Items tagged with DRM

While both the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One are a ways off from their release, I can already tell you one thing to expect: neither console is going to be fun as the previous-generation. Why? It's simple: consoles used to be about gaming, plain and simple. Today, consoles are becoming more like PCs; they're being infused with TV, movies, music and other content. Sure, more stuff to do could be interpreted as "better", but what we're also getting are additional "protective" headaches, such as DRM, rumored for the Xbox One and now the PlayStation 4. Last week, Joel wrote up a great editorial that explains his thoughts on used game DRM. As he eloquently states, "Do you know why Microsoft hasn't 'confirmed... Read more...
Years ago, DRM was finally kicked out of the digital music scene. And consumers rejoiced heartily. But DRM is still a major, major factor across the entire spectrum of digital content -- be it UltraViolet for movies, or DRM filters embedded onto Blu-ray Discs, and most things in between. Now, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which is responsible for coming together and putting forth Web standards, has published a draft for Encrypted Media Extensions (EME). What's that, you ask? It's a structure that'll allow DRM content to be displayed in the browser, without plug-ins like Flash or Silverlight being required. In other words, it's a major step forward. Yes, DRM is still there, but this could... Read more...
Whether it's software, games, movies or even books, piracy is rampant. There's no denying that, and there's no one that understands the harmful effects of it better than the content creators themselves. Over the years, we've seen some humorous attempts at trying to sway the pirate towards becoming a paying customer, and there's probably little doubt that some have worked. In recent memory, Serious Sam 3 introduced a monster only in the pirated version of the game that hunted you down indefinitely and was impossible to kill. There's also Take On Helicopters, which corrupted textures on purpose in the pirated version of the game. Humorously, before these mechanics were understood, some pirates... Read more...
For the past nine days, Maxis has been caught in a firestorm of epic proportions. Having failed to beta test the game appropriately or account for actual server loads, Maxis' SimCity servers disintegrated under the onslaught of people wanting to play a game they paid for. Since launch day, company executives and representatives have remained steadfast on one point -- the game must be played online. "With the way that the game works, we offload a significant amount of the calculations to our servers so that the computations are off the local PCs and are moved into the cloud. It wouldn't be possible to make the game offline without a significant amount of engineering work by our team." Maxis general... Read more...
The problem with DRM schemes is they tend to punish honest paying customers with a level of inconvenience that's annoying at best, and crippling at worst. Every once in awhile we're reminded of this, such as the current server SNAFU that's affecting SimCity, an otherwise well-received game with favorable reviews. Electronics Arts (EA) is a big proponent of DRM, and when you load SimCity, it has to first check in with the mother ship to make verify you're not a digital pirate. After that, it requires an always-on connection. Fair enough, but if you're going to go through the trouble of attempting to weed out unscrupulous users who may have obtained the game through illicit means, you better make... Read more...
Toshiba this week announced the launch of new microSDHC memory cards based on SeeQVault technology, a mobile DRM standard licensed by NSM Initiatives LLC and backed by Panasonic, Samsung, and Sony. The technology applies bidirectional authentication with a unique identifier and public key infrastructure, and can be integrated into flash memory cards along with the devices that run them. "SeeQVault technology gives consumers access to the latest digital content - and the freedom to enjoy it across platforms. The SeeQVault card can be used for playback of content from a smart phone, tablet or TV with a high level of security," Toshiba says. The end-game is to tie content such as pre-loaded movies... Read more...
Sony's next-generation PS4 unveil is just two weeks away, which means leaks concerning both it and Microsoft's next-generation Xbox Durango (sometimes referred to as the Xbox 720), are at an all-time high as well. Unfortunately, not all the news is good. Rumors continue to swirl that the next iteration of Xbox will lock out used games entirely and require a constant Internet connection. The used games angle is something we've covered before. New games would come with a one-time activation code to play. Use the code, and the game is locked to the particular console or Xbox Live account it's loaded on. Physical games will still be sold (the Durango reportedly supports 50GB Blu-ray Discs), but the... Read more...
