Items tagged with Violence

YouTube has included long-standing restrictions for video that has violent gaming footage. YouTube has now announced that it will change its guidelines to allow it to be more permissive in allowing depictions of violence in video games. The caveat is that the violence can't be the sole focus of the video. The rule change started on December 2 with YouTube stating that on that date, scripted or simulated violent content found in video games will be treated the same as scripted content in TV or movies. YouTube announced the change in its policies on Twitter, noting that it had heard gamers "loud and clear" that its policies needed to change. Gaming Creators: We’ve heard loud and clear that... Read more...
Many game developers use the massive gaming expo PAX West – which is currently underway in Seattle – to unveil their latest wares. There is always some hot, new gaming footage to come out of the show that sparks the usual conversations about graphics quality, framerates, game mechanics, and the myriad of other things that make a good (or bad) game. One of the game trailers released last night, however, may spark a different kind of debate. And we’re not sure that’s a good thing. If you grew up in the ‘80s and ‘90s, you may remember that discussions about video games, and video game violence especially, spurred huge protests and even sparked congressional debates. Ultimately, video game rating... Read more...
A new study further debunks the idea that violent video games turn people into cold blooded killers, or whatever politicians are claiming these days. In an interesting twist, the study does link aggression and hostile behavior to games, but it's not the violent content of a title that gets a gamer's blood boiling, it's the frustration level. Whether it's trying to learn a game's complicated controls or navigating difficult levels, frustration and aggression are common side effects of all types of video games, not just violent ones. Anyone who's ever played Flappy Bird will probably find themselves shaking their heads in agreement with the study's claim. Anecdotally, I can remember playing Madden... Read more...
The problem is a simple one: There are images out there that should not be on Facebook, where they’re viewable by anyone aged 13 and up. However, Facebook has an extremely difficult job to do when it comes to deciding which and what type of images might fall into the “banned” category, and the issue has recently come into focus over a beheading video that got so much attention that British PM David Cameron even weighed in on it. Facebook has now pulled the video, and although the social network isn’t actually changing any of its standards, it is revisiting how it enforces its guidelines. "When we review content that is reported to us, we will take a more holistic look... Read more...
When it comes to advertising, many companies are understandably picky about where their ads appear. That plug for a minivan makes sense in a mainstream magazine, but it’s a little odd if the same ad shows up near adult content. So Facebook announced today that it’s going to begin pulling ads from Groups and Pages that have sexual content. Pages with violent content also won’t be able to display pages anymore. The Facebook ads that will be getting pulled from certain pages are the ones that appear on the right side of the window, and only on pages or groups that have controversial content. “In order to be thorough, this review process will be manual at first, but in the... Read more...
A new analysis of 130 total studies covering more than 130,000 gamers from elementary school age to college age conducted in the U.S.A., Europe and Japan reasserts the influence of violent video games on aggression in children. Dr. Craig Anderson's conclusions appeared in Psychological Bulletin, a journal of the American Psychological Association on Monday.Dr. Anderson is a psychologist at Iowa State University. After reviewing the findings of past studies, Anderson said:"Playing those types of games increased the likelihood of later aggressive behavior, increase aggressive emotion. It also increases what you might think of as desensitization, or a lack of empathy."Anderson said the results held... Read more...
We feel like we've been here before, and in fact, we have. Sort of, at least. The same hotly debated video game law in California has come to the forefront of attention once more, with a federal appeals court striking down the law that sought to bar minors from purchasing or renting games that were deemed too violent. The 9th United States Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the original 2005 law "violates minors' rights under the Constitution's First and 14th amendments." The three judge panel's unanimous ruling upholds an earlier ruling in the United States District Court. If it would have passed, the law would have prohibited the rental or sale of "violent" (who determines that, we wonder?)... Read more...
It has been discussed often, yet there has been no definitive answer about whether or not video games contribute to societal violence.  If you look around you can find studies that say "yes," and studies that say "no."  Well, Oprah's favorite shrink, Dr. Phil, is going to tackle the issue, as he prepares to tape a show devoted to just that subject. GamePolitics has learned that the popular TV shrink is taping an episode about game violence on Thursday. Readers may recall that just one day after the Virginia Tech massacre, Dr. Phil made comments on the Larry King show which seemed to indicate a belief that violent games played a role in the killings. BTW, we are allowed to use the word "shrink"... Read more...