motorola, Google -- you name it. If it's a large tech company, it's probably worried somewhat about being sued over patents. Companies that are involved don't seem to be making any grandiose public claims about this misfortune. But the tech media, and consumers at large, are growing tired of the back-and-forth. And you know it's bad when even a entity as large and hulking (and busy) as the International Telecommunication Union puts out a press release addressing the matter. The ITU has been involved in a lot of the patent... Read more...
Ouch. Toshiba is the latest panel maker to feel the pinch after being fined a whopping $87 million by a U.S. jury in a price fixing verdict. This week, Toshiba and its subsidiary, Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. (TAEC), announced that a jury in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California (San Francisco) issued a verdict against Toshiba in the amount of $87 million due to alleged antitrust practices in the LCD business. It's just one of many companies found guilty over the past few years, and Toshiba is making clear that it expects to not pay for any of it. Why? Because they think they're innocent. This class action was filed in 2007 by direct purchasers... Read more...
Nope! That's the answer given to Apple by the International Trade Commission, shutting down its hopes for an emergency ban against HTC products. It's actually one of only a few "No!" responses heard on the legal front lately, as Judge Koh managed to give Apple the ability to halt sales of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 and the Galaxy Nexus pending the outcome of the whole shebang. Now, the U.S. ITC has ruled that HTC can continue to import smartphones while the agency "investigates whether the phones violate an order that the Taiwanese company stop infringing an Apple." The claim is that HTC is still in violation of an order issued in December; the ITC denied the emergency request to have phones like the... Read more...
Social networking site LinkedIn reportedly faces a $5 million class action lawsuit over a recent security breach that compromised the passwords of millions of members. The suit was filed by Katie Szpyrka in the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of California. Szpyrka says LinkedIn "failed to properly safeguard its users' digitally stored personally identifiable information, including email addresses, passwords, and login credentials," ZDNet reports. As a result, she wants LinkedIn to cough up $5 million in damages, which works out to less than a dollar for each of the 6.46 million passwords that were compromised. Image Credit: LinkedIn While these things happen, Szyprka takes issue... Read more...
Lawsuits, lawsuits, and a few more suits. That's staying in the news here lately, with loads of major technology companies ratcheting up the ammunition in court cases against one another. Now, however, we're finally getting a breather in one of the more public spats. Motorola and Apple have been at each other for months, even years now, but a U.S. district judge has opted to dismiss a case -- tentatively, at least -- surrounding lawsuits between the two. Naturally, the suits concern patent infringements between Apple and Motorola Mobility, which was recently acquired by Google. Why did the judge pull the plug for now? He said that "both companies failed to support a case for damages and because... Read more...
Well, this just got even more interesting. Last October, it was reported that Samsung's Galaxy Nexus was designed to be "Apple-proof." Basically, it was engineered specifically to step outside of those bounds that has drawn fire from Apple's legal team. Guess they missed the market. Apple has just upped the ante in the Apple vs. Samsung spat by asking a federal court in California to bar Samsung from selling the Galaxy Nexus (also known as the planet's first Android 4.0 smartphone) in the U.S., saying that four patent violations are to blame. Among those are violations that include voice-command search, likely too similar to Siri for Apple's comfort. The suit reportedly shows Apple blaming the... Read more...
Apple may have bitten off more than it cares to chew when it purchased the iPad trademark from Taiwan's Proview Technology for a mere $55,000 back in 2006. There's now a dispute over whether Apple was granted permission to use the trademark in mainland China. Proview says that was never part of the deal, Apple says it was, and the former is suing the latter for 10 billion yuan in damages and an apology. That works out to about $1.6 billion, plus whatever an apology is worth. In an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Proview chairman Yang Rongshan called Apple's iPad a "great product," but that doesn't excuse Apple allegedly infringing on his company's trademark. "We've been negotiating with... Read more...
Ouch. Kodak's had some troubles of late, but now that the end may be near, they're trying everything they can to stay afloat. Samsung is the latest company to get nailed by passing debris, as Eastman Kodak announced today that it has filed a lawsuit against Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., alleging infringement of certain patents related to Kodak digital imaging technology. Kodak's been on somewhat of a lawsuit streak lately, and taking aim at Samsung is proof that they aren't playing around. Kodak has licensed its digital imaging patents to more than 30 leading technology companies, including LG, Motorola, and Nokia, with all of the licenses royalty-bearing to Kodak, but of course Samsung isn't... Read more...
Hopefully you've been in the giving mood, but unlike Seiko Epson here, you've been doing so without grumbling. The company announced that it has agreed to settle for US$80 million civil lawsuits filed against it in the United States and United Kingdom by Nokia Corporation of Finland and its subsidiaries, seeking damages stemming from purchases of liquid crystal displays. Yeah, ouch. In November 2009, Nokia filed lawsuits in the United States and United Kingdom against Epson and its subsidiary companies including Epson Imaging Devices Corporation alleging violations of antitrust and competition laws. Epson has denied liability and vigorously defended the lawsuits. Because of the ongoing impacts... Read more...
When Apple won its initial injunction request against Samsung ten days ago, it was noted that the company had a separate legal proceeding underway in the Netherlands that was aimed at a similar goal. New information suggests that Apple's requests in this case are much broader and aimed at disassembling Samsung's ability to sell products in Europe at virtually every level. Apple's filing requests injunctive relief across Samsung's entire line of Galaxy products including the Galaxy Ace, S, and S II, the Galaxy Tab 7 and 10.1, and the Galaxy Gio, Nexus, 551, Europa, Apollo, and Mini. The Cupertino-based manufacturer also wants a much more comprehensive injunction than it won ten days ago. The initial... Read more...
AT&T has filed eight separate suites against the law firm of Bursor & Fisher over the firm's ongoing efforts to persuade consumers to fight the wireless giant's proposed merger with T-Mobile. The merger would give AT&T and Verizon control of an estimated 80 percent of the wireless market. T-Mobile, which is owned by Deutsche Telecom, is the fourth-largest carrier in the US and has an estimated 150 million subscribers worldwide. AT&T's own justifications for the merger suffered a major blow last week when an unredacted document posted to the FCC's website demolished the company's claims that it needed to buy T-Mobile in order to shoulder the cost of upgrading its LTE network to... Read more...
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