It may have taken Ubisoft a hundred million years to figure out that honest-to-goodness consumers really, really despise always-on Digital Rights Management (DRM) schemes, but bless the publisher's heart for finally caving. Actually, Ubisoft did away with always-on DRM over a year ago, but is just now making it official. "We have listened to feedback, and since June last year our policy for all of PC games is that we only require a one-time activation when you first install the game, and from then you are free to play the game offline," Ubisoft's Worldwide Director for Online Games, Stephanie Perotti, stated in an interview. Perotti and Corporate Communications Director, Michael Burk, spoke at... Read more...
There's something funky going on in Apple's App Store that's corrupting several iOS apps, causing them to crash immediately on launch. The issue reportedly affects over 70 apps, including some high profile ones like Instapaper and Angry Birds Space (free edition). Instapaper creator Marco Arment first noted the issue when, just moments after Apple approved his Instapaper 4.2.3 update, he was bombarded by support emails and Twitter messages complaining that his app was crashing, even when performing a clean install. "This didn't make sense -- obviously, Apple had reviewed it, and it worked for them. My submitted archive from Xcode worked perfectly," Arment posted on his blog. "But every time I... Read more...
UltraViolet. Heard of it? Not surprising. It's the movie industry's big-money shot at curtailing piracy, and while loads of companies are onboard, few people have heard of it -- let alone understand it. One major factor is that Apple, a leader selling of media online, isn't onboard with the program, and these days, it's tough to win in media distribution if Apple isn't on your side. All of that aside, UltraViolet is hoping to get a major push by teaming up with a major retailer: Walmart. According to the Wall Street Journal, Walmart is talking with UltraViolet in order to bring a service to stores that will "assist customers in registering DVDs they already own with the movie industry's UltraViolet... Read more...
Strangely, it feels like DRM is getting a second wind. When Apple announced that the iTunes Music Store would go DRM-free, the world took notice. A few years later, DRM is creeping back, and we suspect this wave will be harder to stop. Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group, SanDisk and Western Digital have all aligned on one thing: DRM, or piracy protection. The working title of the group is Project Phenix, and it's described as an initiative that will give consumers an easier and faster way to organize, store and move their high definition digital movies and TV shows – including new releases in up to full 1080p quality - across multiple devices.... Read more...
DRM? Yeah, it's still a thing. Today at CES, Rovi announced Rovi Digital Copy Solution, a DRM solution that'll enable onsumers to access their physical DVD and Blu-ray Disc movie collections via the cloud. Rovi Digital Copy Solution integrates into consumer electronics devices and PC applications, allowing them to recognize a movie on physical disc, authenticate its origin, and then trigger access to a copy from the UltraViolet Digital Library. Digital copies can then be enjoyed by consumers from virtually anywhere on a range of enabled connected devices that may include HDTVs, Blu-ray Disc players, set-top boxes, game consoles, smartphones, tablets, and PCs. Rovi Digital Copy Solution incorporates... Read more...
Looking for a last minute gift idea? Time is running out, but if you have $5 to spare, a sense of humor, and want to flip the finger at big media companies who insist on shackling their content with sometimes draconian-level DRM schemes, you need to purchase Louis C.K.'s "Live at the Beacon Theater" comedy download. Many of you already have. Louis C.K. cut out all the middlemen and made his performance available for purchase on his website for a Lincoln note, which entitles you to download the 720p video up to three times and watch it wherever and whenever you want. There's no DRM, just a reasonably priced 1-hour video that you're free to burn to DVD, and he even put up free DVD box cover and... Read more...
Game publishers are in love with DRM, even the Draconian kind that every once in awhile causes an uproar in the gaming community. Remember Spore? It initially shipped with a three-activation limit, and like baseball, three strikes and you're out. This limit was later relaxed by Electronic Arts, who upped it to five activations and made it possible to de-authorize machines, but only after it became a huge controversy. Anti-DRM advocates even went so far as to trash Spore's rating on Amazon with negative reviews and 1-star votes without having purchased the game, and to this day, Spore is only rated 1.5/5 stars. Three years later, a little title called The Witcher 2 is said to have notched 250,000... Read more...
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next ... Last