Items tagged with Chromecast

It's true, whether you like it or not, we're back!  In this latest episode of HotHardware's Two and a Half Geeks, Iyaz, Dave and Marco return to ride again in full high tech geekery.  This week we discuss Apple's new MacBook Air 13 powered by Intel's 4th generation Haswell Core processor, EVGA's overclocked GeForce GTX 770, Google's tiny little Chromecast media streaming dongle and SanDisk's Extreme 64GB SDXC card. 02:00 - Apple's Haswell-Powered MacBook Air 13 06:45 - EVGA GeForce GTX 770 SC with ACX Cooling 10:50 - Nokia Lumia 1020 Video and Photo Shoot Preview 17:35 - SanDisk Extreme 64 SDXC Memory Card 24:15 - Google Chromecast Media Streaming Dongle... Read more...
The folks at iFixit had their way, tearing down Google's latest media streaming invention and now it seems the team at the GTVHacker blog has exploited the little fella known as Google Chromecast and rooted it with shell access on port 23 of the device. Google is known for stopping well short of locking things down, almost tempting developers and hackers to see what they can do with a new device. This "exploit" will give the community access to the Google Chromecast's environment with a chance to test custom software on the device, much like the community has done with Android smartphones over the years. Under the hood with Chromecast hardware - the software side is next...  It turns out,... Read more...
Good golly, the iFixit folks are fast; just days after Google announced its Chromecast media streaming device, we already have a look inside the small dongle. It’s a simple device, really; there’s a small motherboard assembly inside the plastic case, and the motherboard itself has four chips on it. iFixit Chromecast teardown (credit: iFixit) The colors have been added for clarity by iFixit, but the red one is an AzureWave 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and FM combo chip, and the orange one is a Marvell DE3005-A1 SoC. On the other side, there’s a 16Gb (2GB) Micron NAND flash chip (yellow) and a low-power 1.35V 512MB DDR3L SDRAM chip, also from Micron (green). iFixit Chromecast... Read more...
Even the best, most finely-constructed plans can go wrong, it seems. And sometimes, having a good problem is still having a problem. Earlier in the week, Google introduced a $35 HDMI dongle known as Chromecast, which was meant to bring some elements of Chrome and other elements of alternative TV viewing to anyone's HDTV. For cheap. And perhaps the best deal of all was the fact that three months of Netflix service was included for free, and that even extended to existing users. In other words, the Netflix service alone was nearly worth the price of admission, netting you the Chromecast dongle for free. Welp, evidently too many people noticed the deal, and now what was largely too good to be true... Read more...
When Google announced its Chromecast media streaming device yesterday, many were alarmed that the dongle’s capabilities seemed to overlap quite a bit with Google TV. The implications there are important, as not only are there plenty of folks who are developing for the Google TV platform, Google has a number of hardware partners who might chafe at seeing their investments devalued. More notably, Google has a habit of cancelling products that aren’t gaining sufficient traction (remember the Nexus Q?), and it’s not out of the question that Google TV, as it stands now, might fall into that category. However, it’s all good news for Google TV; according to the Google TV Developer... Read more...
The TV is the holy grail for companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple; all three have unified desktop, tablet, and smartphone screens with their respective operating systems (and to a lesser extent, with their own devices), but the last screen that none have been able to take over is the television. While it’s not the silver bullet needed to bridge the gap to the TV once and for all, Google’s new Chromecast device does offer a new way to get content from your devices onto the TV. The little dongle plugs into your TV, and once you connect it to your WiFi network and open a supported app, it streams content to the television via the Internet. You can control it with a smartphone,... Read more...
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