Items tagged with CrossFire

As long as we have been able to cram multiple video cards into our computers, the branding from NVIDIA and AMD had been the same. NVIDIA calls its multi-GPU tech SLI and AMD has coined theirs CrossFire. With the release of the new drivers to allow gamers to put multiple Radeon RX Vega graphics cards inside gaming PCs, that CrossFire branding has been shelved. When AMD announced the new drivers there was no CrossFire mentioned at all, and so PC World asked why. An AMD rep said, "CrossFire isn’t mentioned because it technically refers to DX11 applications. In DirectX 12, we reference multi-GPU as applications must support mGPU, whereas AMD has to create the profiles for DX11. We’ve accordingly... Read more...
If you are a gamer that is still getting by with Windows 8.1 or even Windows 7 as your primary operating system of choice, there are a number of storms that are brewing to rain on your parade. Yesterday, we brought you news that Microsoft is completely shutting down Windows Update for AMD Ryzen and Intel Kaby Lake PCs running the aforementioned operating systems. Today we are hearing that the low-level Vulkan API will not support multiple GPUs on Windows 7 or Windows 8.1. The Dark Side Of Gaming came across the disappointing bit of news when rummaging through Khronos Group’s slides from GDC 2017. One slide entitled “Vulkan Multi-GPU and Virtual Reality Support” clearly points out that “WDDM must... Read more...
The developers at Rocksteady Studios have given up on fixing multi-GPU support in Batman: Arkham Knight. Publisher Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment (just WB from here on out) confirmed that was the case when addressing a gamer's question on Steam's community forums. At this point in game's development -- post release for a second time -- cleaning up the code to improve the experience for gamers running SLI and Crossfire configurations is proving too much work for too little payoff. Continuing to develop for mulit-GPU setups could also introduce more problems for all players, and that's not something WB is keen on doing. "We’ve been working with our development and graphics driver partners... Read more...
At GDC a few weeks ago, NVIDIA teased a new set of drivers that it promised would offer huge scaling benefits for both single-GPU and SLI configurations. The new driver, 337.50 Beta, drops today -- so what kind of gains can users expect? If you own a high-end NVIDIA card, apparently quite a bit, especially if you game with multiple GPUs in SLI. NVIDIA is predicting some huge jumps for its high-end range with scaling up 50-70% in some cases. These are an impressive set of gains for NVIDIA's top-end cards, particularly the GTX 770, which remains rather more affordable than the top-end GTX 780 Ti. NVIDIA's own slide deck claims "up to 64% faster single GPU performance," but none of the slides the... Read more...
Although the market for them is relatively small, we love to check out elaborate, no-holds-barred gaming PCs from time to time--you know, the kind of system that costs about the same amount as a serviceable used car. As fun as it is to check out an ultra high-end gaming rig, we also do it to gauge the user experience and to see just how much better it is (or isn't) versus a mainstream PC. But how great is the experience, really? The answer needs to be darn near perfection, because – let’s face it – a midrange gaming desktop is going to give you a pretty solid gaming experience (and look good doing it) without inflicting nearly the same damage to your wallet. Though the phrase... Read more...
Although the market for them is relatively small, we love to check out elaborate, no-holds-barred gaming PCs from time to time--you know, the kind of system that costs about the same amount as a serviceable used car. As fun as it is to check out an ultra high-end gaming rig, we also do it to gauge the user experience and to see just how much better it is (or isn't) versus a mainstream PC. But how great is the experience, really?  The answer needs to be darn near perfection, because – let’s face it – a midrange gaming desktop is going to give you a pretty solid gaming experience (and look good doing it) without inflicting nearly the same damage to... Read more...
While AMD just announced a whole new line of graphics cards, which generally results in system builders announcing new configuration options with the impending products inside, at least one boutique builder is going in another direction entirely--all the way in the other direction, actually. Origin PC CEO and co-founder Kevin Wasielewski told us that the company is no longer offering AMD GPUs in its systems and will solely provide NVIDIA graphics options. His reasons were initially vague: “This decision was based on a combination of many factors including customer experiences, GPU performance/drivers/stability, and requests from our support staff. Based on our 15+ years of experience building... Read more...
