Items tagged with wannacry

Back in 2017, the National Security Agency (NSA) lost control of one of its hacking tools called EternalBlue. Since the hacking tool slipped into the world, it has been picked up by hackers in North Korea, Russia, and China, among other places. The tool has been used to allegedly create billions of dollars in damage around the world. Unfortunately, the hacking tool has now been deployed against cities and states in America as well. For the last three weeks, the city of Baltimore has fought a cyber attack by digital extortionists that has resulted in thousands of computers being frozen, broken email services, and interruptions to real estate sales, water bills, health alert services, and more.... Read more...
Whoever oversees IT for TSMC's factories is probably in hot water right now. The company suffered from a major virus attack recently that forced it to shut down some of its factories. TSMC has now stepped up and admitted that while the cause of the shutdowns was a virus infection, the ultimate cause of that infection was unpatched Windows systems. Initially, TSMC was vague about the exact cause only admitting that the issue was an unspecified computer virus. TSMC has stated that the specific virus that infected its systems leading to the shutdown was WannaCry, which has previously been linked to North Korea. The WannaCry outbreak that caused the factories to shut down affected unpatched Windows... Read more...
We are only months removed from the massive WannaCry cyberattack that hit hundreds of thousands of computers in over 150 countries, crippling some hospitals in the United Kingdom. WannaCry became an overnight global scare after spreading far and wide within the first few hours. Up until now, it was not clear where exactly the worm originated. According to the Trump administration, North Korea is to blame, just as security outfit Symantec suspected months ago. In an op-ed piece published in The Wall Street Journal, homeland security adviser Thomas P. Bossert publicly attributed the massive WannaCry cyberattack to North Korea, adding that the U.S. is not making the allegation lightly. "It is based... Read more...
You might think that the massive number of security breaches that have happened in recent years would push corporate giants and medical facilities out there to take a look at their own security and ensure that their networks are protected. We are only a few months removed from the massive attack that breached Equifax and leaked the information on 143 million Americans into the wild. Now the UK's National Audit Office (NAO) is giving a postmortem following the WannaCry ransomware attacks that hit several hospitals in the country.The ensuing investigation found incredibly lax security protecting the networks and determined that NHS had failed to follow basic IT security practices. The key... Read more...
No good deed goes unpunished. That could be the case for UK citizen Marcus Hutchins, who was arrested this week in Nevada by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). While the name Marcus Hutchins might not be familiar to you, you might recognize his Twitter handle, MalwareTech, and the Los Angeles-based security firm that he works for, Kryptos Logic. It was Hutchins who helped to thwart the initial outbreak of the WannaCry ransomware attack that rocked computer systems around the globe back in mid-May. By registering a domain that WannaCry was pinging, Hutchins effectively activated the ransomware’s kill switch, stopping it from propagating across networks. Marcus Hutchins  -... Read more...
The hackers behind the WannaCry ransomware that became an overnight global scare did not strike it rich over their nefarious deeds, though they did make around $143,000 after cashing out all of the Bitcoin payments made by victims. Had it not been for the quick response of security researchers, and one in particular who accidentally discovered a kill switch of sorts, they might have made much more. Elliptic, a London-based start-up that aids law enforcement with tracking down cybercriminals that use Bitcoin, confirmed that the WannaCry withdrew 52.2 BTC from online wallets this week. Bitcoin currency is currently worth around $2,740, resulting in the six-figure payday for the people behind the... Read more...
Following last month's WannaCry attack, it looks as though another ransomware outbreak is quickly spreading around the globe. The attack seems to be centered in the Ukraine, where the ransomware has crippled the country’s central bank and power utilities like Ukrenego and Kyivenergo. Kiev’s Borispol airport has also come under attack according to a Facebook posting, and the city’s metro system has seen its payment infrastructure infiltrated. However, the official Twitter account for the Ukraine was decidedly upbeat about the outbreak, breaking the tension with a little bit of humor: Some of our gov agencies, private firms were hit by a virus. No need to panic, we’re putting utmost efforts... Read more...
