Reviews Of Desktop PCs, DIY PC Builds, All-In-Ones, And Small Form Factor PCs

In-depth product reviews and news of Computer Desktops, DIY PC Builds, All-In-One PCs, and Small Form Factor PCs. If it crunches numbers, pushes pixels, throws down the frag or provides a digital canvass for content creation, you'll find it there.

It seems that Shuttle consistently expands their line of XPC small form factor systems as new core logic chipsets are released. A quick trip to their product page reveals a current line-up of XPCs based on chipsets from Intel, NVIDIA, ATI, SiS and VIA. There are no less than six different chassis designs available as well, with each one designed to cater to a specific audience, and prices range from the mid-$200 mark to about $400 U.S. Looking at their current line-up, it clear that there certainly is no shortage of options available. Today, we're going to take a look at one of Shuttle's high-end offerings, namely the SN25P. This XPC is based on NVIDIA's nForce 4 Ultra chipset for AMD's socket... Read more...
When it comes to making Small Form Factor PCs, we find that most manufacturers need to make compromises in order to create a viable product.  Radical heat dissipation techniques typically consume much of the area in already cramped confines, motherboards are usually cut-down versions of full-sized models which, in turn, have fewer features or capabilities, and typically these motherboards are based on an older more mature chipset.  Just recently we have taken looks at other SFF PCs, one of which, the Skyhawk IMC6375, was still based around the 865PE chipset, now nearing two years since it was initially released. Shuttle, on the other hand, always seems poised on the edge of... Read more...
Normally, when a new Small Form Factor PC arrives in the lab, the unit is generally  a single manufacturers combination of form and function. Inside and out, everything is designed by only one OEM in a singular effort.  From Shuttle to Epox and more recently Foxconn, the outer chassis is meant to support the technology within. Not to be left out in the cold, SkyHawk/Eagle Technologies has come up with their own line of mini-PCs.  But the difference this time is that they provide the outer shell only; the inner workings have to come from another source. It sure sounds plausible enough to work.  Many DIY builders put together their own "wish-lists" which... Read more...
Every time a new small form factor system arrives in the lab, inevitable comparisons are made to Shuttle's popular line of XPC systems.  The simple fact of the matter is that Shuttle's XPCs have set the bar for the rest of the industry.  And their XPC systems have sold so well, they've transformed Shuttle from a second tier motherboard manufacturer into full-fledged system builders, in a relatively short period of time. With success like that, it should come as no surprise that other manufacturers have since jumped on the bandwagon, and now have an assortment of small form factor systems in their own product line ups as well.  Since the initial introduction of Shuttle's XPC, we... Read more...
When we pause to think of some of the more memorable, market driving, changes to the computer industry, the advent of the mini-PC is one of the first to come to mind.  What started out as a single offering from Shuttle has grown into a market in and of itself, with new entries from a wide range of companies hitting the retail channel regularly.  What was a bold, pioneering direction to take for Shuttle, ended up being far bigger than many of us would have imagined. Now that mini PC products have had time to mature, they have evolved into a major industry.  What started as a basic design now brings innovative ideas to the table such as unique cooling designs aimed at lowering fan... Read more...
Shuttle went through a complete metamorphosis as a company a few years back, and they haven't looked back ever since.  Their wildly successful line of "XPC" small form factor (SFF) PCs has taken off like no other physical incarnation of the PC has in a very long time.  Not even Mr. Jobs could have predicted the kind of success this product line has enjoyed.  For all intents and purposes the Mac itself never garnered this much interest solely as a result of some of the various small footprint versions it has come to market in over the years.  Apple may have been ahead of its time but SFF PCs seem to hit right on time, when everyone seems to be making an effort to... Read more...
Although they now face some stiff competition from the likes of Biostar, Iwill, Soltek and MSI, among others, Shuttle deserves credit for almost single-handedly spurring the so-called small form factor revolution.  When they initially released the venerable SV24 almost three years ago, many PC lovers were immediately enamored by the tiny system's bold design, feature set, and aesthetic appeal.  Admittedly, the first few small form factor systems introduced by Shuttle didn't appeal to many die hard enthusiasts because they lacked AGP slots and were quite loud, but Shuttle's follow-up products most certainly got their attention. Once the XPC proved its viability in the marketplace, Shuttle... Read more...