A few months back, AMD announced that it had lured Raja Koduri back from Apple and installed him as the new Corporate Vice President of its Visual Computing division. Koduri was a long time AMD employee who left for Apple, but came back to AMD at a relatively tumultuous time. Why someone as prominent as Mr. Koduri would leave the most valuable company in the world for a struggling AMD had many people scratching their heads. But at AMD’s GPU Tech event currently taking place Hawaii, Raja explained why he came back and also hinted at some upcoming technology, which should be revealed soon. AMD's Chris Hook Introducing Raja Koduri At Diamond Head Raja claimed he came back to AMD... Read more...
If you’ve read any our video card reviews for the last few months, you’ve probably noticed that we have included frame time results using FCAT in our performance data. For single GPU configurations, the FCAT/frame time data was interesting to look at, but it didn’t show any major issues across a wide swath of both AMD and NVIDIA built GPUs. Multi-GPU configurations, however, were a completely different story altogether. Way more often than not NVIDIA SLI-based solutions offered smoother, more consistent frame times across the board, whereas AMD CrossFire-based solutions suffered from erratic frame pacing, which resulted in wild swings in frame times. A few months back,... Read more...
Today marks one of those funky occasions when you’ve probably been aware of the “new” product we’re going to show you for quite some time. And we’re not talking about a few days or weeks here either. In fact, it was all the way back in December of 2011, when AMD introduced the original Radeon HD 7970, that we first dropped hints that the dual-GPU powered Radeon HD 7990 was in the works. We dropped those hints back then because AMD dropped them on us in the lead-up to the Radeon HD 7970’s release. That little tidbit alone should give you a good idea as to how long the Radeon HD 7990 has been simmering in AMD’s kitchen. Though the product has obviously... Read more...
Today marks one of those funky occasions when you’ve probably been aware of the “new” product we’re going to show you for quite some time. And we’re not talking about a few days or weeks here either. In fact, it was all the way back in December of 2011, when AMD introduced the original Radeon HD 7970, that we first dropped hints that the dual-GPU powered Radeon HD 7990 was in the works. We dropped those hints back then because AMD dropped them on us in the lead-up to the Radeon HD 7970’s release. That little tidbit alone should give you a good idea as to how long the Radeon HD 7990 has been simmering in AMD’s kitchen. Though the product has obviously... Read more...
Inside sources have leaked information to the press claiming that the CPU in the next-generation PS4 (codenamed Orbis) is an AMD Llano A8-3850. The chip will supposedly be paired with an AMD Radeon 7670 GPU with 1GB of integrated VRAM. With all due respect to IGN, this is the sort of report that deserves a considerably better review than they apparently gave it. Sony may well be working with that level of AMD hardware, but that's not the same as shipping said configurations. Let's start with the APU. The A8-3850 was one of AMD's earliest Llano chips; a 100W 2.9GHz quad-core with an integrated Radeon 6550D. It didn't ship in high quantity -- AMD chose to emphasize shipping out mobile Llano's rather... Read more...
In this latest episode of HotHardware's Two and Half Geeks, Dave, Marco and our resident ¼ Geek Apprentice Michael (Dave's son) build a custom, high-end Gaming System for the winner of our totally awesome Dads and Grads sweepstakes! Enjoy this bad boy, Lamar! And a BIG thanks for entering the sweepstakes everyone! We’ll be announcing the next one soon! (Be sure to watch all the way to the very end--if you can handle the cuteness!)... Read more...
With the performance of more mainstream cards on the rise, monitor prices on a downward slide, and support for 5x1 Eyefinity available (sort of), we decided to see what a pair of Radeon HD 6870 cards running in CrossFire mode could do with a quintet of screen out in front. The cleanest way to pull off a 5x1 Eyefinity configuration, without using an array of adapters, is with a card that has at least five, similar outputs, connected to matching monitors. To that end, we got our hands on a pair of PowerColor Radeon HD 6870 2GB Eyefinity 6 Edition cards and five Dell 22” screens with DisplayPort inputs... AMD Radeon HD 6870 CrossFire with 5x1 Eyefinity... Read more...
