Items tagged with DRM

Internet retail giant Amazon.com today launched its "Amazon MP3" digital music download service. The 2 million songs available come without Digital Rights  Management restrictions, and will play on most any device  that can handle a sound file. Most songs are priced from 89 cents to 99 cents, with more than 1 million of the 2 million songs priced at 89 cents. The top 100 best-selling songs are 89 cents, unless marked otherwise. Most albums are priced from $5.99 to $9.99. The top 100 best-selling albums are $8.99 or less, unless marked otherwise. Every song on Amazon MP3 is encoded at 256 kilobits per second, which gives customers high audio quality at a manageable... Read more...
This week the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) released a report which investigated DRM used in 16 different products and services. The conclusion was that many DRM technologies fail to comply with basic requirements of Canadian privacy law.The study, published by the University of Ottawa’s Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC), indicated that DRM is being used to collect, use and disclose consumers’ personal information for secondary purposes, without giving the user adequate notice or the opportunity to opt-out of collection. The report investigated DRM systems used in 16 different digital products and services including Apple’s... Read more...
SpiralFrog, a free online music download service, launches today. The service hopes to make a go of it with the holy grail of RIAA haters -- ad-supported free music downloads. Founder Joe Mohen predicts they'll need 10 million users per month to make enough money to pay the licensing fees on the music. Is it really that hard to give away free stuff? "Registration is fairly quick, requiring a name, age, gender and ZIP code. Mac users can't use the service at all; Firefox users will probably need to install a Windows Media Player plug-in that requires all other browser windows to be closed (ugh). The site also requires Flash 9 and SpiralFrog's download manager, which allows a Download... Read more...
Wal-Mart has joined the likes of Amazon.com and iTunes today - it is offering MP3 downloads, free of DRM.  Much as it's hard to applaud anything Wal-Mart does, it is a major step when the world's largest retailer signs up. Wal-Mart announces the launch of "DRM-free" MP3 music downloads, now available online at https://www.walmart.com. At only 94 cents per track and $9.22 per album, the new MP3 digital format delivers value, convenience and the ability for customers to play music on nearly any device, including iPod(R), iPhone(R) and Zune(TM) portable media players. Wal-Mart is one of the first major retailers to offer MP3 digital tracks with music content from major record labels such as Universal... Read more...
Perhaps signalling another nail in the coffin of DRM, Universal Music Group has announced that it will begin a test program of DRM-free music sales, starting August 21st and lasting through January 31st of next year.  Surprisingly, the songs will not be available through iTunes, which has already been selling DRM-free music from EMI, though for a higher price than normal ($1.29 vs. 99¢). Universal, the world’s biggest music conglomerate, said it would offer albums and songs without the software, known as digital rights management, through existing digital music retail services like RealNetworks and Wal-Mart, nascent services from Amazon.com and Google, and some artists’ Web sites.The... Read more...
Now that Apple is offering some of its content DRM free users are finding that their names and email addresses are being added to the file details!  Here's a snippet from Wired: "Earlier this week, Apple iTunes 7.2 brought the new ability to download tracks from EMI Records without copy protection. But the unprotected files are labeled with the buyer's details, leading some to wonder if Apple is appending the information as an anti-piracy measure.But Apple is remaining mum about its reasoning." The article goes on to quote Jupiter Research analyst Michael Gartenberg, who seems to be a little confused about the difference between the words may and can, about the reasoning behind the change.... Read more...
The music industry's answer to music piracy is DRM(Digital Rights Management) software. While many record labels claim it's necessary to combat piracy, there's a growing number of consumers that feel it infringes on their rights as customers, keeping them from listening to their tunes on any device they wish. In an effort to increase online music sales, Apple and EMI have teamed up to offer EMI's entire music catalog online, DRM free, through iTunes. The one exception being their Beatles collection. "Higher-quality music files, which will play on any computer and any digital-audio player, will not replace the copy-protected... Read more...
While currently this news only affects Acrobat 8 volume licenses on the Windows OSes, it seems like a good step in the right direction. For those who have been having upgrade issues with single user versions of Acrobat, hang in there. "Effective immediately, all Acrobat 8 for Windows installation media will be provided with ALM disabled. The final date for availability of ALM-related processes on the Adobe Licensing Website is April 9, 2007." Will we see an Apple ad poking fun at this being a Windows problem?  Maybe.... Read more...
Digital Rights Management (DRM) has been the subject of much debate for quite some time now and unfortunately it doesn't look like that will change any time soon. Recently, an e-petition signed by over 1,400 people to ban DRM was rejected by the United Kingdom, which plans on continuing to support DRM practices. While the government plans to continue to back DRM as a way for companies to protect their content, there is a possible plan in the works to make reporting abusive DRM technology possible. The government has rejected a call to ban the digital locks that limit what people can do with the software, music and movies they own. A... Read more...
EMI is a big music company. It's the largest music publisher in the world. And they appear to be ready to shed the digital rights management that makes moving your music from one device to another such a pain - if the money's right, that is: According to the people familiar with the matter, London-based EMI asked the retailers to submit proposals by Thursday telling the company what size advance payments they would offer in exchange for the right to sell EMI's music as MP3s, the Journal reported. One of the unidentified people said EMI would decide whether to forge ahead with the strategy based on the size of the offers. A decision about... Read more...
Engadget has a story, complete with a short video, on-line that claims the AACS (Advanced Access Content System) DRM technology incorporated into HD-DVD has been cracked. Before anyone in the HD-DVD camps starts boo-hooing, or anyone in the Blu-Ray camp starts cheering, I'd wager this actually helps boost the popularity of HD-DVDs over Blu-Ray. "Can it be? Is Hollywood's new DRM posterchild AACS (Advanced Access Content System, see more here) actually quite breakable? According to a post on our favoritest of forums (Doom9) by DRM hacker du jour muslix64, his new BackupHDDVD tool decrypts and dismantles AACS on a Windows PC. Just feed the small utility a crypto key (it comes bundled with keys... Read more...
The noise over what to do about Digital Rights Management and how the idea should be approached is a battle that's been raging on for a while now. Public outcry was sparked last year when rootkit software was discovered on CDs produced by Sony, and really hasn't died down since. In their latest article, eCoustics discusses what DRM has become, and how it can possibly affect us 20-30 years down the road. "DRM has become a huge flashpoint for consumers because of one simple fact -- entertainment companies' fear of piracy. The music industry -- rattled by its bitter experience with peer-to-peer networks that allowed consumers to swap music across... Read more...
As Google continues to strengthen their hold on just about every type of media possible, they've released little information as to what kind of DRM solution they will use. We know they will use they're own software, but as The Register reports, other details are still unclear. "We might be less nervous about Google's DRM revelation if it provided more information on the technology. Page refused to say anything beyond the two sentences above, and played off the whole DRM thing as no big deal."... Read more...
More bad news for Sony and their customers, as Sony's XCP uninstall software apparently suffers from the same problem as the DRM software its self... security flaws. Sony has announced they will pull all their XCP infected CDs from store shelves."The consequences of the flaw are severe," Felten and Halderman wrote in a blog posting Tuesday. "It allows any Web page you visit to download, install, and run any code it likes on your computer. Any Web page can seize control of your computer; then it can do anything it likes. That's about as serious as a security flaw can get."What a week, eh? We'll keep you informed as the saga continues...... Read more...
First ... Prev 3 4 5 6 7 Next