The Shuttle ST61G4 XPC ATi's Radeon 9100 IGP In Action... By, Marco Chiappetta January 26, 2004   A quick glance and Shuttle's XPC feature comparison table hints at one of the reasons why they have been so successful with their line of small form factor systems.  Browse over to that page and you'll see that they have consistently and quickly released new XPCs based on virtually all popular mainstream chipsets.  With such a wide variety of choices, and with feature sets that cater to buyers in nearly every market segment from the business user to the performance enthusiast, it's no wonder Shuttle's XPCs have been so dominant in the SFF PC arena. Shuttle continues the tradition with... Read more...
The Shuttle SB65G2 & SN85G4 XPCs They Just Keep Getting Better... By, Marco Chiappetta November 13, 2003   It has been almost two full years since we first got our hands on one of Shuttle's original small form factor systems, the SV24.  The first few products in their mini-barebones lineup, as it was then known, generated quite a bit of excitement within the hardware community, but we all universally clamored for two things, an AGP slot and easier access to the CPU and drive connectors, etc.  Shuttle not only listened to the community, but in the process of expanding and improving their mini-barebones product line, they added more and more useful features.  As their mini-barebones... Read more...
The Shuttle XPC SB61G2 Pint-Sized P4 Powerhouse! "Burned in" by Robert Maloney June 8th, 2003 A major trend in the technology industry is miniaturization.  It's no longer good enough to be the fastest or more technologically advanced anymore.  These days everything from cell phones to MP3 players to digital cameras, are showing up on retail shelves in increasingly smaller packages.  So, it should come as no real surprise that PC manufacturers would also follow suit.  That's where Shuttle comes in.  Sure, other companies such as IWILL and Soyo have produced small cube-like PCs, but no other company has capitalized on this trend like Shuttle.  In fact, where... Read more...
The Shuttle XPC SN41G2 Small Form Factor + nForce2 = Perfect Combination By, Marco Chiappetta February 27, 2003 There is no denying that Shuttle Inc., started a trend that got PC enthusiasts and mainstream users interested in SFF (Small Form Factor) systems.  Way back in December of 2001, we took a look at the SV24, and were immediately excited about the possibilities.  Other companies seem to have seen the potential market for these mini-systems as well, with Soyo, Iwill and Tyan, among others, all introducing similar products.  Shuttle definitely has a head start over the competition, however.  They have listened to the hardware community, incorporated new technology and... Read more...
Shuttle's SB51G XPC Mini Barebones The i845GE Based Mini-PC That Feels Full Sized By Dave Altavilla 11/20/2002 Alright, it's quiz time (and you thought you were getting off easy!).  What is perhaps the prominent technological advancement in Personal Computing, beyond high clock speeds with more processing power?  Come on now... use your noggin.  Well, for the detectives in our midst, we're sure you're thinking along the lines of the Shuttle product we're taking a look at today.  If you guessed the word "integration", you win the prize!  If there is one leading indicator of next generation technology for electronics and semiconductors, it's feature size. ... Read more...
Shuttle's SS51G XPC Mini Barebones System The Baddest Mini of Them All! By, Jeff Bouton August 18, 2002   Ever since we saw the first mini PCs from Shuttle back in December, we've been impressed with the XPC Mini PCs themselves, as well as how quickly new models have become available.  Starting with the release of the SV24, the first of the mini PCs, we've seen Shuttle maintain a rigorous timeline, releasing new and improved models in rapid succession.  Yet with this aggressive timeline, we've seen no signs that Shuttle was cutting corners.  In fact, we have quite the opposite impression.  Instead, we've seen Shuttle add new features as well as make design improvements... Read more...
Shuttle's SS40G XPC Mini Barebones System! A Big Package with a Small Footprint By, Jeff Bouton August 13, 2002   Ever since our initial introduction to the first mini barebones PC from Shuttle, we were intrigued not only with its ground breaking design, but with the prospects of future "mini" machines as well.  The SV24 was the first in a rapidly growing line of mini barebones systems to be released by Shuttle, each bringing new features and improvements to the previous design.  The Pentium III based unit wasn't the most powerful system in the market, but it offered such features as USB, FireWire, onboard Ethernet, and TV-Out, making it very rich in features.  The... Read more...
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