Items tagged with Hack

Hacker group OurMine claims to have hacked the official PlayStation Twitter and Facebook pages Sunday night. The group took credit for the hack and posted several messages to the social media accounts, which have now all now been deleted. Before the messages were deleted, they were copied for posterity. Playstationlifestyle.net reports that one of the messages read: PlayStation Network Databases leaked #OurMine Subscribe to #DramaAlert No, we aren’t going to share it, we are a security group, if you works at Playstation then please go to our website ourmine . org – > Contact If you aren't familiar... Read more...
MWR Labs has been able to demonstrate a hack on older Amazon Echo speakers that turns the device into an always-on spy sitting right in your home. Detractors of the way Amazon crafted it's speakers to always listen for your voice will use this as an "I told you so" moment. According to the researchers, the Echo is vulnerable to a physical attack that lets the attacker gain root shell access to the Linux operating system the Echo speaker runs. The scary part is that the root access and installation of the malware could grant the attacker persistent remote access to the device's microphone among... Read more...
Researchers from Exodus Intelligence discovered a zero-day attack that threatens most of the popular smartphones on the market today. The hack is called Broadpwn and it affects devices running iOS and Android. Specifically all Samsung Galaxy S3 through Galaxy S8 devices are susceptible as are the Note 3, 6, 6X, and 6P, and the Apple iPhone 5 and up. The vector for the attack is the Broadcom BCM43xx family of Wi-Fi chips used in all of those smartphones. Exodus writes in its research, "Broadpwn is a fully remote attack against Broadcom’s BCM43xx family of WiFi chipsets, which allows for code execution... Read more...
We took part in an interesting demo this week that was both eye-opening and somewhat alarming. We met with representatives from Synaptics to discuss what we thought would be its latest sensor technology or HCI device, but were treated to a real-world hacking display that would leave most people slack-jawed. Why, you ask? Because in only a few minutes, an image of my fingerprint had been stolen and duplicated, and it was used to gain access to my smartphone (and a demo notebook), but it could have just as easily been a personal / corporate laptop or any other device with a fingerprint sensor.It... Read more...
  Just yesterday, we posted a story concerning printer security and how we should take it more seriously given IoT botnets that are swooping across the globe (namely Mirai), along with the sensitive data and documents these machines are custodians of. Today’s printers have relatively potent processors, complex operating systems and of course connect to the internet, to enable remote printing and firmware updates (among other things). Unsurprisingly, though the timing is impeccable, a hacker by the name of Stackoverflowin’ just made the case for increased security with it comes to printers.... Read more...
The FBI is currently investigating a series of cyberattacks on the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), that they believe the Chinese military to be responsible for. The attacks on high-level employees' computers started in 2010 and resurfaced again in 2011 and 2013. Victims included former FDIC Chairwoman Sheila Bair. The FDIC is one of three institutions responsible for regulating commercial banks in the United States. They manage confidential plans regarding how big banks would deal with bankruptcy. They also have access to the information of millions of individual American deposits.... Read more...
Maybe he’s the hero the United States “deserves, but not the one it needs right now”. It looks like the United States has its own hacking Dark Knight. American vigilante hacker “The Jester” gained unauthorized access to the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website and left a very interesting message for the Russian government. This past Friday, the Jester hacked into MID.ru, the official website of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He found a vulnerability in the website’s code and injected his own code into it. He inserted the shriek of the American civil alert sound (aka "The Emergency... Read more...
Are you nostalgic for the days of POGs, Beanie Babies, and Surge? Are you the type of person who constantly pounds out in all caps, “ONLY 90S KIDS WILL REMEMBER THIS”? Then Windows 95 must be the smartwatch operating system for you. It lives! (Credit: Nick Lee) Developer Nick Lee managed to get Windows 95 working on his Apple Watch. And Apple Watch definitely has the specs (check our full review). The watch packs in a 520 MHz processor, 512 MB of RAM, and 8GB of internal storage. Compared with Nick's original $3,000, 300 MHz Pentium II powered PC with 256MB of RAM, the Apple Watch is practically... Read more...
Toy maker VTech initially informed the public of a security breach this past Friday, right when millions of Americans were in the midst of Black Friday shopping. VTech disclosed that its customer database was compromised, exposing names, email addresses, mailing addresses, download histories and encrypted passwords for users. Even more troubling is that in addition to 4.8 million adult accounts that were affected by the breach, 200,000 children were also caught up in the mess. Earlier this morning, VTech gave a status update, describing that the initial breach occurred on November 14th. However,... Read more...
The parade of banks, insurance companies and retailers that have suffered data breaches has caused many people to store their passwords with sites like LastPass. The security company creates a unique password for each of the user’s logins and provides access to those passwords via a single, master password.Now, LastPass is admitting that at least some of its data has been comprised. The company believes that its customers are not vulnerable, but it concedes that email addresses and authentication hashes are among the data affected. Password reminders and server per user salts were also comprised.... Read more...
These days, you can’t seem to escape reports of major corporations being “taken down” by phishing schemes (“Hello, Sony”) or ordinary spam. Valve doesn’t want its hugely popular Steam digital distribution service (or its users) to fall victim to such attacks, so it’s taking a rather unusual step to help weed out accounts that could possibly be used for nefarious purposes. Valve has adopted a new policy that requires users to spend at least $5 before they are able to access a wealth of features that Steam users normally take for granted. Thankfully the threshold is rather low and it is pretty easy... Read more...
As we discovered late last week, Lenovo has been serving up some tainted Superfish via its consumer PCs. Once Lenovo was called out for its heinous actions, the company offered an apology and vowed to remove Superfish from shipping systems (it provided removal instructions and later an automatic removal tool for machines already affected by Superfish). However, the apology apparently wasn’t enough as Lenovo is already facing a lawsuit stemming from Superfish. Now it looks a though hacker group Lizard Squad is retaliating in its own, childish way. At around... Read more...
The war of words between the United States and North Korea is escalating. Following the Sony breach that took place in late November (all because of a comedy film called The Interview), the FBI and the Obama Administration pointed fingers at North Korea for orchestrating the attack. North Korea has claimed innocence throughout the aftermath, but indicated in early December that it condoned the “righteous deed.” The Obama administration stated that it would “respond proportionately” to the hack, and not long after, North Korea was the on the receiving end of an “unprecedented” Internet takedown... Read more...
If you mess with the bull, you’ll get the horns. Sony became the victim of a massive cyberattack that took place in late November. But not only was Sony a victim, but numerous Sony employees were caught up in the mess when sensitive personal information like social security numbers were leaked onto the internet. After the hack came threats against Sony employees and their families, followed by terrorist threats against movie theaters that dared to show the film, “The Interview,” which resulted in major cinema chains withdrawing their support for the film. Without backing from big names like Regal... Read more...
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