Items tagged with Hacking

Traditional passwords have started to yield ground to biometric security options, like fingerprint scanning and even retina scans. Going even deeper (literally), there's yet another method that involves authenticating a person's identity by scanning his or her veins. It sounds secure, except that researchers have already found a way to thwart it using wax. The process of authenticating a user's veins involves scanning the shape, size, and position of veins that are underneath a person's hand, and then comparing the scan with a record that is already on file. It's believed that German's Federal... Read more...
In what could pass for a scene in a movie, a hacker managed to breach a school district's database and steal 10 years worth of personal data belonging to half a million students and staff. Only this wasn't a movie, it happened in real life. Had it been a movie, the hacker would likely have been revealed to be a student or former employee. It's not clear who the actual culprit is, though, only that it was a pretty serious security breach. The mystery hacker infiltrated the San Diego Unified School District, which contained a wealth of personal data—first and last names, dates of birth, mailing... Read more...
In a groundbreaking move, the Library of Congress and US Copyright Office have proposed new rules that will give consumers the ability to legally hack the DRM of electronic devices to repair or maintain those devices. The devices these proposed rules would cover and legalize the hacking of include smartphones, voice assistants, tractors, cars, smart home appliances, and other devices. These proposed rules will be a major win for the right to repair movement. Devices that can be legally hacked would have to be "lawfully acquired" meaning that the proposed rules wouldn't make it legal to hack... Read more...
Implanted ID devices certainly aren’t new; they have been used to help lost pets return home for many years now. These little chips are embedded under the skin of the dog or cat, and if picked up by animal control, the chip can be scanned, and the pets returned home. They are rather like tags that can’t be lost and both the injection and presence of the device under the skin goes unnoticed by most animals. These implanted chips are now going mainstream for people, according to a man called Patrick Kramer of Digiwell, who has implanted about 2,000 similar chips into humans but this is... Read more...
Let's start with the good news. Cryptocurrency mining on GPUs has waned considerably, and the shortage of graphics cards that made it nearly impossible to score a mid-range or high-end GPU at or near MSRP is over (for the most part). Are you ready for the bad news? Be that as it may, cryptocurrency mining hacks are on the rise, and a leaked tool by the US National Security Agency (NSA) may be partially to blame. That's the takeaway from a new report by Cyber Threat Alliance (CTA), a cybersecurity association with some major names among its members, including Cisco, Juniper Networks, McAfee, Sophos,... Read more...
There is a rash of complaints on Twitter over a recent Instagram hack that has left numerous users unable to access their accounts. Preliminary data suggests that the shenanigans originate from Russia, though nothing has been confirmed. Instagram is investigation the issue, and in the meantime, it has some advice for users. "If you received an email from us notifying you of a change in your email address, and you did not initiate this change— please click the link marked ‘revert this change’ in the email, and then change your password," Instagram advised in blog post. My instagram... Read more...
If your laptop contains sensitive data, it is best not to leave it unattended. That is sound advice even it does not have any work secrets or other potentially compromising data, and you want to avoid falling prey to malware. In case you need a reason why, a security firm recently posted a video showing how quickly a hacker with physical access to someone's laptop can install malicious firmware onto the device. These types of security intrusions are called "evil maid" attacks, named after the scenario of someone breaking into a hotel room to physically access a target's notebook. Normally only... Read more...
Every so often, WikiLeaks publishes top-secret documents outlining various hacking tools and malware used by the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Most of the documents we have seen are presumably outdated, but for obvious reasons, the CIA would still like to keep them under lock and key. The agency would also like to arrest the person responsible for providing the documents to Wikileaks, and has identified a possible suspect. That person is Joshua Adam Schulte, a former employee of a CIA group tasked with programming code to spy on foreign threats, The Washington Post reports. Federal... Read more...
MyEtherWallet confirmed on Twitter that hackers hijacked its Domain Name System (DNS) servers and redirected users to a phishing site in Russia. By obtaining private keys from affected users, the hackers reportedly were able to swipe around 215 Ethereum coins (ETH) worth somewhere in the neighborhood of $150,000. The attack lasted for several hours, and one user in particular lost more than 85 ETH worth almost $60,000. In the Twitter post, MyEtherWallet emphasized that the security breach did not take place on its side of the equation, and that it's currently in the process of verifying exactly... Read more...
Uber suffered a data breach back in October 2016 that affected tens of millions of people, and it is just now letting the public know about it, as 2018 rolls into view. This latest incident is yet another black eye for a company that has been beat up in the media over questionable decision making in the past, such as using special software to evade detection from authorities, but better late than never, right? To be fair, this is not th fault of Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, who recently replace Travis Kalanick as the ridesharing company's boss. And to Khosrowshahi's credit, he responded to knowledge... Read more...
Hacking happens all the time, and when it affects a large number of people, companies typically disclose the breach. Not always, of course, sometimes not even in a timely manner. As it pertains to Microsoft, something a little different occurred several years ago. Several former employees say a sophisticated hacking group busted into a secret internal database, which Microsoft never made public. Five ex-employees each told Rueters the same thing in separate interviews. All of them claim the breach happened in 2013, with Microsoft responding in private rather than disclosing the extent of the attack... Read more...
A security expert at Belgian university KU Leuven has discovered a major vulnerability in the Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) protocol that could a expose a user's wireless Internet traffic, including usernames and passwords that are entered into secure websites. The vulnerability affects most devices and several operating systems, including Android, iOS, Windows, Linux, and OpenBSD. "Attackers can use this novel attack technique to read information that was previously assumed to be safely encrypted," Marthy Vanhoef, a security expert at Belgian university KU Leuven, wrote in a detailed report... Read more...
Late last year a hack was perpetrated on what is called a "partner organization" that worked with the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD). The unnamed organization notified the ASD that it was hacked in November of 2016, and that outside parties gained access to its network. The small organization has only 50 employees and is a subcontractor to the Department of Defense, providing aerospace engineering assistance. The data that was stolen in the hack contained information that is protected under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and included details on the F-35 Lightning II... Read more...
Do you know what hackers were doing around this time five years ago? They were breaking into a database at Disqus, the popular blog comment hosting service supported by scores of websites, in many cases in place of traditional web forums (remember those?). Disqus only found out about it this past Thursday and began alerting users a day later, rather than waiting like many companies often do. "On October 5th, we were alerted to a security breach that impacted a database from 2012. While we are still investigating the incident, we believe that it is best to share what we know now," Disqus stated... Read more...
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