Items tagged with Networking

When many think about the security of their devices, it's easy to look at the obvious targets: desktops, notebooks, mobile devices, and of course, the software on all of them. In reality, one of the most vulnerable pieces of digital equipment in our homes can be the router - an effective entry point that gives access to all of your connected devices. In a support page update, NETGEAR says that its high-end NightHawk R7000 will begin recording specific information, although it is currently unclear on if the feature can be disabled. On one hand, NETGEAR could be commended for not keeping this under... Read more...
Gigabit Ethernet has been a long-running standard on desktop PCs and in mainstream networking gear. In fact, it’s been almost two decades since gigabit network controllers appeared on desktops systems. Aquantia Corporation is looking to muscle into the space, however, with a pair of brand new network interface cards that offer multi-gigabit network speeds – and they can do so on existing wiring.“Historically, networking capabilities, such as Gigabit Ethernet introduced in PCs in 2000, defined a significant stepping stone in the PC evolution. But for the past 17 years, that Ethernet port has stagnated... Read more...
Given the rapid pace of technological advancements, our PCs are now scarily efficient compared to those from just a decade ago, and of course, performance is much-improved. That is, unless we're talking about wired networking. While SATA-based solid-state drives can easily peak at 500MB/s, the Ethernet connections we use today are the same we used a decade ago: 1Gbps. If you're one of those who are fed up with not having faster Ethernet in our humble abodes, then you might like what the IEEE has just completed. A new standard, called 802.3bz, has been ratified for upcoming 2.5Gbps and 5Gbps... Read more...
At this point we've reviewed quite a few high-end AC routers, including tri-band routers, flagship dual-band models, and even the latest MU-MIMO devices too. However, the one portion of the market we haven't covered much is the one that exists on the more affordable end of the pricing spectrum. We all know there are quantifiable differences between a $100 GPU and a $300 GPU, but is that also true for 802.11ac routers as well? After all, they're all branded as AC routers, and have similar features and specifications.  This time around, we'll be taking a look at the $75 Tenda AC15 AC1900 router.... Read more...
ASUS crafts some of the highest-performing and best-looking wireless routers on the market, but as far as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is concerned, it's also crafted some of the most insecure. The FTC alleges that ASUS put "hundreds of thousands" of users at risk because they were oblivious to some serious security holes that plagued the most important piece of equipment on their network. Some of these issues were tied to cloud software bundled with the router, but that's not all. The FTC mentions that bugs in some router control panels would allow attackers to change settings without the... Read more...
We’ve all heard about Wi-Fi — the ubiquitous wireless networking standard is commonplace in just about all of our gadgets (smartphones, tablets and notebooks) and even our cars, as well as some home automation and IoT products. It’s hard for most people not to go a day without using Wi-Fi at some point, and with technologies like 802.11ac, we’re transferring data over the air at fantastic speeds (or so we thought). However, Professor Harald Haas, hailing from the University of Edinburgh, has invented Li-Fi, which uses visible light communication or VLC, to transmit data wirelessly at high... Read more...
PC gamers and longtime HotHardware readers will no doubt be familiar with the Killer series of network controllers. We’ve taken a look at a number of the add-in versions over the years, including the original beast with the massive “K” heatsink. Many of today’s gamer-targeted motherboards also feature Killer networking technology, like this Gigabyte motherboard we recently looked at, for example.Though at their core Killer NICs are network controllers, that function just like more basic, mainstream solutions, they offer additional features designed to enhance performance and potentially improve... Read more...
Wireless routers are going through somewhat of a renaissance right now, thanks to the arrival of the 802.11ac standard that is "three times as fast as wireless-N" and the proliferation of Internet-connected devices in our homes and pockets. Whereas before we merely had a handful of laptops and PCs connected to the internet at various times, we now have homes with many devices connected all the time, including our phones, tablets, computers, smart televisions, game consoles, and smart home devices. Though wireless N wasn't bad at the time, it's simply not ideal when dozens of devices are connected... Read more...
On the lookout for a router with obscene specs? With its AC5300 Nighthawk X8, NETGEAR has got you covered. Seriously - most people might not get as excited about a piece of networking equipment as they do the latest graphics card, but this is one router that deserves some close attention. Last month, ASUS launched its RT-AC5300 router, one similar in specs to NETGEAR's latest. But, there is one major difference: ASUS' router has a wall of antennas; 8 in all. NETGEAR's doesn't. Instead, the Nighthawk X8 has just 4 external antennas. Does that mean that ASUS' implementation is more for show? It's... Read more...
It won't be long (hopefully) before Intel's newly launched Skylake processors for the desktop will find their way onto retail shelves (they're already available through system builders). If you've been waiting for Skylake, you'll soon be able to proceed with your new build. In the meantime, you can get started with other parts, including the motherboard, some of which sport Rivet Network's all-new Killer E2400 Gigabit Ethernet Controller. Rivet's new flagship controller introduces something called "Advanced Stream Detect 2.0," which is a collection of technologies and algorithms designed for superior... Read more...
Apple's OS X "Yosemite" brought a lot to the table, and while almost all of it has been good, there has been a stick in the mud. That stick is called "discoveryd", and relates to how the OS handles its networking duties. Since the release of Yosemite, many users have dealt with serious network stability issues, such as disconnections and a doubling of network names, and even full-blown computer crashes. Apple might have had good intentions with discoveryd, but it's clear that it's causing far more harm than good right now. Fortunately, the company agrees, and so it's decided to pull discoveryd... Read more...
We've been hearing about this threat for what seems like forever, but now, it's really real. According to The Wall Street Journal, the United States has a mere 3.4 million IP addresses left in its stock, and those are expected to disappear at some point during the summer. There's only one solution: to accelerate the rollout of IPv6. When the IPv4 protocol was created in the 70s, it was designed with a 32-bit numbering scheme. Understandably, its creators thought 4.2 billion total addresses (2^32) was more than sufficient. But those creators wouldn't have been able to foresee the computing explosion... Read more...
Nokia just announced a huge acquisition today, confirming that it is purchasing one of its closest competitors in the network equipment market: Alcatel-Lucent. The purchase price was a hefty $16.6 billion in an all-stock transaction. The acquisition will allow Nokia to better compete with Chinese players like Huawei, which have flooded the market with low-cost networking equipment. According to Bernstein Research, the combined companies will take over the second place spot in the mobile network hardware market with a 35 percent share. Ericsson will maintain its first place position with a 40 percent... Read more...
We've always wondered if the digital world was spacious enough for Facebook, Twitter, and Google+, and it seems that the answer to that is becoming ever clearer. G+ was mocked for years by those who felt that it joined the social race too late, and that Google was simply bullying users of its other products into signing up and linking an account. Forcing folks to use a product is no great way to organically grow a passionate user base, and it appears that even Google is now realizing that. Quietly, Google has removed the requirement that all new Gmail sign-ups also sign up for a Google+ account.... Read more...
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