Way back in September of ’09, AMD launched the Radeon HD 5800 series, and along with it officially unveiled its Eyefinity multi-display technology, which now pervades all Radeon HD 5000 and 6000 series cards in one form or another. Leading up to the release of the 5800 series, AMD tried to keep Eyefinity a close guarded secret, so its arrival was a pleasant surprise for most consumers and a not so pleasant one for rival NVIDIA perhaps. Dual and multi-screen gaming wasn’t new per say, just ask die-hard Flight Simulator fans who have been doing it for years.  However, AMD’s implementation was much more elegant than any of hacks or other solutions available in the past.... Read more...
If you're in the market for an X58 motherboard, there are plenty of options available. A quick search fetches countless results that fill a wide range of price points. Budget conscious enthusiasts looking to save some scratch will be happy to find that almost every motherboard maker offers an X58 model under $200. On the other end of the spectrum, companies offer performance enthusiasts and overclockers a number of products that cater to pushing the performance envelope that often manifests itself while attempting to break world records. Asus provides serious hardware enthusiasts an excellent shot of achieving their goals with the Rampage III Extreme X58 motherboard. As the flagship model from... Read more...
If you're in the market for an X58 motherboard, there are plenty of options available. A quick search fetches countless results that fill a wide range of price points. Budget conscious enthusiasts looking to save some scratch will be happy to find that almost every motherboard maker offers an X58 model under $200. On the other end of the spectrum, companies offer performance enthusiasts and overclockers a number of products that cater to pushing the performance envelope that often manifests itself while attempting to break world records. Asus provides serious hardware enthusiasts an excellent shot of achieving their goals with the Rampage III Extreme X58 motherboard. As the flagship model from... Read more...
Back in April, we first gave you a glimpse of the extreme Asus ARES dual-Radeon HD 5870 GPU powered graphics card, complete with some preliminary benchmarks. At the time, the specifications weren't quite finalized and there was little word about availability in the U.S., but the card's impressive configuration immediately piqued our interest. The ARES was, after all, a "true dual-Radeon HD 5870" CrossFire setup on a single PCB. The Radeon HD 5970 was / is the fastest single graphics card on the market, and the Asus ARES would clearly offer more performance due to its increased number of stream processor cores and potentially higher clocks. Over the long holiday weekend, we received word that... Read more...
Back in April, we first gave you a glimpse of the extreme Asus ARES dual-Radeon HD 5870 GPU powered graphics card, complete with some preliminary benchmarks. At the time, the specifications weren't quite finalized and there was little word about availability in the U.S., but the card's impressive configuration immediately piqued our interest. The ARES was, after all, a "true dual-Radeon HD 5870" CrossFire setup on a single PCB. The Radeon HD 5970 was / is the fastest single graphics card on the market, and the Asus ARES would clearly offer more performance due to its increased number of stream processor cores and potentially higher clocks. Over the long holiday weekend, we received word that... Read more...
When you think about the market for a pre-built, proverbial "Killer Gaming Rig," you have to consider the class of consumer that would have interest in this type of system. For the most part, the average do-it-yourselfer isn't going to take much interest here, save for perhaps the appreciation of all the bleeding-edge technology and design quality that is the hallmark of such a system. That said, there is obviously a significant market opportunity for consumers that want top-of-the line components and build quality for enthusiast-class gaming performance and head-turning aesthetics, without the hassle of going at it the home-grown way. Dell obviously saw this market opportunity when they snatched... Read more...
When you think about the market for a pre-built, proverbial "Killer Gaming Rig," you have to consider the class of consumer that would have interest in this type of system. For the most part, the average do-it-yourselfer isn't going to take much interest here, save for perhaps the appreciation of all the bleeding-edge technology and design quality that is the hallmark of such a system.  That said, there is obviously a significant market opportunity for consumers that want top-of-the line components and build quality for enthusiast-class gaming performance and head-turning aesthetics, without the hassle of going at it the home-grown way.  Dell obviously saw this market opportunity... Read more...
Generally speaking, driver updates are rather staid affairs whether you prefer yours red or green. It's been years since the release of a driver series that could be expected to boost performance more than 10-15 percent or so in nearly any game.  The benefits of a driver upgrade tend to be more specifically focused on adding new features these days, but that's a trend, not a fact. With its new Catalyst 10.2 and upcoming 10.3 drivers, AMD is baking in a range of new functionality that should both improve performance in existing games, reduce GPU power consumption, and introduce new features and capabilities. Set and Spike: Catalyst 10.2 and 10.3A fair number of the goodies we'll discuss today... Read more...
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