It seemed for a moment that the WannaCry ransomware that wreaked havoc at hospitals across Europe had been neutralized, but apparently it is still causing disruptions. The latest report comes from Honda Motor Co., which said on Wednesday that it had to shut down one of its factories in Japan after discovering that WannaCry had wormed its way onto the company's computer network.Honda temporarily ceased production at its Sayama plant located northwest of Tokyo. That particular factory produces several Honda automobile models, including the Accord sedan, Odyssey minivan, and Step Wagon compact vehicle. On any given day, it churns out around 1,000 vehicles, making a halt in production more than just... Read more...
The WannaCry ransomware outbreak that rocked the globe last month opened the eyes of many people to the dangers of ransomware. However, Microsoft is making it clear that at least one version of Windows 10 will be able to completely fight off ransomware and other malware that typically targets its operating systems. Microsoft boats that Windows 10 S is immune to such attacks because it cannot run traditional Win32 apps. Windows 10 S is only capable of running Universal Windows Platform (UWP) apps that are available from the Windows Store. This gives users a curated app experience that should [hopefully] weed out any nefarious apps that could potentially put users at risk. “Any app that doesn’t... Read more...
Now that the dust has settled on a global ransomware outbreak that could have been much worse than it ended up being, we can all breathe a sigh of relieve. Meanwhile, security outfits are busy analyzing the outbreak to uncover as much information as possible about the threat known as WannaCry. According to Symantec's investigation into things, WannaCry has "strong links to Lazarus," which is the same group that attacked Sony Pictures and made off with $81 million from the Bangladesh Central Bank. Symantec says that before the recent outbreak occurred, a near identical version of WannaCry was used in targeted attacks in the months of February, March, and April of this year. The only difference... Read more...
For a quick minute, it looked as though a strain of ransomware that was seemingly stolen from the United States National Security Agency (NSA) was going to be a major problem for PCs around the world, and in particular Windows XP systems. Microsoft even made the unusual move of releasing an emergency patch for Windows XP even though it stopped supporting the legacy OS a long time ago. But now a week after the initial WannaCry outbreak it's been discovered that Windows 7 PCs were the hardest hit. A researcher for Kaspersky Lab posted a message on Twitter saying "the Windows XP count is insignificant," adding that Windows 7 took the brunt of the ransomware's activity. When looking at the overall... Read more...
The Wanna Decrypter ransomware that began floating around the Internet late last week, or WannCry as it's commonly known, has made a lasting impact, with hundreds of thousands of PCs worldwide being affected. What the malware does is even more alarming: one minute, you're using your computer normally; the next, your data is locked away behind a key unless you fork over hundreds of dollars in ransom money. As has become typical of ransomware, WannaCry will demand payment via Bitcoin in order to recover the data the attackers locked down. Once payment is received, an encryption key is typically (but not always) sent that will allow the user to recover their data. It's a chore for the inexperienced... Read more...
Last Friday, we reported on a major cyberattack involving ransomeware that hit a large number of computers - including some belonging to the UK's National Health Service. At first, the malware's reach wasn't too clear, but as the weekend went on, we learned that the number of affected PCs reached at least 200,000 worldwide. Given the nature of this beast, that is downright terrifying. The big question right now is, "Who's at fault?" The blame could easily be shifted to Microsoft, as the bug that allowed this to happen was directly attributed to its own code. While the company is to be commended for releasing a rare Windows XP patch to help squash the bug, it comes a bit too late. Microsoft knew... Read more...
The Internet community was able to breathe a temporary sigh of relief after a 22-year-old security researcher accidentally discovered a way to thwart WannaCrypt, a fast-spreading strain of malware that was stolen from the National Security Agency. After reaching tens of thousands of systems in over 70 countries within the first few hours, WannaCrypt was stopped dead in its tracks. Also known as WannaCry, WCry, and by a handful of other designations, the unprecedented ransomware attack was particularly bothersome for hospitals in the UK. Many of them shut down and turned patients away. In some cases, operations had to be cancelled. Doctors and staff were locked out of viewing patent records because... Read more...
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